Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Practicalities of Hammocks

    Getting a hammock tent- think they're awesome.

    How does one get a good set up for cooking when it's raining? Your solutions are welcomed.

  2. #2
    Senior Member DuckFat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale Killer-V 900 (Mountain), Jamis Aurora (Touring)
    Posts
    252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are talking about Hennessey Hammocks then get the extra large (hexagonal) rainfly and you shouldn't have problems positioning it to give you a nice dry patch for cooking or whatever.

  3. #3
    I'm made of earth! becnal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Aspen touring/off-road hybrid, and a Bob Yak trailer. Yak very useful for us car-free types that like to buy lots of beer.
    Posts
    2,008
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hex fly.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  4. #4
    Senior Member stokell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    On the Road
    My Bikes
    Custom built tourer, custom electric bike, beaters everywhere
    Posts
    1,260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I usually stealth camp with my Hennessy hammock. That precludes cooking, as you aren't stealthing if you are attracting attention.

    That said, the hex fly is amazingly useful for just about everything from cooking in the rain to keeping your bike dry.

    Last summer I had to set up quickly in the rain. I first set the hex fly. I had already cooked, but you can cook under it before setting up the hammock. Once you've set up the fly you have a lot of options. You can set up the hammock, cook a gourmet meal, arrange a line dance or et al.

    I choose the former (setting up hammock) and then dropped the bike under the hammock to stay dry. It was really cool. I was laying in the hammock high and dry listening to tunes on my MP-3 and watching the wet forest canopy around me as the sun set.

    It doesn't get better than that.

  5. #5
    Senior Member FlyingAnchor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Humboldt County Ca
    My Bikes
    All Recumbent, Strada and TT Tour
    Posts
    301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Man, I want to go touring with you.

    I have been debating the tent vs Hennesey Hammock and need to pull the trigger before my tour this summer.

    I already own a tent that will suffice but lust for the Hammock.

    Looking forward to this thread.

    Steven
    Dragging Anchor

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stokell View Post
    I usually stealth camp with my Hennessy hammock. That precludes cooking, as you aren't stealthing if you are attracting attention.

    That said, the hex fly is amazingly useful for just about everything from cooking in the rain to keeping your bike dry.

    Last summer I had to set up quickly in the rain. I first set the hex fly. I had already cooked, but you can cook under it before setting up the hammock. Once you've set up the fly you have a lot of options. You can set up the hammock, cook a gourmet meal, arrange a line dance or et al.

    I choose the former (setting up hammock) and then dropped the bike under the hammock to stay dry. It was really cool. I was laying in the hammock high and dry listening to tunes on my MP-3 and watching the wet forest canopy around me as the sun set.

    It doesn't get better than that.
    That sounds sweet. Can't wait.

  7. #7
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    11,698
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stokell View Post
    Once you've set up the fly you have a lot of options. You can set up the hammock, cook a gourmet meal, arrange a line dance or et al.
    Now, c'mon Mr Stokell... a line dance????? That's stretching things just a tiny tad And does the gourmet meal include wine service?

    As to Magna's original question about food... do what we all do when it rains... pack off to the nearest pub for a counter meal and a few rounds of drinks!!! Then... you have a good time, get a belly full of food and remain true to the stealth camping doctrine

    FWIW, I've just ordered a bivvy... a hammock without the strings attached.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  8. #8
    Senior Member stokell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    On the Road
    My Bikes
    Custom built tourer, custom electric bike, beaters everywhere
    Posts
    1,260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Now, c'mon Mr Stokell... a line dance????? That's stretching things just a tiny tad And does the gourmet meal include wine service?

    As to Magna's original question about food... do what we all do when it rains... pack off to the nearest pub for a counter meal and a few rounds of drinks!!! Then... you have a good time, get a belly full of food and remain true to the stealth camping doctrine

    FWIW, I've just ordered a bivvy... a hammock without the strings attached.
    Since I travel alone, line dancing is not out of the question I agree about the pub, and I often do that when one is available but I some times stealth camp in heavily rural areas.

    As for the bivvy, I hope your ground is always soft and dry. That's the main reason I bought a hammock. I originally was shopping for a bivouac.

