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Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

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Old 01-29-08, 12:04 PM   #1
alhanson
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Vintage touring bike refurb?

Has anyone redone an old touring bike and still using it? I have an old (1970's) Schwinn world tourist frame I have stripped and am trying to figure on what to do with it. I am leaning to a full our touring rig.

The frame is steel and in great shape, I have it completely down to bare metal and am painting it this weekend. Brooks on the way etc. Just trying to determine if it would make a good 'custom' rig.

Thanks

Andrian
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Old 01-29-08, 12:14 PM   #2
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I have a vintage (80s) Novara Randonee on the way. It will be mostly be a commuter/townie, but I've got a rack, some panniers and an itch, so I'll see you on the road.
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Old 01-29-08, 12:26 PM   #3
alhanson
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I have a vintage (80s) Novara Randonee on the way. It will be mostly be a commuter/townie, but I've got a rack, some panniers and an itch, so I'll see you on the road.
That is funny, I live in the same area of the world. Just wasn't sure what to do with the frame, so many people have suggested the single speed but I don't know that I would care to ride it more than a mile or so. Seems a shame to waste a perfectly good frame.

Last edited by alhanson; 01-29-08 at 01:19 PM.
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Old 01-29-08, 01:51 PM   #4
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I use a 1978 Shogun(butted steel frame) for my everyday/commuter/touring bike since it was new,never had any problems with it.
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Old 01-29-08, 02:31 PM   #5
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I revived a free '83 Miyata frame with spare/donated parts for a commuter bike. After I rode it several thousand miles I sold it for $140 on Cragslist.

I vote "Yes"
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Old 01-29-08, 03:04 PM   #6
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I have a beautiful old Coventry Eagle frame. Respray and total refit. Rides like a dreak. Here's an image.

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Old 01-29-08, 03:17 PM   #7
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It depends on what the objective is: Low cost tourer; vintage recreation of a bike you love; high end tourer...

I would not go for a high end tourer, because normally you will have to buy obsolete components or do bad things, to bend the frame in order to make it work. That seems like throwing good components after a bad frame

For a cheap tourer though, if you have the components that fit the bike, then it will work just as well as it once did, could be a great deal.

For a vintage bike, that particular bike wouldn't turn my crank hard enough to be worth restoring, but if it does yours, go for it.

Given the paint is stripped, I think the main use would be low cost tourer. So the bottom line is can you cheaply find the components to fit the bike, how about the braze-on situation. If you can do it, the steel should still be fine, what about the alignment?
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Old 01-29-08, 03:18 PM   #8
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We have three vintage bikes that we will be using on a regular basis.
I say do it.
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Old 01-29-08, 03:25 PM   #9
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One of my two touring bikes is a 1985 Miyata 1000, which I bought new. Many components are originals, and others are replacements or upgrades. The bike has always ridden like a dream, and still does. I use it now for day tours, and my newer bike for multi-day trips.

Although many newer bike technologies are fantastic -- I have them all on my newer touring bike -- I cannot think of any innovations that have become essential and indispensable.

Good luck restoring your vintage bike!
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Old 01-29-08, 04:22 PM   #10
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This can be fun but it can be a trip down a path that can be expensive. I have a Trek 520 from the early 80s, however when parts wear out new ones do not automatically fit. Example I had a worn/bent chainring that I am having replaced but it will probably mean new cranks and bb as well. However the bike rides nicely so I am willing to give it a go. But the old 27 inch wheels may also someday need a rebuild- you see where this leads. If the bike rides well and everything seems to work Ok go for it. If you think you are building a Rivendell you will probably spend about as much on it.
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Old 01-29-08, 07:51 PM   #11
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There is a point of diminishing return involved in any bike restoration project. If the goal is to restore a vintage touring machine, but it's going to cost XXX dollars for parts and labour, some people might decide that XXX is too much to pay. Others might be OK with XXX. It's a personal choice.

I have two touring bikes now because I was swayed by the diminishing return argument. When all I had was my 1985 Miyata 1000, I tried to replace parts that wore out or broke with components of equal or better quality. When it came time to replace the pedals, however, the cost of comparable ones was over $100. I decided not to replace the pedals, and put the money toward a new bike.
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Old 01-29-08, 08:18 PM   #12
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Hi Andrian,

There's a lot of soul in these vintage, lugged-steel bikes. I've rebuilt a number of them thru the years. (Nishiki Cresta, Zebrakenko Touring). I'm currently enjoying an '83 Specialized Expedition that I rebuilt a couple of years ago. (Pics HERE.) The rebuild was not to original specs, but I used mostly NOS parts from the day, making improvements here and there. It's been an excellent tourer and will head out again in May.

