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Old 01-09-09, 06:21 PM   #1
kbpfister
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linear Pull, cantilever, caliper?

So, why is it that touring bikes seem to favor Linear pull or cantilever brakes over side or center pull caliper brakes?
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Old 01-09-09, 06:34 PM   #2
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So, why is it that touring bikes seem to favor Linear pull or cantilever brakes over side or center pull caliper brakes?
+ Which one do you prefer for touring?
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Old 01-09-09, 06:48 PM   #3
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Well all my bikes have caliper brakes on them, but I'm a noob, I've never ridden a bike with cantilevers
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Old 01-09-09, 06:59 PM   #4
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Any of them will work fine. Canti and linear pull allow a wider tire. All 3 have to good features and some drawbacks.

There's no reason for you to ever really need anything but sidepulls on your touring bike, if that's what you want.
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Old 01-09-09, 10:00 PM   #5
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All my bikes have calipers.... of the disc flavor
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Old 01-09-09, 11:12 PM   #6
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Also clearance for fenders, if you want fenders.
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Old 01-10-09, 02:22 AM   #7
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Ah I see, it's just a tire and fender clearance issue, I just didn't understand why one would be more commonly found on a touring bike than a road bike, thanks
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Old 01-10-09, 06:10 AM   #8
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Some would argue that v-brake and properly adjusted cantis just have more muscle for pulling up a fully loaded tourer than centre pull/sidepull/dual pivot calipers.
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Old 01-10-09, 07:10 AM   #9
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It's my understanding that canti brakes potentially have more stopping power. If not, why do so many tandems have them? However, clearance for larger tires and fenders is probably the biggest issue.
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Old 01-10-09, 10:22 AM   #10
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It's horses for courses. Canti and V brakes deliver more of sheer stopping power and so tend to be used on touring bikes which tend to be loaded with luggage and camping gear.
Sidepulls on the other hand are the choice of roadmen where stopping power is less important but the ability to modulate the braking is all-important in that group riding demand this.
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Old 01-10-09, 01:18 PM   #11
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In my opinion, after working around all kinds of brakes-- cantis have the least real stopping power. Darn things squeal a lot too. After V brakes got going, all the MTBs switched in 1 year. Cantilevers couldn't have been all that great. Cantis work with STI levers and they have a lot of retro appeal and they work well enough, but there's nothing wrong with the other kind of brakes.

There's always a lot of tech talk on this forum, and mostly it's good. There are a lot really smart people here. But bikes are bikes-- not NASA spaceships. Most gear choices are of a personal nature in cyclo-touring. *Run what you got* is my motto.
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Old 01-10-09, 02:22 PM   #12
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In my opinion, after working around all kinds of brakes-- cantis have the least real stopping power. Darn things squeal a lot too.
Then you must have only worked with poor quality cantis or did not set them up correctly. Cantilevers are very powerful when set up correctly. But, they can be a pain to set up correctly.
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Old 01-10-09, 02:41 PM   #13
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Don't forget hydraulic rim brakes!
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Old 01-10-09, 06:05 PM   #14
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In my opinion, after working around all kinds of brakes-- cantis have the least real stopping power. Darn things squeal a lot too. After V brakes got going, all the MTBs switched in 1 year. Cantilevers couldn't have been all that great. Cantis work with STI levers and they have a lot of retro appeal and they work well enough, but there's nothing wrong with the other kind of brakes.

There's always a lot of tech talk on this forum, and mostly it's good. There are a lot really smart people here. But bikes are bikes-- not NASA spaceships. Most gear choices are of a personal nature in cyclo-touring. *Run what you got* is my motto.

This is the answer.
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