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  1. #1
    LitePacking
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    Eating the fish you catch? (the fish-tread,fish equipment tread)

    "Eating the fish you catch" What i tried to say was.. The fish you catch!

    To keep weight and the use of money into a minimum to keep the length of tour going i have to be a bit nazi in the food ways, its also healthy.
    Just need a fire and some pepper and maybe a slice of bread to make it taste way better than McDonalds.
    Catching a good trout or salmon is always a pleasure on a tiny rod.

    What could be the ultimate lightweight equipment to have on a bicycle?
    And what size of the line if you want to use the line in fresh and saltwater?
    I would suggest a 0,25- 0,30mm Fireline and very very light Shimano equipment to use in both fresh and salt water. And maybe a telescopic Daiwa rod, the chinese made Daiwa rod because of the one single unit and the functionality.

    What about a small-table under your back-rack that you could just push out and clean the fish on?, because you need a place to slice it and a sharp knife?

    Experienced people that eat self catches fishes or people that have ideas in general about this i like to hear from!
    Last edited by LitePacking; 09-27-08 at 06:13 PM. Reason: wrong spelling:)

  2. #2
    LitePacking
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    Is everybody eating on the drive-true?

    Catching your meal on tour is a win-win situation.

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    If you are going to be eating a lot of fish, check with the state's EPA about consumption advisories for toxins in certain fish caught in certain bodies of water. http://www.epa.state.oh.us/dsw/fisha...imitmeals.html
    http://www.epa.state.oh.us/dsw/fisha...y/overall.html

  4. #4
    Twincities MN kuan's Avatar
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    Depends on where you are I suppose. I don't like my fish cooked, and freshwater fish doesn't taste good raw.

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    I had a fly rod with me on my tours in northern CA and near Bozeman, MT and did a decent amount of fishing, but didn't eat much fish. If I were fishing to eat, I'd probably bring a spinner and bait, but personally I think that's cheating. If you want to fish for food, stop at the supermarket, it's a lot easier.

  6. #6
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LitePacking View Post
    "Eating the fish you catch" What i tried to say was.. The fish you catch!

    To keep weight and the use of money into a minimum to keep the length of tour going i have to be a bit nazi in the food ways, its also healthy.
    Just need a fire and some pepper and maybe a slice of bread to make it taste way better than McDonalds.
    Catching a good trout or salmon is always a pleasure on a tiny rod.

    What could be the ultimate lightweight equipment to have on a bicycle?
    And what size of the line if you want to use the line in fresh and saltwater?
    I would suggest a 0,25- 0,30mm Fireline and very very light Shimano equipment to use in both fresh and salt water. And maybe a telescopic Daiwa rod, the chinese made Daiwa rod because of the one single unit and the functionality.

    What about a small-table under your back-rack that you could just push out and clean the fish on?, because you need a place to slice it and a sharp knife?

    Experienced people that eat self catches fishes or people that have ideas in general about this i like to hear from!
    There are a couple of issues with this. First, you need to have a license for fishing in every state you are going to be riding through. If you don't then you are poaching which is not only against the law but just plain wrong.*

    Second - and this is just personal preference - a fish in the water is far more valuable than a fish in the pan. You can catch the one in the water over and over but one in the pan is gone forever. I haven't killed a fish in 15 years. They are just too precious to me


    *As an avid fly fisherman, I consider poachers to be the lowest form of life there is. A license is very cheap and there is no reason to take any kind of wildlife without paying for the privilege. There is no penalty too severe for a poacher!
    Stuart Black
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    Senior Member wheel's Avatar
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    LOL Bear bait

    do it do it.

    Try the mushrooms while you're at it.

  8. #8
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    OP, but you'll starve. You'd be better off relying on road kill.

    Here in Australia, as I suspect in North America, fishing guides are paid big money to take clients to rivers and lakes where they are "guaranteed" to catch a fish. The warranty, of course, is void, if they don't catch one, which is often.

    I spent quite a long time in my teens fishing in the Central Highlands with my father. I wasn't very good at it, as I didn't catch any in all that time. He wasn't much better, catching just one. But I darned well enjoyed the experience!

    I took hooks, a line and sinkers on my first long tour that was to traverse (dry) rivers and (very isolated) coastal areas. I didn't use it once. I later found out that the coastal area (the head of the Great Australian Bight) doesn't have much in the way of fish because of the nature of the currents and undersea topography.

    I tips me hat to cyccommute. Catch-and-return is a philosophy that was cultivated here in Australia by a very popular TV personality with his own fishing show (he was a football player then footy commentator, go figure).

    When you're desperate for a feed, I think the stuff you bring on the back of the bike will provide the solution faster than dropping a line.

