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Thread: Mirrors

  1. #1
    Tourererer
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    Mirrors

    I did a search on this topic and didn't come up with much. Just wondering if people like to use them on tour. If so, why? If not, why? What brands and styles to people like (glasses, helmet, bar end?)

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    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
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    I like them a lot, because it allows me to look behind. What else? Well, also to put on my make-up and make tiny self-portrait.

    I use a Mountain Myrricle (sp?) with a bit of rigging because my bike has bar-end shifters. I know there's a commercial solution for this somewhere. I like the bar-type because it's part of the bike. I never had problems with angles or panniers blocking the view. A nice trick on narrow roads is to ride the lane to force the cars move over and then I move closer to the road edge just before they pass, leaving a lot of room.
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

  3. #3
    Macro Geek
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    A rear-view mirror is good. It's useful to be able to get a sense of the traffic coming up from behind. I wouldn't leave home without one.

    Not all types of mirror work on all bikes, and there are personal preferences. I have a bar-end mirror on my drop-down bars... it's not an ideal arrangement... hard to see. I prefer a mirror that Velcros onto the brake lever, but on my current bike with STI brifters, the plastic mirror holder makes the brake lever too thick for my comfort.

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    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cemmes View Post
    I did a search on this topic and didn't come up with much. Just wondering if people like to use them on tour. If so, why? If not, why? What brands and styles to people like (glasses, helmet, bar end?)
    I used to use an eyeglasses mount, but, it was discontinued years ago and I have never found a suitable replacement. I currently use a bar end or brake lever mount depending on the bike. I think they are zefal but wouldn't bet on it. I tried the helmet mounts but have never had good luck with them. I break them, lose them, or am not wearing the helmet and need the mirror.

    Aaron
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    Senior Member 82times's Avatar
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    I also like them very much. Nice to not have to crane my neck backwards for little checks of traffic, especially nice for commuting and touring. Still I recommend looking over your shoulder when changing lanes, turning, etc.

    I've had great experience with this style (the Blackburn Multi Rearview) with drop bars.
    http://www.bicyclebuys.com/item/0139957

    ...but now I'm rolling with bar-end shifters, so I've got one of these on order (The Ultra Light Bike Mirror):
    http://www.rivbike.com/search/run?qu...product=20-177

    --I'll post how it works out next week sometime.

    I tried one of those tiny on-the-helmet mirrors and found it awkward. I took it off the helmet, never use it. Some folks love'm, though.

  6. #6
    Kwisatz Haderach fillthecup's Avatar
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    I love my mirror, allows me to make sure the people coming up behind me are giving me enough space. Comforting on long, narrow, winding roads.

    I use a helmet mounted mirror, it works well, but I had to epoxy it on when the adhesive it came with failed. It's worked like a charm for four years and counting.

  7. #7
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by acantor View Post
    A rear-view mirror is good. It's useful to be able to get a sense of the traffic coming up from behind. I wouldn't leave home without one.

    Not all types of mirror work on all bikes, and there are personal preferences. I have a bar-end mirror on my drop-down bars... it's not an ideal arrangement... hard to see. I prefer a mirror that Velcros onto the brake lever, but on my current bike with STI brifters, the plastic mirror holder makes the brake lever too thick for my comfort.

    I have the type that velrcos on. There are two problems with it. If the mirror gets bumped it, is no longer focused correctly. I have the Blackburn and the design of the swivel joint leaves a lot to be desired.

    Other than that, I like the mirror. I like it much better than the Take A Look mirror that everyone loves. I could never get used to where to place my head to look where I want.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

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    These work pretty good for a helmet mounted mirror.

    http://aebike.com/page.cfm?PageID=30...ils&sku=MI2030

  9. #9
    Senior Member eric von zipper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erick L View Post
    That tiny picture of you made me laugh for some reason. Thanks for posting it.
    Surly Cross Check, Thorn Sherpa

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    Senior Member slowjoe66's Avatar
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    I don't ride any bike without one; commuting, touring or a weekend jaunt on the MUP. It's one of those indispensable items to me.
    I don't have a solution but I admire the problem!

  11. #11
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Yes.

    Bar end. The glasses or helmet mount ones make me dizzy for some reason.

  12. #12
    this bike is an aqueduct Matthew A Brown's Avatar
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    I am huge fan of helmet/glasses-mounted mirrors. I've tried (briefly) a few handlebar ones, but grew rapidly frustrated.

    If the mirror is mounted on your glasses or helmet, you can move your head around to change your focus. So let's say you're winding up around a hairpin. If you move your head just so, you can still see behind you. However, a handlebar mirror will change the field of view AWAY from where you need to see, when you may need to see what that logging truck is doing.

    In other words, a handlebar-mounted mirror works only if you're going straight.
    Villin custom touring | Raleigh XXIX | Medici Pro Pista | 1978 Schwinn Stingray

  13. #13
    40 yrs bike touring
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    I used a bar end mirror on my first tour long ago and was glad that I did. South of Big Sur on the California Coast I looked back and saw an RV approaching on a narrow section. The RV looked odd but I did not know why initially. When I noticed that the fold down steps were still down [like a chariot with spinning knives in the Rome Coliseum] I dove for the shoulder to let it pass safely. This taught me to always use a mirror and to check it often.

