Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 38
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    My Bikes
    Broken Fuji Sundance 80's, Jamis Coda E, Surly LHT
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Vancouver to Calgary via Squamish/Jasper

    Greetings. After much reading about the beauty I'm about to encounter this late June, I'm understanding that North is not the popular way to exit Vancouver. Is it much more scenic to head East out of Vancouver? I know its a bit shorter. Shorter just = less fun. So, I'm puzzled by the lack of discussion & info about routes up the Sea-to-Sky highway and across the yonder-land to Jasper. How can you pass up a name like Sea-to-Sky Highway? As well, I'm looking very forward, to being fondled by the famous granite domes of Squamish area. Haha - sorry - Just love the big rocks!

    Oh, by the look of the Bicycle routes in Vancouver, the bikes routes cross the bridges via the sidewalks? Is that what the maps are portraying with the segmented/dotted lines? Thanks to You.

  2. #2
    member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    My Bikes
    Cannondale T1000
    Posts
    133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I haven't cycled yet in B.C., but I've read that the Sea to Sky Hwy. is narrow and very busy to Whistler; although it's currently being widened, probably for the winter Olympics next year. North of Whistler though, it becomes quieter, so I've also read. See Crazyguy for more info. There's a guy on that site that explains it all very well (Randobarf? on BF). The best way out of Vancouver is Hwy. 7 (on the N. side of the Fraser river). It may be a longer route but it seems most cyclists go that way.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    SW Washington, USA
    Posts
    373
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Check out this website. The guy has ridden all over BC and has done us a service by mapping it all. It'd take a lifetime of summers to do all that.

    -- Mark

  4. #4
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are looking for scenic, you'll get it on the 99.The Section out of Vancouver is busy, but manageable.

    You will also get what might be the hardest climb you've ever done, on the Duffy Lake Road, over to Lillooet. I did this for the first time in 1982 ... on an ordinary touring bike (Nishiki Landau) ... before it was paved. Memorable.

    Depending on the bike you're riding, if you want more adventure, take the (dirt) road out of Pavillion, over the plateau to Clinton. More BIG climbs and switchbacks. From Clinton, continue north on 97 to 97 Mile. Hang a left to Little Fort. Then take the Yellowhead (5) to the Junction w/ 16 and hang a left to Jasper. Don't forget to do the BJ (Banff-Jasper).

    You're in for the trip of a lifetime.

    Straight E. out of Van is miles of city and burbs and horrible traffic, unless you have local knowledge.
    Last edited by Randochap; 01-24-09 at 12:33 PM.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  5. #5
    Barfin' Round the World
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Access to the Sea to Sky Highway from Vancouver is easy. Just take the Stanley Park perimeter road then the Upper Levels Highway (99) or Marine Drive (more scenic). The bike lane across the Lion's Gate bridge is the sidewalk. It's fine for riding on.

    Whether you go east or north from Vancouver there is lots of scenery.

    As EmmCeeBee pointed out, Neil Roughley's cycling page is a wealth of information. The thing to be aware of is that there is a very steep switchback climb leaving Pemberton for Lillooet. If it's hot you will have to load yourself down with water. Lillooet can be very hot in summer. I don't have a very high opinion of the Sea to Sky Highway as a host for cyclists (and I have done it many times) but other people have enjoyed it:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page/?page_id=64858

  6. #6
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Of course, everything randobarf says is true. But keep in mind his invective springs from the heart of a local witnessing what is in his view the desecration of this spectacular piece of the planet by money-grubbing fascists.

    I share his horror and I'm glad that I have the memory of Sea to Sky before the fascists moved in and wax nostalgic about the Whistler of yore, when young ski bums could squat in hand-built shacks and ski all day and **** all night. They still do that now (at least the well-heeled do), but in million dollar condos.

    Put in perspective though -- because all the beautiful places of the world are under pressure from the same greedy swine -- Hwy 99 is still spectacular and most people you meet -- even in Whistler -- are great.

    From Pemberton on, you're in the boonies and the scenery just gets more breathtaking. I'll take it over the strip malls and tract housing of Abbotsford any day.