    Good idea on the cleaning board. Or not. On the offchance you do get lucky, why don't you just clean it on the bank or grass. Fish scales and guts have a habit of starting to smell the place out after a while.

    Sorry, but facts of life often get in the way of a romantic idea.
    Last edited by Rowan; 09-28-08 at 03:30 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Can I suggest you do a google search on "through fishing" or "thru-fishing". You might get some more information useful to you.

    cycomute, I'm not sure why there's such a big difference between a recreational fisherman with a licence and one without - surely taking a few trout dosen't compare with the devastation caused by large-scale and often legal driftnet and bottom-clearing fishing, or commercial-scale fishing of endangered fisheries. I know that around here, there's no educational requirement or credentialling, you just pay your $35 or whatever it is these days and off you go.

    Maybe the idea is that if you have a money threshold, you will limit the number of people who casually fish and therefore you decrease the overall impact.

    I hope your freshwater river and lake systems are healthier than ours; I'm not sure there is any role for freshwater fishing in southern Australia with the kinds of environmental strains we're under at the moment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LitePacking View Post
    Is everybody eating on the drive-true?

    Catching your meal on tour is a win-win situation.
    The last thing I want to do at the end of a long day, when I am tired, sweaty and hungry is to worry about catching my dinner. Besides (to me) a big part of touring is sampling the local food. I would have really missed out on my past tours had I made a decision to cook on my own.

    I agree with cyclecommunte in that you would need a license for every state visited. This could be expensive and time consuming to obtain the licenses. But I have the exact opposite view on fish. They were put here for us to eat. I'm going to eat store bought meat / fish anyway so I might as well eat what I catch. And a fish in the pan is more valuable than a fish in the stream, because you are going to go hungry until it gets in your pan.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

    Albert Einstein

  11. #11
    Twincities MN kuan's Avatar
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    Reading these posts reminds me of a friend who thought he could live off the fish in the boundary waters. Idiot almost starved to death in his seven days there!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cave View Post
    cycomute, I'm not sure why there's such a big difference between a recreational fisherman with a licence and one without - surely taking a few trout dosen't compare with the devastation caused by large-scale and often legal driftnet and bottom-clearing fishing, or commercial-scale fishing of endangered fisheries.
    In the US, most fishing is freshwater. And an awful lot of that freshwater is stocked fish. Licensing fees pay for the stocking. And if you happen to catch something that is native... odds are there are rules about how big or small the fish can be for it to be a legal kill. In some cases, most *especially* for certain kinds of trout, the fish are endangered or threatened. Rainbow trout breeds well in captivity, and is used in a lot of stocking programs. Most other American trout species are in very bad shape. So if you can't tell the difference, it's a bad idea to catch trout.

    And the native populations vary wildly. Every place I've fished, sunfish have been fair game. But that's only a couple of states... and all the other common fish were different. It's well worth the trouble to get a license, and to learn about the area where you're fishing.

  13. #13
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cave View Post
    Can I suggest you do a google search on "through fishing" or "thru-fishing". You might get some more information useful to you.

    cycomute, I'm not sure why there's such a big difference between a recreational fisherman with a licence and one without - surely taking a few trout dosen't compare with the devastation caused by large-scale and often legal driftnet and bottom-clearing fishing, or commercial-scale fishing of endangered fisheries. I know that around here, there's no educational requirement or credentialling, you just pay your $35 or whatever it is these days and off you go.

    Maybe the idea is that if you have a money threshold, you will limit the number of people who casually fish and therefore you decrease the overall impact.

    I hope your freshwater river and lake systems are healthier than ours; I'm not sure there is any role for freshwater fishing in southern Australia with the kinds of environmental strains we're under at the moment.
    In the 1860s Colorado streams teamed with a native trout that lived in every body of water flowing or standing in the state. The miners would 'fish' for them with dynamite, load them into wagons and sell them at markets in Denver. No one had to have a license until early in the 20th Century so catching, and killing, hundreds of fish per outing was the norm. By the 1890s, the native trout had all but disappeared and was thought to be extinct until some were found in high country waters in the last 30 years.

    Similar wildlife uses have decimated turkeys, elk, bison (that was the US governments doing), deer, big horn sheep, prong horns, prairie chickens, sage grouse, ducks, geese, grizzly bears, wolves, etc. The list goes on and on. Licensing, seasons and bag limits were put in place so that future generations could enjoy hunting or even seeing those animals. Most of them have rebounded but others - grizzly, wolf and bison - will never be seen roaming free in the state.