  14. #14
    jwa
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    Quote Originally Posted by cemmes View Post
    What brands and styles to people like (glasses, helmet, bar end?)
    Looks like the best type is bar end.

    No, I mean, helmet. Or, glasses-mount.

    Wait - it's the handlebar-attached kind!

    Glad that's cleared up!

  15. #15
    WATERFORD22
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    I use the velcro type which eventually wears out but attaching with zip ties on tours makes everything right with the world

  16. #16
    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
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    Several attaching options for the Mirrycle:

    http://www.calhouncycle.com/productc...p?idCategory=9
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

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    Cycled on all continents JohnyW's Avatar
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    Hi,

    20 years cycling without mirrors - and I didn't missed them. Now since April 2008 I have 2 mirrors on the bar ends. One for left hand and on for right hand traffic. On my Easter-Tour I cycled first time with mirrors - and I didn't use them much - only to see if my friends are all there and not for traffic.

    The reason why I bought them, had nothing to do this safety reasons. I just wanted to look back if the landscape is nice to shot a photo

    Thomas
    My Travelogues: http://thomasontour.de (currently only in German)

  18. #18
    Senior Member Thulsadoom's Avatar
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    My Trek 520 has bar end shifters. So the brake lever mounts have a "horn" on the top, and the rubber hood fits over it. I was able to cut back the rubber a little and drill a small hole in the aluminum horn on the left side. Then I made a little round mount/extension for a standard plastic mirror and mounted it right off the brake hood. The placement is perfect for me, the mirror is always right there, and nothing is in the way of my hands, or feels odd like the Blackburn road mirror with all the velcro. No clamps, no having to move bar tape, works real good.

  19. #19
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cemmes View Post
    I did a search on this topic and didn't come up with much. Just wondering if people like to use them on tour. If so, why? If not, why? What brands and styles to people like (glasses, helmet, bar end?)
    Do you use a mirror for other riding? I don't really see why touring would require a different preference.

    I personally don't use a mirror. I use my ears and take a look over my shoulder when required. I just ride as if I am being over taken by a car or truck at all times unless I know that I am not. I don't think it is particularly useful to do anything other than hold a steady and predictable line when vehicles are passing.

    I tend to think that even with a mirror, by the time you know for sure someone is passing too close it is too late to do anything. I hear folks say they have been forced to run off the road into a ditch when they see an overtaking vehicle that is going to hit them and I have a hard time understanding that. Around here there are a lot of cars that come up fast and close and only at the very last micro second move left. If I ran off the road every time that happened I would have broken my neck by now. I suspect that having a mirror causes these riders to overreact and actually puts them in more danger in those cases.

    Quote Originally Posted by Erick L View Post
    A nice trick on narrow roads is to ride the lane to force the cars move over and then I move closer to the road edge just before they pass, leaving a lot of room.
    I tend to think that is a bad idea. It trains drivers to expect that bikes will move right as they are passed. After a driver see this behavior a few times they are likely to pass closer. I think it is better to hold a steady line.

  20. #20
    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
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    With all due respect staephpj1, if you don't use a mirror, you don't know what it's like.
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

  21. #21
    Senior Member xilios's Avatar
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    My wife and I always use a mirror while touring. It's nice to know when that 18 wheeler is going to pass. There are times when we don't hear them, (especialy with a head wind) and they scare the hell out of us.

  22. #22
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erick L View Post
    With all due respect staephpj1, if you don't use a mirror, you don't know what it's like.
    Did I say I have never used one?

  23. #23
    Lentement mais sûrement Erick L's Avatar
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    No, but all the "if'" and I tend to think" and "I suspect" sounds like you did not. BTW, I have to use my trick once in a blue moon. I doesn't train drivers at all and it works.

    Besides, we all know that it takes a lot more to train drivers.
    Erick - www.borealphoto.com/velo

  24. #24
    Senior Member foamy's Avatar
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    I decided I might try one out. This is a MTB Myrricle (sp?) and it works fine. A glance down and I can see if anything is behind as sometimes I don't hear cars approaching due to wind noise. It's out of the way and I don't give up any hand positions.
    None.

  25. #25
    Cycled on all continents JohnyW's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I agree with all of that.

    I only moved to shoulder in Australia when a road train appears and opposite traffic appear. Then they come close and the wind (100-120 km/h) they produce is enormous. And believe me if you are not deaf you'll hear them.

    In Izmir in Turkey I was overtaken by 3-5 trucks per minute with a space of 5-10 cm in average. Where was no possibility to avoid (e.g shoulder) that. Just run on your line and don't think about it With a mirror I may would be scarred all the time...

    In all the year and countries I never had any critical situations from behind. In many countries (e.g. Egypt/Cairo) it is advisable to concentrate only on the traffic in front of you.

    I don't think that a mirror increase the safety. It just gives you the feeling that you have the traffic "under control" because you can see that's going on.

    Thomas
    My Travelogues: http://thomasontour.de (currently only in German)

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