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  1. #1
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
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    Bob Yak Questions

    I just bought a used Bob Yak trailer.

    Just the trailer, no bag.

    I took it for a test ride with a 30 lb carton of kitty litter as cargo. It seemed pretty squirmy, around turns. How should I load it? It seemed to be less squirmy when I shifted the weight back toward the Yak's wheel.

    Also, how easily should it slide onto the quick release? It seems the dropouts might be a little bent.

  2. #2
    Senior Member one_beatnik's Avatar
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    It's normal for it to be squirrelly if you load it toward the front or high. High isn't the issue here. When I've loaded mine high and forward I get the same response you have. When I've gotten it low and rear, I've done over 40 mph downhill with no problem.
    It's also normal to have to squeeze or spread just a bit to get it in. If everything is adjusted just right, though, it drops right onto the bobbins.

  3. #3
    __________ seeker333's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrCjolsen View Post
    Also, how easily should it slide onto the quick release? It seems the dropouts might be a little bent.
    You can easily bend the bob fork to fit any width dropout.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DuckFat's Avatar
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    One thing I found is that the nuts at the main hinge really need to have proper torque. I think it was 20 inch pounds (not foot pounds) if I remember correctly. If you don't have a torque wrench just put on enough torque to make the fork stay in any position if you hold the trailer vertically. You need a bit of resistance to keep the sway down (just like a real travel trailer). The fork should still move with just a bit of effort but there should definitely be some resistance to movement.

    You'll find that you'll get use to the torque of the trailer. It does make starting out and standing on the pedals a bit dicey but you'll get used to it as you use the trailer more.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
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    I straightened the dropouts a little and it mounts and unmounts a lot easier.

    Here's another question. If I ride it on the road, will higher pressure tires make a difference? I know that 100 psi and 45 psi makes a pretty big difference in rolling resistance on a bike, what about on a yak?

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    You need the vibration dampening effect of a low pressure tire to better ensure that the BOB stays put on bumpy decents. The lower rolling resistance of a high pressure tire is not going to make much difference, while losing it on a bump on a downhill will ruin your trip...

  7. #7
    Bike Nerd Mr. Jim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrCjolsen View Post
    I straightened the dropouts a little and it mounts and unmounts a lot easier.

    Here's another question. If I ride it on the road, will higher pressure tires make a difference? I know that 100 psi and 45 psi makes a pretty big difference in rolling resistance on a bike, what about on a yak?
    I have the similar and out of production Yakima Big Tow. Over time the trailer fork became bent where it goes over the skewer, a little work with a vise straightened them out. As for the tire, I went to a slightly higher pressure smooth tire over the knobby one that was on it. Since I was on a road bike and sticking to pavement this was a good choice for me. Seemed to roll a bit better, did increase the amount of trailer bounce on cracks and stuff so it is kind of a trade off. Personally I think that having a knobby tire on these trailers adds nothing but style points and would go with a smooth one whatever the tire pressure.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclesafe View Post
    You need the vibration dampening effect of a low pressure tire to better ensure that the BOB stays put on bumpy decents. The lower rolling resistance of a high pressure tire is not going to make much difference, while losing it on a bump on a downhill will ruin your trip...
    There are no bumpy descents where I live. No descents, for that matter.

  9. #9
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    How about pot holes....

  10. #10
    Senior Member Old Hammer Boy's Avatar
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    All of the above is good info. Load low and towards the rear if possible. If you aren't attaching it this way, you may want to try it. I like to stand backwards to my bike, straddling my back wheel, just behind the saddle. I grab the fork of the BoB, guide it onto the bobbins, snap the wire stays in place, and voila' it's done. Takes about 10-15 seconds, tops...

    After riding with the BoB, day after day, You'll find your rig feels more stable with the loaded BoB following you. You'll get used to the third kerrr-bump, and it will become your best friend.

  11. #11
    Bike4Peace Vernon Huffman's Avatar
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    If you're going out on the road with the Bob, take some extra wire stays. I've lost them and had to figure out how to build them from broken spokes. You can do it, but it's probably easier to carry spares.
    ---------------------------------------------+
    | __o CONTINENTAL CRITICAL MASS
    | _`\;,_ plan to ride from home
    | (*)/ (*) CONVERGE ON WASHINGTON, DC
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    | b4p.bbnow.org/
    ---------------------------------------------+

  12. #12
    Senior Member MrCjolsen's Avatar
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    The guy who sold it to me gave me some wire stays made from broken spokes.

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