    +1 for heat in summer. But this guy's from Texas.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  7. #7
    Barfin' Round the World
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ha, ha! That is a good point that Randochap makes about the 50 miles of spectacular urban sprawl one must negotiate leaving Vancouver eastbound. Going north to the Sea to Sky avoids that mess.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    My Bikes
    Broken Fuji Sundance 80's, Jamis Coda E, Surly LHT
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Encouraging words

    Thanks - You guys are terrific. I'll take your comments regarding the route as encouragement & I agree, as a group we behave much like weeds - BTW- I give a small yearly contribution to a not for profit org. that tries to rein in the urban sprawl. Maybe I need to increase my small donation.?
    As for the route- EmmCeeBee thanks for the tip on the map.
    Randobarf -I'm so glad to hear I don't have to compete with the cars on the bridges.
    Randochap - Yes, I live in far north Texas. My touring scenery and biking traffic is very different than the Vancouver area. look below for a view of life on the brown disc....ain't no one gonna' sneak up on me, eh? I can see for miles in every direction. Thanks again!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Hooked on Touring
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Of course - - it's even more scenic heading out of Prince Rupert along the primeval Skeena River.
    And even more, of that's possible out of Bella Coola.
    (But the climb out of Bella Coola over Heckman Pass is sheer murder.)

    If you want to skip Vancouver altogether - you can opt to take the ferry/bus combo to Port Hardy, then take the day ferry through the Inside Passage to either Prince Rupert or Bella Coola - bearing in mind that they operate every other day.

    I've been on almost every paved road in BC - from the Haines Highway segment in the far north to the Crowsnest Hwy in the south. Also been on a lot of forest roads including the North Flathead border crossing that is now closed. Still, I have always managed to avoid Vancouver by bike. My most famous Houdini scheme was to take the BC Ferries from Nanaimo to Tsawwassen and then back to Swartz Bay as a way of zigging past the city.

    Just FYI - it's about 500 miles from Vancouver to Jasper, 600 miles Bella Coola to Jasper, and 700 miles Prince Rupert to Jasper. The Bella Coola route from the coast to Williams Lake is extremely remote, but stunning - with short unpaved stretches. The Prince Rupert route is moderately remote - with longer stretches between Prince Rupert and Terrace and between Purden Lake and McBride that are without services.

    Whichever route you take, don't miss Mount Robson which is about a day west of Jasper. You can bike into the first backcountry campsite - just a fabulous park. If you are interested in either of these alternatives, I'd be glad to share info.

    J

    PS - Kinney Lake in Mount Robson Park


  10. #10
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jamawani View Post
    Of course - - it's even more scenic heading out of Prince Rupert along the primeval Skeena River.
    And even more, of that's possible out of Bella Coola. (But the climb out of Bella Coola over Heckman Pass is sheer murder.)

    If you want to skip Vancouver altogether - you can opt to take the ferry/bus combo to Port Hardy, then take the day ferry through the Inside Passage to either Prince Rupert or Bella Coola
    I'd say it's splitting hairs to say "even more scenic," but, at the risk of confusing the OP further, yes, the Inside Passage would be another great and scenic adventure. You must admit, however, that after the junction with 37 (one of the greatest cycling adventure roads in the world) and the Seven Sisters there isn't much to distinguish Hwy 16, until you near the Rockies.

    And I'm rather fond of Vancouver Island ... as a long-time resident. But why take the bus? The ride up Island to Port Hardy is awesome, especially if you take time to explore the back roads and maybe take in a Gulf Island or two on the way!
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  11. #11
    Hooked on Touring
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,120
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Randochap View Post
    And I'm rather fond of Vancouver Island ... as a long-time resident. But why take the bus? The ride up Island to Port Hardy is awesome, especially if you take time to explore the back roads and maybe take in a Gulf Island or two on the way!
    I've biked the island three times - never taken the bus.
    I agree it's great - especially north of Campbell River - but I was thinking time issues.

    And as for Hwy 16 - it's pretty stunning at Old Hazelton and the K'san village at the forks of the Bulkley and Skeena. Smithers and Telkwa are lovely, too. It's just that the Lower Skeena is almost untouched while the Lower Fraser is so developed. As for the plateau, it is a bit ordinary - but with conveniently spaced towns.

    The Bella Coola road - Hwy 20 - is truly amazing - and not for the fainthearted with Heckman Pass to climb. But you can connect back up with the Thompson Hwy - Hwy 5 - near Clearwater, so it's not that much longer than the Vancouver route (if you take the bus to Port Hardy).

    I have nothing against Vancouver - it's one of the most beautiful cities in North America. I just don't like bike touring in large metro areas if I can avoid it.

