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Old 01-12-02, 01:43 AM   #1
Dwagenheim
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Ortliebs and any thoughts on Trailers vs. Paniers?

I was thinking about purchasing some ortlieb paniers too. Some of the bike-packer lites (not the plastic roll down ones). I am surprised at all the waterproof bashing going on. Are these paniers that claim to be water resistant really not worth it?

I am currently riding on a Cdale f400 and am wondering if it will even be possible to attach a front rack on it for some low riding front paniers. I think this might be the decider between paniers or a trailer.

What are some of you guys' thoughts/pros n cons of using a BOB or going with the full out panier job?

Thanks,
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Old 01-12-02, 04:03 AM   #2
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Originally posted by Dwagenheim
I was thinking about purchasing some ortlieb paniers too. Some of the bike-packer lites (not the plastic roll down ones). I am surprised at all the waterproof bashing going on. Are these paniers that claim to be water resistant really not worth it?
"Waterproof" panniers are generally designed for riding only in light showers. If that is all you intend to do, they should serve that purpose. However, I have ridden in tropical downpours (as much as 150mm of rain in six hours), in which case, forget about it. "Waterproof" panniers just won't work in those conditions.

That doesn't mean you can't keep your stuff dry. If you can keep it snugly wrapped in reasonably sturdy plastic bags, you should be OK. You'll also have to use plastic bags on a long tour anyway to separate the wet stuff from the dry. When choosing panniers, look at weight and durability rather than "waterproofness".

As far as you other question goes, I have never used a trailer.
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Old 01-12-02, 05:46 AM   #3
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Qestion Toolfreak on his return to the forums soon, as he purchased a bike trailer for a just completed winter tour of Scotland , my information is that he was really pleased with its performance . and he was lugging along a fair old weight (about 35 kilo`s) mountineering equipment as well as all the usual camping gear

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Old 01-12-02, 07:44 AM   #4
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Dwagenheim. for your projected ride from Alaska to So.America, I would think a BOB trailer would be a good investment. You will need to be more self sufficient with tools, parts, WATER, food in the less populated areas. You could probably do it with just panniers, but I think the trailer would be much more convenient.

I would also suggest checking the archives here for book recommendations to get further hints and ideas. These would be in addition to the advise and ideas you'll receive from the Forums Folk.
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Old 01-12-02, 11:21 AM   #5
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Dwagenheim. for your projected ride from Alaska to So.America, I would think a BOB trailer would be a good investment. You will need to be more self sufficient with tools, parts, WATER, food in the less populated areas. You could probably do it with just panniers, but I think the trailer would be much more convenient.

I would also suggest checking the archives here for book recommendations to get further hints and ideas. These would be in addition to the advise and ideas you'll receive from the Forums Folk.
ljbike,
I had the same thoughts on considering the trailer. Plus I am 225lbs and I dunno if I want to be putting all that weight on the back tire with depending on soley paniers. But I dunno if that makes much of a difference. Right now I'm testing out some rear paniers I got from a friend. I've gone on some long rides so far, but haven't strapped my tent, extra clothes, and cooking gear on for some overnight touring just yet.
I guess this will be just one of those things I figure out a little later in training.

I can't help but remember what the guy who had been on the road touring for like 9 years said about paniers. He liked the feeling of everything being on the bike, kinda 'as one'.


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Old 01-12-02, 11:49 AM   #6
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I've done all my tours with panniers only, but have never undertaken a tour as ambitious as yours.

My son and I are hoping to do a cross Canada tour this year from Nova Scotia to Vancouver BC. I think a trailer will be a necessity for this one. We'll be using panniers as well.

Continental makes some good touring tires which should be able to handle your weight OK.

If my memory is correct, there were some threads here about trailers last summer. Might be worth lookin for.
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Old 01-12-02, 12:42 PM   #7
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Ortleib rolltop panniers are made just like their canoe bags, and are waterproof. Many cordura based ones leak like sieves.
My own Carradice cotton bags are water resistant, but I always use poly bags.
The problems of waterproof bags, as RoughStuff (a global tourist) notes, is the mildew effect in warm wet climates.

If you are a heavyweight tourist with panniers, it may be worth investing in 40 spoke handbuilt rear wheels.

How do Bobs handle on rough trails. I would imagine that some of your riding will be on poor roads.
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Old 01-12-02, 01:14 PM   #8
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Hi Dwagenheim,
i`m just back from my tour through Scotland and i`ll try to describe my experiences with the trailer (BoB yak)
My first thing to say is that i loaded to heavy, like Willic said about 35 kg.
This is TO MUCH , i`ve had some climbing gear with me as well my usual camping gear.

Dispite my heavy load, the trailer did real good, it follows the bike`s course very well, even in steep tarmac downhills!
I did some offroad as well, and again pretty impressive performance, the handling is very good.

There are two things i noticed during my trip, there was some space in the wheelbearings and the special replacement axle was bent on the two ends, but i think these things are the consequence of my heavy load.

I liked the big yellow waterproof bag, with not to much gear its easy to acces and to close, and another good point its very visible.
Like you said, it can spare your rear wheel as well, because of minor pressure on the axle

If you have any questions , just ask!

regards,
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Old 01-12-02, 04:04 PM   #9
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There are several concerns which have kept me from using a trailer. All trailers cause extra tension on whatever they are mounted to. If it is mounted to a chainstay, what is the extra tension doing to the BB welds?
All that aside, the bottom line is that trailers add weight. The best trailers may only add 10 lbs, but panniers weigh much less.
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Old 01-12-02, 10:17 PM   #10
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Dwagenheim,

My advice to you is to go and do an overnighter with either panniers or a trailer (maybe you can borrow one?) and see if you find it comfortable. People seem to have different opinions and experiences in this area, so perhaps you should determine what suits you best.

