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Old 10-15-08, 09:06 PM   #1
BengeBoy 
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New 26-inch wheel touring bike from Co-Motion

Co-Motion of Oregon introduced a new 26-inch wheel touring bike, the Pangea, at Interbike, positioned as an all-continent expedition tourer.

Frame and fork=$1835...choice of conventional brake set-up or discs.

Complete bikes from $3545.

http://www.co-motion.com/single_bikes/pangea.html


That gives Co-Motion 3 single touring bikes:
- Pangea
- Americano (w/the rugged tandem rear hub)
- Nor'Wester.

Just fyi; I have no connection w/Co-Motion but if you'd like to buy me one, I'd be happy to take it...

bb
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Old 10-15-08, 09:16 PM   #2
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Comotion makes great bikes, and the 26 inch wheel will have a lot of utility for persons looking to travel anywhere beyond the U.S., Canada, and Europe. My LHT has 26" wheels, and I have been truly grateful for the same while riding in Mexico and having to shop a new tire.

That said, I wonder if there is a big enough market for such a high end niche tourer? I guess time will tell. I can't justify spending 3600 for a new tourer, but if I could, I would definitely be interested.
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Old 10-15-08, 11:33 PM   #3
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Not sure where they get the description of it as a bike with an upright position, the bars are lower than the seat by quite a few inches! It's a good direction though.
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Old 10-16-08, 05:48 AM   #4
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Handsome bike, but it's a lot of money for no Rohloff or suspension...
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Old 10-16-08, 06:57 AM   #5
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Considering that new, off the shelf road bikes go for much, much more and tourers like BG's, Waterford's, etc. go for about the same price—it's in the ball-park. That and it's built to your sizing... the price is about right.

I wouldn't consider suspension for a third-world tourer.
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Old 10-16-08, 07:01 AM   #6
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I wouldn't consider suspension for a third-world tourer.
There are some pretty bad roads in the third-world...
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Old 10-16-08, 07:16 AM   #7
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There are some pretty bad roads in the third-world...
I was thinking repair-ability.
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Old 10-16-08, 07:28 AM   #8
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Yep, I wondered about the same thing before my trip, but fell on the side of suspension and I'm *very* glad I did because some of the roads were like trying to ride up a dry river bed. Now I'm so attached to the suspension I reckon I'd leave it on for any future tour. Maybe. The bike's more versatile with suspension fitted. It might also be slower and a bit heavier, but that's not a problem for me.

(note - it's spring suspension, not air...)
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Old 10-16-08, 07:47 AM   #9
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FYI on prices -

Co-Motion's 2008 price on the Norwester touring bike was $1,595; now its $1,685, so they've raised prices just a bit.

By comparison, a Rodriguez (www.rodcycle.com) touring bike + fork is $1495, and their 26-inch wheel, S&S coupler equipped expedition touring frame is $1995.
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Old 10-16-08, 08:52 AM   #10
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Co-Motion of Oregon introduced a new 26-inch wheel touring bike, the Pangea, at Interbike, positioned as an all-continent expedition tourer.

Frame and fork=$1835...

bb
Is the frame and fork really > 4 X better than a stock LHT?
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Old 10-16-08, 10:05 AM   #11
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Is the frame and fork really > 4 X better than a stock LHT?

You have the mass-produced frames and complete bikes at one price range (Surly, Novara Randonee, Fuji Touring, Cannondale, etc.).

You have the semi-custom, small-volume producers at another price range, about $1500 to $2000 for frame and work (Co-Motion, Rodriguez, Bruce Gordon, etc.).

You have some titanium and very high end steel bikes at an even higher price range $2000 + to $3000 for frame and work (Moots, Seven, Independent Fabrication, etc.).


It's nice to have choices for people who feel they need them.
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Old 10-16-08, 12:20 PM   #12
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You tell`em, Benge Boy.

Since I have to explain my purchases to the boss, I stick with equipment (bikes and otherwise) that makes sense and isn`t extravagent. If I were absolutely rolling in the dough, or even if I were still single and my crazy purchases didn`t cut into somebody else`s money, I`d probably blow the extra money on a high end bike. Just because. So, sure- it`s expensive, but a "stable" of nice bikes still doesn`t add up to the price of a garage full of motorcycles, ATVs, snowmobiles, etc. A lot of people with $5000 toys in thier garages think I`m crazy to have from $250 to $1600 invested in each of our (between my wife and I) four bikes. And if you can`t afford the Como or the Waterford or BG, there are always LHTs, Randonees and Stumpjumper conversions which will do the job just fine. Yup, nice to have choices.
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Old 10-16-08, 12:22 PM   #13
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Benge, I have no problem with more expensive materials warranting a higher price but this frame is welded cro moly steel and not beautifully sculpted lugged or titanium. Call me cheap but $1800 seems like a lot of $ for 6 lbs of steel.

Last edited by robow; 10-16-08 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 10-16-08, 12:36 PM   #14
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And while we're at it... what does 'semi-custom' mean?

However! I absolutely agree with Rodar - there are lots of MUCH more extravagant toys on the road, and lots of not-so-extravagant-but-never-used toys in garages. Who's to say how much one should spend on love?
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Old 10-16-08, 12:45 PM   #15
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$3500 is a lot of scratch for a bike, no matter what the purpose. Heck, some folks think of $1100 for a touring bike as an extravagance. I can tell that some of the components are higher quality / more expensive than an LHT (e.g. Chris King headset) but not 100% sure about all of them.

As to whether this is too expensive, I think it really depends on your disposable income.
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Old 10-16-08, 01:36 PM   #16
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You tell`em, Benge Boy.
Just to clarify -- I am not trying to justify the price of this bike, I am just saying that if one looks out at the current marketplace, these are the prices that one pays.
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Old 10-16-08, 01:42 PM   #17
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And while we're at it... what does 'semi-custom' mean?
I don't know if "semi-custom" means anything to anyone else , but since I used it, here's what I mean:

Co-Motion and Rodriguez are two examples of higher-end, specialty bike makers who advertise a standard configuration of frames and bikes (I think Bilenky might be another one). While they are very low volume, I think for the most part they can turn around a bike that fits their standard specs pretty quickly (weeks, not months).

If you want to then start customizing -- extra braze-ons, fancy colors, tweaking geometry, Rohloff hubs -- they will charge you extra. It likely will take more time, too. I think Rodriguez charges something like $200 for a "custom" geometry; Co-Motion's charge is something like $300.

So clearly you have a lot more flexibility than with a standard, mass-produced bike (Trek, REI, Surly). But you will pay a bit less than going a "full custom" bike where someone is starting essentially with a blank sheet of paper.
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