    PS - I really wish they had a ferry from the end of Hwy 101 to Cortes Island so you could make a crossing over to Campbell River. Do you know if that is in the works after the Depression of 2009?

  12. #12
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jamawani View Post
    And as for Hwy 16 - it's pretty stunning at Old Hazelton and the K'san village at the forks of the Bulkley and Skeena. Smithers and Telkwa are lovely, too. It's just that the Lower Skeena is almost untouched while the Lower Fraser is so developed. As for the plateau, it is a bit ordinary - but with conveniently spaced towns.

    I have nothing against Vancouver - it's one of the most beautiful cities in North America. I just don't like bike touring in large metro areas if I can avoid it.

    PS - I really wish they had a ferry from the end of Hwy 101 to Cortes Island so you could make a crossing over to Campbell River. Do you know if that is in the works after the Depression of 2009?
    Not likely. Sunshine Coast Ferries here. All the hwy money in the province appears to be going to 99, for the Olympics.

    I try to avoid Vancouver myself, except for the occasional trip I have to make to attend BC Randonneurs meetings. I do most of my brevets here, or do those that start out in the valley.

    Yes, K'san, the Hazeltons, etc. are great. Especially recommend Higway 37 -- branching north at Kitwanga. I hear its mostly paved now, since I did it last. Also would like to go back and do the tour up through Anhluut'ukwsim Laxmihl Angwinga'asanskwhl (Nisga'a Provincial Park). Many visitors (and, shamefully, residents of this incredible place) don't take time to explore the native culture and miss what is as rich and "exotic" as any cultural experience on the planet.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  13. #13
    Barfin' Round the World
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    37 from Kitwanga to Meziadin Lake and 37A from Meziadin Lake to the twin metropolises of Stewart BC and Hyder Alaska are both nicely paved. That's a nice little trip (especially during the spring and fall breakup when there are no logging trucks) as opposed to going further north on 37 to the Alaska Highway. When in Hyder one can partake of white culture which consists of getting Hyderized on Everclear at the Glacier Inn and receiving a certificate for doing so. The particular type of Everclear served at the Glacier Inn is illegal in most jurisdictions because it is 95% alcohol (190 proof) and not really a refreshing beverage.

    On the other hand the aboriginal culture of the area is absolutely fascinating as Randochap says and worth reading about before starting your trip. It is not a trip to a museum. It is a trip to the midst of living cultures that have survived for thousands of years.


    The Frankmackie glacier about 70 km north of Hyder. This is a very large glacier. I took the photo about 7000 feet above the surface of the glacier. The mountains on the horizon are about 20 miles away.
    Last edited by Randobarf; 01-25-09 at 01:19 PM.

  14. #14
    Cycled on all continents JohnyW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Germany
    My Bikes
    see homepage (currently only in German)
    Posts
    398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by Randochap View Post
    You will also get what might be the hardest climb you've ever done, on the Duffy Lake Road, over to Lillooet.
    I cycled the Duffy Lake 2007 and had 43C and 40 kg of luggage. I always read that with climb is challenging. But from my point of view it's a normal mountain climb. The first 5 km are lightly steep (13%) after that the last 9 km were easy to cycle. The most challenging think were the mosquitos...

    Don't you have any real climb in North America? I cycle on my tours several (>50) climbs that were harder.

    Regarding the Sea-to-Sky Highway + Duffy Lake Road. The landscape is nice the 2nd best I cycled in Kanada after the Icefield PW. For a Tour I recommend it (I never had any problems with traffic on that road).

    I'd go roughly Vancouver - whistler - Kamloops - Revelstroke - Lake Luise - Jasper

    Thomas
    My Travelogues: http://thomasontour.de (currently only in German)

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    My Bikes
    Broken Fuji Sundance 80's, Jamis Coda E, Surly LHT
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The picture of Mt Robson is stunning. I must take a day off in that area. Good tip. Mr. Roughly's route guides are a treasure of information. The B.C. travel and tourism bureau should give him an award for his efforts -IMO.

    Regarding the climbing, steepness - I've been working to lighten my load, i.e. lighter cookware, tent, as well as hauling fewer Power Bars & less scotch. Those are preparations I can control -kinda'. I admit it's a little daunting to "train" for a tour in the mountains while living on primarily flat terrain. But I find its "mostly" mental. I do have the advantage of a canyon just 30 miles south of home that sports a 1.5 km climb at 10%. What I find to be a greater aid to getting in shape is the incessant wind. We all know the only difference between a 32kph headwind and a 10% climb is the view at the end. As helpful as it may be - Wind never = inspiration to ride!