    Colorado waters and, to a lesser extent, the land is filled with nonnative species that can out compete the natives because of lessened predatory pressure. Each of those fish had to be put there by someone after the natives were driven out. And lots of them have to keep being put back because they can't propagate. This cost money and that money is raised by the agencies that issue licenses. Without them, our waters would be bare and our land would have greatly reduced wildlife herds. I have no problem with paying for a fishing license (hardly onerous at $30 per year).

    However, if 1 person takes a fish without a license...poaching...that hardly causes any problem but if they do it every day of the year that 365 fish that have died. If 100 people do it, that 36,500 fish. 1000 people: 365,000. That then becomes a huge impact. Just like other laws, a reasonable person can see that they are there for a purpose and will comply with them. Unreasonable ones should be punished.

    As you can see, I value my fish Every one I catch...and release...is a living jewel. How could I eat them?

    Last edited by cyccommute; 09-28-08 at 10:23 AM.
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    I love to fish as well, but I let them all go for the next fisherman.

    As a kid, I did tour on my bike and eat fish I caught. It isn't a bad idea if your planning a short local tour that goes to a river or lake that's likely to produce fish. I still do hike and fish trips to remote lakes-- it's a lot of fun. But I's take plenty of extra food even if I was going to eat any fish I might catch.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Gotte's Avatar
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    cyccocommute, nice fish. My friend and I fish in the Peak District in the UK, only on reservoirs, I'm affraid - there are no really good trout rivers here. We do take them, but they're rainbows - farmed, and we were told by one of the members of the fly club that if they have a poor summer's catch, they tend to find starved trout dead on the shore at the start of spring. If I did fish a good river for wild brownies I'd definately let them go - they are too beautiful to kill.

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    If you ever want to see that fish again around me,you better take a picture.I'm no fisherman,so if it jumps on my hook and is not endangered,it dinner time.I catch every one I point at in the store case.
    Last edited by Booger1; 09-28-08 at 02:28 PM.
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    I, too, am a fly fisherman. Heck, I've been fishing since I could hang onto a pole. But I also was raised eating the fish we caught. And I like fresh fish, especially Walleye, Bluegill and yes Trout. But I only keep a couple once in awhile. All the others go back in the water.

    But I respect and understand your opinion cyccommute and that is a real nice trout, bet it was a grand battle on a fly rod!!!!! 4 wt or 5 wt?
    Don't worry about life, you're not going to survive it anyway.

  18. #18
    I live in a bicycle. smovlov's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    However, if 1 person takes a fish without a license...poaching...that hardly causes any problem but if they do it every day of the year that 365 fish that have died. If 100 people do it, that 36,500 fish. 1000 people: 365,000. That then becomes a huge impact. Just like other laws, a reasonable person can see that they are there for a purpose and will comply with them. Unreasonable ones should be punished.
    I have a question...

    Whats the difference between the 1000 "poachers" that take one fish a day, and the 1000 reasonable people that pay for their "right" to take a fish a day? The impact is the same. The only difference I see is that your local government got a little jingle in their pocket. If I'm not mistaken that would be $30,000 for all those licensed fishermen. I know they also use those licenses to bring up a tally on how many people are taking fish (assuming you don't practice C&R) for conservation. We have the same problems here in Florida. I just think it is a little ridiculous the amount of government in our lives that's all.

  19. #19
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smovlov View Post
    I have a question...

    Whats the difference between the 1000 "poachers" that take one fish a day, and the 1000 reasonable people that pay for their "right" to take a fish a day? The impact is the same. The only difference I see is that your local government got a little jingle in their pocket. If I'm not mistaken that would be $30,000 for all those licensed fishermen. I know they also use those licenses to bring up a tally on how many people are taking fish (assuming you don't practice C&R) for conservation. We have the same problems here in Florida. I just think it is a little ridiculous the amount of government in our lives that's all.
    The difference, in Colorado at least, is that license fees are the only revenue used for wildlife and fishing expenditures. General fund money is not used for those activities. So if someone takes $30,000 worth of fish without paying for it (and poachers take many more than a fish per day), there is nothing in the till to put those fish back...everyone loses for the greed of a few. But heck that seems to happen whenever the government is 'gotten off our backs'. How many zeros are in 700 billion?
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    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gotte View Post
    cyccocommute, nice fish. My friend and I fish in the Peak District in the UK, only on reservoirs, I'm affraid - there are no really good trout rivers here. We do take them, but they're rainbows - farmed, and we were told by one of the members of the fly club that if they have a poor summer's catch, they tend to find starved trout dead on the shore at the start of spring. If I did fish a good river for wild brownies I'd definately let them go - they are too beautiful to kill.
    That one was actually a trout from a lake. It sits at around 12,000 feet and is a glacial tarn. And that was a little one
    Stuart Black
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    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadKarma62 View Post
    I, too, am a fly fisherman. Heck, I've been fishing since I could hang onto a pole. But I also was raised eating the fish we caught. And I like fresh fish, especially Walleye, Bluegill and yes Trout. But I only keep a couple once in awhile. All the others go back in the water.

