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  1. #1
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    disc fork spacing question - and your recommendations appreciated

    i am a newby when it comes to discs

    I am specing a mootour TI touring bile withn disc brakes. On the rear the spacing is 135mm, using a chris kink ISO disc hub. on this bike we are using 700c rims front and back.

    the question is about the front fork I should use for disc brakes. I understand that the 135mm spacing on the rear will allow for a wheel to be built without dishing it to allow for the disc.

    on the front, are the dishing issues the same? should the dropout spacing be 135mm for a hub like a chris king ISO disc front hub? (also 135mm I think).


    and if so, how about recommending a high end lightweight touring fork with disc tabs for 700c wheels.
    2009 Custom TI Frame Road Bike, all 2007 Campy Record, Campy Euros Wheelset
    2009 Custom TI Frame touring Bike. S&S couplers, XTR Drivetrain. LOW granny.
    2009 Performance Bicycles TI (by Lynsky) road frame, 7900 DA, 7950 DA Compact Crank, Light Niobium Rim Wheels

  2. #2
    cyclopath vik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbpence View Post
    how about recommending a high end lightweight touring fork with disc tabs for 700c wheels.
    A disc fork needs to be very stiff to resist the forces from the disc brake. This makes for an uncomfortable ride on rough surfaces. You can compensate somewhat by running a wider low pressure tire, but this will have a performance penalty.

    A curved rim brake fork, like on the LHT, can be strong yet absorb vibration nicely from the road - however, then you'll need to use v-brakes or cantis on the front.

    If you are a newby when it comes to discs you may want to reconsider your choice. They add cost, complexity and weight to your bike and don't provide any radical improvement over v-brakes. I've been running both v-brakes and discs since they became available. I am a tech geek and wanted to like discs better, but over the years have come to realize v-brakes are as good or better than discs for most applications. Winter/wet commuting and MTBing are the exceptions.
    Last edited by vik; 09-09-08 at 08:02 AM.
    safe riding - Vik
    VikApproved

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    vik:

    thanks for the advice. the topic is about which forks, not whether to use discs. I DO apprecicate your comments, but:

    I misspoke in my OP. I am not a newby to using discs, I am a newby to the idea of specing a bike for them. your points questioning my decision to use discs completely misses the reason I want them. For many, there IS an advantage using discs, and that reason is that these people are suffering from severe RSI hand issues.

    I do a lot of long (sometime 7-8 miles) descents pulling an extrawheel tailer on washed out dirt forest service roads. my hands simply cannot take it. I am a musician and need to protect my hands. discs do not require such a strong pull. my disc equipped bike is a dream descending under these contitions, but I dont wish to tour using a 30 pound, fully suspended MTB.

    the weight and reliability issues are not as important as continuing to be able to play guitar. the dishing of the front wheel doesn't bother me either, because I am not using front panniers, so only my handlebar bag is on the front (less than ten pounds fully loaded)

    -----------------
    so I have since learned that the front fork spacing is 100mm.

    ok - so anyone want to address my OP which ended with

    how about recommending a high end lightweight touring fork with disc tabs for 700c wheels.
    Last edited by jbpence; 09-09-08 at 08:41 AM.
    2009 Custom TI Frame Road Bike, all 2007 Campy Record, Campy Euros Wheelset
    2009 Custom TI Frame touring Bike. S&S couplers, XTR Drivetrain. LOW granny.
    2009 Performance Bicycles TI (by Lynsky) road frame, 7900 DA, 7950 DA Compact Crank, Light Niobium Rim Wheels

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