These restored rigs have a little of 'you' in them and they're unique. There's a special feeling you get when riding it, fully loaded, into the sunset!

Enjoy the project and the riding!

All the best,
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Old 01-29-08, 09:22 PM   #13
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VeloVeg, that Expedition is 'top of the line' in my book. Nice bike. I had an 82 and loved it.

I also like the feel of lugged steel. For an old tourer, fully loaded, the flex is just right!

Jerry H
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Old 01-29-08, 10:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alhanson View Post
Has anyone redone an old touring bike and still using it? I have an old (1970's) Schwinn world tourist frame I have stripped and am trying to figure on what to do with it. I am leaning to a full our touring rig.

The frame is steel and in great shape, I have it completely down to bare metal and am painting it this weekend. Brooks on the way etc. Just trying to determine if it would make a good 'custom' rig.

Thanks

Andrian
If you ask in the Classic & Vintage forum we will all encourage you to go for it .

We'll need photos!

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Old 01-30-08, 09:18 AM   #15
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Thanks for the encouragement. I am going to go the touring route as that is much more my speed! I will be sure to include pics when I am done. I have a long commute to test her on when I am finished.

I know this isn't a common situation but on this particuliar bike I am not worried about the cost. It is more of a project/hobby and I am sure I could get a new rig for similiar pricing. I work part time in a shop so that I can get the pro-deals on parts and free labor (read use of shop tools when not working)

I love the Coventry Eagle and Specialized! I think they are great! I am really glad you included those pics of the Specialized because I ordered that same style handle bars along with a B-17 just yesterday morning. I was starting to think it was a mistake.

As for the braze-ons, I don't have that many on there but was thinking of using the solid steel clamps that were on it. Also, adding some steel and tapping some new holes shouldn't be that hard... I think I will have to work on this thought the next few days and check out the builders section.

I will be sure to post the pictures here in the next few months!
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Old 02-02-08, 12:35 AM   #16
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Like acantor I have an 85 Miyata 1000 which I found under a pile of clothing at a Salvation Army charity shop for under $10.00!
I found a pair of Continental touring tires at a blow out sale, a new BB from my LBS, a Dura Ace NOS seat post & free wheel at a garage sale, new sealed bearings for the hubs, a Japanese leather saddle from Goodwill, new Dia Compe brake levers & Shimano peddles from the LBS scratch and dent bin, an Axiom expedition rack at 50% off and a chain, chain rings, cables fenders, bar tape a few other odds and ends. I also have an extra road wheel set I got off an old sport touring bike I paid $15.00 and which I sold the frame for $75.00, and a BoB trailer for $180.00! So I think I built up an old touring bike for a very affordable amount of money based on luck and smart shopping.
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Old 02-02-08, 08:37 AM   #17
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I recently picked up an old Univega Gran Turismo, which I will be rehabbing. So it will be cool to see your progress and compare with my own. I will post some pictures as I go, but it is going to be a long slow process, I can tell. My LBS understands what I'm doing, and has some cool ideas and resources. And they totally understood when I said, NO, I'm NOT going to turn this into an SS. Cool thread.
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Old 02-02-08, 09:14 AM   #18
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Another C&V'er votes go for it. There is much more to a bike than the actual monetary costs, and that will vary by individual. FWIW I still have what is left of my poor old Motobecane Nomade that went transcontinental in 1977. It started out life as a $35 basket case. It is making a come back as a Gentleman's City Bike and believe me the wheels alone cost more than a half way decent new bike

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Old 02-04-08, 12:31 AM   #19
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People say it costs a bunch of money to rehab the old bikes, but nothing like buying them new, so long as you enjoy the time you spend doing the work.

I've got three touring frames from 1985, a Sekai and two bridgestones. The t700 came stock ($100) and I've left it pretty much alone. The t500 and the Sekai I got as frames and built them up. I've probably go $5-600 in each of those all told and I think they're killer. They're at the very least as good as any of the sub thousand dollar production bikes.

I ride them all regularly. I've toured on the t500. They're smooth and quiet and I know them like the back of my hand (which I think is worth something).
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Old 02-12-08, 10:27 PM   #20
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I've got my vintage Novara up and running with a new chain, cables, bb, and headset bearings.

The wheels are true and look good, but I'm a little concerned about loading up the bike for a weekend trip. Should I just make sure they are tensioned right? is there anything else I need to do to make sure they are up for a loaded trip up the towpath?
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Old 02-13-08, 08:04 PM   #21
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Vintage Trek

Vintage Schwinn
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