    But I respect and understand your opinion cyccommute and that is a real nice trout, bet it was a grand battle on a fly rod!!!!! 4 wt or 5 wt?
    3 wt Scott. I've caught a 25 incher in the same lake with the same rod. I love that rod I have a 2 wt Loomis that is use for brookies and bluegills. I found that one while riding home from work, along with another rod, 2 reels and a case.
    Stuart Black
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    "Maybe the idea is that if you have a money threshold, you will limit the number of people who casually fish and therefore you decrease the overall impact."

    The idea is that the government likes the money, and if they consult at all, they ask organizations of joiners, who happily trade off the rights of the casual fisherman who doesn't joint their organization.

    I've been a catch and release fisherman for 40 years, and a fly fisherman for 35. Used to tie flies and make rods for money around the time I was in university, make bamboo rods these days, though not for the last several years.

    The whole idea of catch and release is to produce sufficient stock to allow a larger industry to flourish. One person's, too valuable fish, is another person's meal. There is more money in the industrialized fly fishing so that gets the nod from a lot of people. It's a blood sport like cock fighting that has seen a lot of damage in the form of intentional spreading of non-native genes, dilution of resident genes, spread of disease, and individual messing around with sentient living creatures. But that's what it is, and I still love it.

    There are very few fisheries than can create interesting fishing experiences from natural production. Educated trout, along with a kill. High yield fisheries tend to be boring, though it is something to get the blood going in the early season.

    Catch and release is just a step on the way to the next form which will likely be some form of privitization, or limited access. All it does is increase the number of fishermen a resource can support, over time the impact is too great on the fish, and one is back to a loosing proposition. Not everywhere, for every species, but it isn't a complete fix.

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    But I don't like SPAM... BadKarma62's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    3 wt Scott. I've caught a 25 incher in the same lake with the same rod. I love that rod I have a 2 wt Loomis that is use for brookies and bluegills. I found that one while riding home from work, along with another rod, 2 reels and a case.
    I don't have the trout resources here that you have, but we have some very good 'bow and browns. But my fav overall is a school of 'gills about the size of your hand or a bit bigger. Let me tell ya, if bluegill got over 6 or 7 pounds, you'd need deep sea rigs to catch them. And you ain't had fun until you've hooked a 7 pound largemouth on a 5 wt flyrod.

    Wish I could go shopping in the ditch.

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    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    I don't see how you will be carrying less weight by fishing. That part of your premise makes zero sense to me. Whatever weight you carry in fishing gear it is more than you carry without unless you travel where you have to carry all your food supplies rather than restocking daily or at least every few days.

    I agree on the license thing, but think that it makes no sense to fish if you are not going to eat the fish.

    Off topic and personal opinion but... Catch and release makes zero sense to me. I figure that if you don't want to eat them it is better to leave them alone. I try not to be too critical of those who practice catch and release unless they are all preachy and act superior about it though. To me the guy who legally catches a few fish to eat, is on the higher moral ground than the guy who fishes for the sport only. Different strokes though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smovlov View Post
    I have a question...

    Whats the difference between the 1000 "poachers" that take one fish a day, and the 1000 reasonable people that pay for their "right" to take a fish a day? The impact is the same. The only difference I see is that your local government got a little jingle in their pocket. If I'm not mistaken that would be $30,000 for all those licensed fishermen. I know they also use those licenses to bring up a tally on how many people are taking fish (assuming you don't practice C&R) for conservation. We have the same problems here in Florida. I just think it is a little ridiculous the amount of government in our lives that's all.
    I have to agree with you here man. That sucks that in colorado the only revenue for fish conservation comes from fishing licnses from people who i think mostly want to kill the fish. and all this when we're about to bail out wall street a-holes with 700bil+ tax payer money. Maybe the best thing would be to take political action to get more money spent on wildlife conservation and less on military bull**** (which is where way over 50% of our taxes go.) I'm not much of a hunter/fisher... but as long as it's done with respect and you are only taking enough to satisfy your needs - not dynamiting to make some huge profit at the market - then i think that's part of being in harmony with nature. All life comes from other life.

    I also am pretty sick of the government meddling in every part of our lives and requiring us to pay a fee for the simplest things. "Public land" doesn't really seem to belong to us anymore... not unless we have lots of money to pay all the usage fees.

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