  9. #9
    Spelling Snob Hobartlemagne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Plano, Texas
    My Bikes
    Panasonic DX4000, Bianchi Pista
    Posts
    2,863
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't sleep in a hammock, so that would be out for me.

    The first rule of flats is You don't talk about flats!

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    400
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used a Hennessy Hammock when I biked across n. Australia. 6 weeks and I had a poor sleeping bad - but with bubble pas (mylar coated) for my head and shoulders I was comfortable. I hit rain on the Atherton tablelands (July), but the rest of the time I just used the fly to keep the dew off and I thus kept warmer ;-)

    My hammock is the Deluxe safari (A-Sym) with snakeskins and with tree savers. The latter two are particularly useful for set up and takedown. The hammock handles my wieght easily (220 lbs+). See particluars on the HH web site: http://www.hennessyhammock.com/

    I got mine as a remanufactured one - they found some sewing flaws when they did an inspection on a batch that came fromm the factory (in viet Nam I think) and did the repair (cannot see it) and the rest is history - 6 weeks in the outback and it was great - just stretch the nylon "ropes" once or twice before you use it after not using it for a while ;-)

  11. #11
    Senior Member Madsnail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    München, DE
    Posts
    58
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Hobartlemagne View Post
    I can't sleep in a hammock, so that would be out for me.
    I'm about the same.
    I've done it in the past though. I've slept in a huge hammock which allowed me to lie diagonally (flat). I could sleep but that wasn't the best for me.
    My main problem is that I sleep on my belly, and you can't do that in a hammock... And I toss around quite a lot on top of that.
    The thing is, I really feel like giving it a try but those Hennessy hammocks are way too expensive to buy one and figure out after a few nights that this is not going to work for me.

  12. #12
    It's just bikes...
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Rowlett, Texas
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1500, '07 Trek T1
    Posts
    282
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like these guys said, if you hang the fly (preferably Hex) first, you can cook under it. But, if it's windy at all, that may not keep the rain off of your grub (if that matters to you). One thing that might be cool is a Jetboil stove with their hanging attachment... http://www.jetboil.com/Products/Accessories/Hanging-Kit. If you equip your hexfly with a ridgeline, you could attach the hanging kit directly to that. I looked at one of these when they were on sale from REI, but didn't pull the trigger. I'm using a pop can stove now.

    Steve

  13. #13
    Senior Member stokell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    On the Road
    My Bikes
    Custom built tourer, custom electric bike, beaters everywhere
    Posts
    1,260
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The great thing about the Safari is that it is so big you can lay almost flat. I'm not sure about the tummy though. Many people think of those other hammocks, but my little illustration below shows that you sleep almost flat on a Hennessy.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "As for the bivvy, I hope your ground is always soft and dry. That's the main reason I bought a hammock. I originally was shopping for a bivouac."

    I totally agree a hammock is more comfortable than a bivy in treed buggy terrain. I have wrapped myself around a tree bivouacking in areas with heavy pine needle cover. It wasn't horrible. Bivies originally came from mountaineering where the previous option was your feet in your backpack and your body in your anorak. I still don't find my hammock all that comfy. It's heaven when I first crawl in, but not much fun over the whole night. I probably need to be shorter.

  15. #15
    Has opinion, will express
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    11,698
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm a tough guy. Give me a piece of ground and I can sleep on it!

    To be totally truthful, the bivvy is designed for me doing long-distance, self-supported rides such as 1200 randonnees. There will be a lighweight pad and a light down sleeping bag included in the package. It's not a real bivvy in the sense of the GoreTex bags; it has a headframe, but it still comes in at well under 1kg. It's a Doite brand. I picked it up new on eBay for a total of $107 AUD incl postage. It's first official outing (after practice putting it up, course) will be a 1200 randonnee at Easter.

    Up to now, I have been using a relfective emergency bivvy that I acquired in North America in 2005, and it has done me quite well. But the lack of closure across the top can be a VIP invitation to the mosquitoes and other insects.

    Sorry, I am not trying to hijack the hammock thread; there are other options out there, but I don't think it worth starting a new thread just to talk about bivvies.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •