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  1. #1
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    Need advice on new shoes and pedals

    Hi, I recently bought the revolution country traveller and I am looking at adding pedals and buying shoes. I am not clued up at all on what type of shoes to buy and pedals. I was told by someone the best pedals for touring would probably be time, is that right? as the give 5 degrees, so better for the knees.

    I am a uk size 10, would I be better buying online or in a shop? Any advice would be great.

    Remember I am from the UK.

    Cheers

    Paul

    Should probably add that I have never used the shoes with pedal clips before; complete beginner. Also not wanting to spend more than £100 on the combination.
    Last edited by ptyson23; 10-26-08 at 10:29 AM.

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    http://www.rivbike.com/article/clothing/the_shoes_ruse

    I use MKS touring pedals and whatever shoes I feel like wearing.

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    consider shimano spd sandles plus sealskin water proof socks,oh and check out chainreaction site for best price.

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    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    If you're just getting started, I'd say stick with standard pedals for now, and just use a nice and comfortable shoe (or sandal) with a reasonably stiff sole. I happen to prefer the feel of clipless, but don't regard it as super-critical.

    If you're going to go clipless, SPD's with a recessed cleat are a good option. You can walk fairly easily, as opposed to the larger cleats.

  5. #5
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    Cool well on my old bike I had to clips but now I wanna get the shoes that clip into the pedals for touring. What you recommend? What do you mean by clipless? Really I just want something that is comfotable over long durations and improve the efficency of my cycling.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    Twincities MN kuan's Avatar
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    Find a shoe you like. I get mine sized like running shoes, at least a half size too large, with lots of room in the toe area. For touring you don't really need super rigid shoes, carbon or ratcheting anything. A basic shoe with laces and maybe nice insoles for walking will work fine.

    I use Crank Brothers Smarty pedals. IMO the easiest to clip in and clip out. No springs on the cleats and two way clip in. (they say four, but it's really two) Cheap and good.

  7. #7
    bragi bragi's Avatar
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    Personally, I think clip-in pedals (called clipless for some reason) are vastly overrated, and very inconvenient in some instances, like heavy stop & go traffic or very rough single-track. I find that their performance is identical to platform pedals on flat ground and only slightly better uphill; this very slight advantage is not worth the aggravation while riding, or the very pronounced limitations of the special shoes you have to wear. I prefer pedals with a large surface area and little studs that keep your feet from slipping off; that way, you can wear whatever shoes you want and are still able to crank up hills respectably in wet weather.

    That said, if you insist on clip-in pedals, and a lot of tourers do, take a look at SPD; at least they're fairly simple to get into and out of, and the cleats are more or less recessed, which makes you sound like less of a horse when you're walking around on pavement.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  8. #8
    dia por dia El Pelon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bragi View Post
    Personally, I think clip-in pedals (called clipless for some reason) are vastly overrated, and very inconvenient in some instances, like heavy stop & go traffic or very rough single-track. . .

    I find quite the opposite to be true. I much prefer riding clipless, and in tight single track, prefer to be fastened on so that I can pedal through the obstacles.

    Different strokes for different folks . . . .

    I am using Time MTB pedals and Sidi MTB shoes on my tourer, and love them. The MTB shoe allows for easier walking, and better traction when you have to dismount off the road. On my roadbike, I run Bebops and love the float. I will probably go back to Speedplays when they wear out . . . Bebops are no longer being made. :-(
    Dia por dia.

  9. #9
    bragi bragi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Pelon View Post
    I find quite the opposite to be true. I much prefer riding clipless, and in tight single track, prefer to be fastened on so that I can pedal through the obstacles.

    Different strokes for different folks . . . .

    I am using Time MTB pedals and Sidi MTB shoes on my tourer, and love them. The MTB shoe allows for easier walking, and better traction when you have to dismount off the road. On my roadbike, I run Bebops and love the float. I will probably go back to Speedplays when they wear out . . . Bebops are no longer being made. :-(

    I agree that, if you're going to go with clip-in pedals, MTB shoes are vastly superior. They're way better for walking (and touring does involve a certain amount of walking around), and for for pushing off the ground when you're still on the bike (and sometimes you need to do that, too). Plus, they make you look like less of a ballerina when you go into a pub.
    If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

  10. #10
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bragi View Post
    Personally, I think clip-in pedals (called clipless for some reason)
    Because they don't have clips
    are vastly overrated, and very inconvenient in some instances, like heavy stop & go traffic or very rough single-track.
    I find them way more convenient in heavy traffic. They are much easier to get in and out compared to clips and you don't need to tighten the straps and loosen the straps.
    I find that their performance is identical to platform pedals on flat ground and only slightly better uphill; this very slight advantage is not worth the aggravation while riding, or the very pronounced limitations of the special shoes you have to wear.
    I agree, as long as the foot is attached to the pedals, the performance is the same. But I find clipless to be safer, since I don't have to loosen the straps to get my foot out. I also find clipless more comfortable. With clips I have to tighten the straps pretty tight or my foot will slip out while pulling backwards. Also, clips don't allow any float or very little. For longer rides, I go clipless. For rides where I want to wear normal sneakers, I pull out the platforms. But this is only on shorter rides because of the lack of float.
    I prefer pedals with a large surface area and little studs that keep your feet from slipping off; that way, you can wear whatever shoes you want and are still able to crank up hills respectably in wet weather.

    That said, if you insist on clip-in pedals, and a lot of tourers do, take a look at SPD; at least they're fairly simple to get into and out of, and the cleats are more or less recessed, which makes you sound like less of a horse when you're walking around on pavement.
    I do like SPD pedals and shoes. Shimano has a touring shoe, but I can't seem to find a link. It's built more like a road shoe, but has the recessed SPD cleat and a smooth rubber sole for walking. Nashbar has a Shimano shoe that I like for commuting.

  11. #11
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    a lot to take in

    Cool guys, a lot of info there and a lot to take in. Going to the bike shop today so I'll have a word with the guys there. Seems like SPD's are favoured, whatever they are,lol. and then just chose a shoe that is comfortable, and I suppose that is where shopping online for cheaper shoes aint an option. I was in the bike shop last week and the guy recommended the pedals with clips on one side and just the pedal on the other so you could use both bike shoes and normal.

  12. #12
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Pelon View Post
    I find quite the opposite to be true. I much prefer riding clipless, and in tight single track, prefer to be fastened on so that I can pedal through the obstacles.
    +1

    I never understood why people feel safer or more in control when not clipped in. I originally started using clipless pedals specifically for riding tight singletrack. I clip in and stay clipped in until a nanosecond before I put my foot down.

    I like SPD pedals for touring and prefer the lower priced Sidi Bullet 2 shoes rather than the pricier Dominators.

    I always wear my bike shoes and clip in to ride when touring. The only time I don't when on tour is if I ride a couple hundred yards in camp or something. For that distance I can manage to ride in my crocs even on the clipless pedals.

  13. #13
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheik_Yerbouti View Post
    http://www.rivbike.com/article/clothing/the_shoes_ruse

    I use MKS touring pedals and whatever shoes I feel like wearing.
    IMO... Anything on the Rivendell sight should be taken with a grain of salt.

  14. #14
    Twincities MN kuan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SweetLou View Post

    I find them way more convenient in heavy traffic. They are much easier to get in and out compared to clips and you don't need to tighten the straps and loosen the straps.
    Really. I was exploring Fort Wayne IN once and came across this "secret" area where a bunch of kids had built a bunch of jumps. I went to twist my foot to unclip and realized that I had these straps on. Went to reach down to undo the strap but was too late. I fell over. It was embarassing to say the least.

  15. #15
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kuan View Post
    Really. I was exploring Fort Wayne IN once and came across this "secret" area where a bunch of kids had built a bunch of jumps. I went to twist my foot to unclip and realized that I had these straps on. Went to reach down to undo the strap but was too late. I fell over. It was embarassing to say the least.
    Correct, that is what I am saying. Clipless is easier because you don't need to release the strap, there are no straps. I just rotate my heels out and my foot is free. Getting the foot in is easier, if you have double sided or quad sided pedals. Just put the foot on the pedal and push. No need to then reach down and tighten the strap.

  16. #16
    Senior Member foamy's Avatar
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    SpeedPlay Frogs. Unlimited float. Double sided. Step on it and you're in—twist your ankle outboard and you're out. MTB shoes for sure as you can walk normally in them. Love'em.
    None.

  17. #17
    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    Preferences for this sort of thing is intensely personal. I like 661 launches for shoes. the cleat is well-recessed, and they don't look too ridiculous. just kind of oafish. they're very walkable, and my main commuting spd-compat shoe. I tend to wear them the whole shift at work, despite crunching noises on concrete.

    As for pedals on-tour, consider something like the shimano pdm-324. Yes, they're ugly and heavy and freddly, but they have a platform(no clip) side and a spd side. On topur, you may find yourself in a wide range of conditions. If you're to be hiking a bit, you might not want to wear spd-ompat shoes. Or you may wish to bring a second set of shoes (if you're not very worried about weight) so you can let the main pair "breath" a bit, for odor control. the one-sided spd of the 324's will allow you to comfortably tool around in sneaks or boots or flip-flops or whatever you prefer.

    Of course, this concept won't appeal to many people, but it is versatile, and reasonably affordable..

    the pedals (about $80)
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...9&category=389

    also, fwiw. shimano cleats come in either 0degree or 4degrees of float. I forget which cleats came stock with the 324's, but I have 4degree cleats on 'em now.

    the shoes (also about $80):
    http://www.evanscycles.com/product_i...spd-shoes-.jpg


    hth,
    -rob

  18. #18
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    For shoes, pay whatever it takes to get a good fit, with space in front of the toes and no wiggle at the heels. You wont notice much difference if you save money by buying inexpensive pedals

  19. #19
    zen. Hofweber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewP View Post
    For shoes, pay whatever it takes to get a good fit, with space in front of the toes and no wiggle at the heels. You wont notice much difference if you save money by buying inexpensive pedals
    I agree wholeheartedly. I use sidi dominators (I scored them slightly used for 45 bucks on craigslist) and shimano SPD mountain pedals with a plastic platform on the other side. I wish I had bought the 324's, and might soon shell out for the much cheaper nashbar version.
    http://nashbar.com/profile.cfm?categ...eid=&pagename=

  20. #20
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
    IMO... Anything on the Rivendell sight should be taken with a grain of salt.
    About this size


    Stuart Black
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    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptyson23 View Post
    Cool guys, a lot of info there and a lot to take in. Going to the bike shop today so I'll have a word with the guys there. Seems like SPD's are favoured, whatever they are,lol. and then just chose a shoe that is comfortable, and I suppose that is where shopping online for cheaper shoes aint an option. I was in the bike shop last week and the guy recommended the pedals with clips on one side and just the pedal on the other so you could use both bike shoes and normal.
    Shimano Pedaling Dynamics. Look at double sided mountain bike pedals. Shimano M520 are about the best out there for pretty cheap. Go cheap on pedals but go expensive on shoes.
    Stuart Black
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  22. #22
    dia por dia El Pelon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foamy View Post
    SpeedPlay Frogs. Unlimited float. Double sided. Step on it and you're in—twist your ankle outboard and you're out. MTB shoes for sure as you can walk normally in them. Love'em.

    Not quite. I think it's 25 degrees each way. Also, they are single sided entry. In the out position, your foot is actually not cleated to the pedal, which can make accidental releases more common. Still, very good (although expensive) pedals.
    Dia por dia.

  23. #23
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    About this size:

  24. #24
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surreal View Post
    As for pedals on-tour, consider something like the shimano pdm-324. Yes, they're ugly and heavy and freddly, but they have a platform(no clip) side and a spd side.
    The pd-m324 is clipless on one side and a quill pedal on the other side. They are not platform pedals, though they accept clips.

    That pedal never made sense to me. Why would you have clipless on one side and clips on the other? When riding clipless, your clips would constantly be hitting the ground. Of course, you could just not install the clips or take them off every time your rode clipless. But then you would be riding on a quill pedal with no clips, I don't find that very comfortable for anything but a very short trip.

    Shimano has come out with a new pedal, the a530. This pedal is clipless on one side and a plain pedal on the other. I think this is a much better choice since the plain pedal has a lot of surface area for your foot to rest, spreading the pressure over a wider area.

  25. #25
    Ha ha HA! Me likey bikey! Foofy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptyson23 View Post
    Cool guys, a lot of info there and a lot to take in. Going to the bike shop today so I'll have a word with the guys there. Seems like SPD's are favoured, whatever they are,lol. and then just chose a shoe that is comfortable, and I suppose that is where shopping online for cheaper shoes aint an option. I was in the bike shop last week and the guy recommended the pedals with clips on one side and just the pedal on the other so you could use both bike shoes and normal
    I got a pair of those installed on my bike. Good pedals, but honestly I wish I saved the $189 and just stuck with my plain double-sided pedals. I never wear the cycling shoes anymore, just my normal shoes, sandals, and boots.

    I'm not really sure what your goals with bicycle touring (which is a fairly broad category of cycling) are, but if you're not looking to race or place emphasis on the athletic aspect of cycling, clipless pedals are really unnecessary. Even if you are into the athletic aspect of cycling, clipless still aren't necessary.

    But if you're set on giving them a try, go for it. They can be fun, and it's pretty cool having the option of pulling up on the pedals when climbing and sprinting.

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