Ultimately I'd be having a shortened version just before attempting a tour of that scale anyway. Touring is a wonderful thing, but there are some who find the experience doesn't always suit them.
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Old 01-13-02, 03:35 AM   #11
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Originally posted by Chris L
Dwagenheim,

Touring is a wonderful thing, but there are some who find the experience doesn't always suit them.
I agree, that ultimately I need to make the comparison myself. That is always the best way to find out what suits us. I have yet to fully load up the paniers for some overnight touring. And I think I will. Right now, borrowing a trailer to use is pretty out of the question. I don't know too many cyclists who might be carrying a BOB. If there are, they're probably using it! Thats why I am open to hearing about the experiences of others on this one.

As someone pointed out, with the length and time invested of what I plan to do, I'll have to allow for some conveniences. Those might make the difference between a good and bad experience overall. So I might just do rear paniers and a trailer. Just not over pack either too much, which will still probably be an urge, especially starting out.

Thanks for your input. Feel free to share some of your touring experiences.

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Old 01-13-02, 09:44 PM   #12
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I prefer using both the BOB and panniers - the heavy stuff and gear thats not needed for the day's miles are loaded on the Yak, while foul weather gear, the day's food and snacks and generally the stuff I need to get to quickly rides in the panniers...best of both worlds.........
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Old 01-13-02, 10:35 PM   #13
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I prefer using both the BOB and panniers - the heavy stuff and gear thats not needed for the day's miles are loaded on the Yak, while foul weather gear, the day's food and snacks and generally the stuff I need to get to quickly rides in the panniers...best of both worlds.........
Very convincing...I am leaning heavy towards that option.

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Old 02-06-02, 06:56 PM   #14
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Their is a company called Old Man Mountain that makes pannier racks specifically for mountain bikes that have front or rear suspension or that don't have rack eyelets. They are sold in Adventure cycling and also from their own Web site. oldmanmountain .com The racks mount to the axle and the brake bolts.
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Old 02-07-02, 04:04 AM   #15
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Tubus make suspension racks.
Also see Load Llama.
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Old 07-20-09, 09:43 PM   #16
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I have done 2000k using both. I have cordura paniers but I stow my stuff in two garbage bags inside the paniers so who cares if the paniers leak. Ortleibs ar very expensive compared to a few garbage bags. I have a TW Bents trailer (marketed as a "Bob style") and it costs only $250au as opposed to $650 for a yak and $850 for an Ibex. TW Bents is a Taiwanese cycle manufacturer. (Google)
I carry my tent, ground sheet, mattress, rope and sleeping gear in one pannier and all my clothes in stuff sacks and waterproof garbage bags in the other. In the trailer I carry spares, tools, fishing tackle, food, water, and my kitchen. I have a seat-back bag that has valuables, medication, journal and electronic equipment. This also has a waterproof inner. I have a very comfortable camp and the ability to go a few days between stores.
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Old 07-20-09, 09:54 PM   #17
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Panniers vs trailer

I have four Ortleib panniers that I like and use sometimes. I also have a BOB trailer and I like and use it sometimes. I do not prefer one over the other. Both are a great way to travel and it depends on my mood if I use panniers or a trailer. Both have good and bad points in my opinion.
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Old 07-20-09, 10:22 PM   #18
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Lazarus thread.
Serious lazarus thread.

I guess search is working.
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Old 07-21-09, 01:10 AM   #19
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Start a new thread. Reply to and old thread. What's the difference? On any bicycle forum, there are always going to be certain topics that come up time and again.
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Old 07-21-09, 07:23 PM   #20
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Ortlieb's are great, and the back and front roller classics well made, good connection system, and are waterproof! We use our Ortlieb rack packs as "dry bags" in our canoe.
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Old 07-24-09, 03:09 PM   #21
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Hey Dwagenheim, I'm actually on a break in Eugene right now, lol.

Anyways I recommend you get the trailer, I've met several tourists now who pulla BOB trailer and they all said they love them. One French guy told me he uses his off road all the time and it handles well. You and I weigh almost the same but I have been doing the 4 pannier thing and destroyed one rim already supposedly after running over a curb straight on (less than 5 MPH). If you think about it, that's really not much of a shock and I was running a 40 hole rear wheel on Velocity Dyad rims with 2mm straight guage spokes and a 4 cross build (built by a 260lb tourer) so if I can blow that wheel up on the streets you'll definitely be able to do it on the rough roads and trails of South America.

As far as the waterproofness of the Ortliebs they have been great so far. Rode through numerous flash floods in France and several all day sprinkles though no 6 hour tropical storms like someone else on here. My front panniers are just cheap MEC jobs and they kept my stuff mostly dry too though. I think it's wise to get a set of Ortliebs and a set of water permeable panniers too if you were to go the pannier/rack route but I don't recommend it. The only downside I've heard about BOB trailers is that they can fishtail on you above 25 mph but I gather that can be overcome with good loading and how offten do you go that fast on a touring bike anyways?
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Old 07-24-09, 05:33 PM   #22
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Quality racks with quality panniers = first choice.
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Old 07-25-09, 10:02 AM   #23
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I've toured with 4 panniers and I've toured with Bob. I've come to prefer panniers, though the Bob is okay too. The panniers just feel a little lighter going over mountain passes.
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