    At this time - I wish I could find some info about "public" lands in Canada, if it exists, what are the attitudes, and acceptable uses. I'm no cheaper than the next guy, (and the $25.00 campsite definitely has its place on tour), however, I find the "amenities" I pay for go mostly unrealized. Not to mention - I seem to attract only the most obnoxious sort of campers. Sometimes I just need the solitude a stealth camp offers. Any advice?? Hope my jabbering has not bored.

  16. #16
    Barfin' Round the World
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    101
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Re: Stealth Camping

    There's lots of wilderness Crown land between Jasper and Vancouver. It is in effect owned by the Queen of England so if she is cycletouring she could take your spot but I have never seen her on a bike in British Columbia. The private property is pretty obvious and the rules for private property are the same as the USA.

    One thing to consider when you are in bear country is that being in a campground with other human snacks increases the probability that the other campers will be mauled and you will be left untouched, ready to cycle another day. Having once had my tent and sleeping bag shredded by a bear that had been fed by humans I find I do not always sleep well at stealth campsites.

    The government campgrounds are usually not too bad and there is a chance you can get a warm shower without having to bathe in a glacier fed (ie bloody freezing) stream at a stealth camp.

    I put some confidential crazynotes on National Park Fees on one of my Crazyguyonabike pages:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page/?page_id=64857

  17. #17
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
    Hi,

    Don't you have any real climb in North America? I cycle on my tours several (>50) climbs that were harder.
    Nope. Just little ones for us weenies. Better give us a pass and stay with countries built for real men.

    I'd go roughly Vancouver - whistler - Kamloops - Revelstroke - Lake Luise - Jasper

    Thomas
    Not a good route. Despite some good scenery, the Trans-Canada (that's Canada) has worse traffic than Sea to Sky. Use the route I layed out above.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  18. #18
    aspiring island dweller spinninwheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    denman
    My Bikes
    Cannondale T-2000/Rohloff Custom, Cannondale R-700, Custom Fixie/Single Speed
    Posts
    267
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Randochap View Post
    Nope. Just little ones for us weenies. Better give us a pass and stay with countries built for real men. .
    Life is either a wild adventure or nothing - Helen Keller

  19. #19
    Senior Member tourbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Vancouver\Whistler, BC
    Posts
    86
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi from Whistler,
    The Sea to Sky highway has beautiful scenery as are the rocks faces in Squamish. The Duffy Lake road has some spectacular scenery. My favorite place is Whistler but, I'm somewhat biased because I spend a lot of weekends here in the winter and summer.

    The Sea to Sky highway is still under construction and will be until next fall. It's gradually getting better and safer and will include a good shoulder. But, until it's finished, I wouldn't be keen to ride it. There may also be road closures to be aware of: www.drivebc.com. When the highway is complete, I suspect Vancouver-Whistler will become a popular route for cyclists, as Banff-Jasper is. Perhaps you can wait a year.

    Whistler: There's a provincial campground north of Whistler at Nairn Falls. Or, spend the bucks and stay at the Whistler private campground that's close to the village but, be warned, it's pricey and wouldn't likely appeal to someone who likes to pitch a tent anywhere.

    You'll also find various forest service campgrounds along the route that are free and rustic. I prefer our provincial campgrounds because they're usually clean, well-managed (they keep control of rowdy partiers), safe, large sites, some have showers, there's often other cyclists, and the bears have a choice of snacks.

    The Duffy Lake Rd has virtually no services so plan ahead and take lots of water...you'll need it for the hill climbs and it can get very hot.

    Vancouver bridges: Heading out of the Vancouver airport is the Art Lang bridge that cyclists ride on the shoulder (no sidewalks) then there's bike routes through the neighbourhoods (avoid Granville St) to downtown then to Stanley Park and then the sidewalk over the Lions Gate bridge and up to the Upper Levels highway to highway 99. Vancouver is a beautiful city and great for cycling - my commute to work is 35km and includes trails, highways, 3 bridges, and bike routes. City bike maps are available and I highly recommend getting one.

    The alternative of heading east from Vancouver... there are some nice routes along country roads and farm land. This is where local knowledge, bike books, or local clubs can help. But, I find while there are lots of nice day rides east of Vancouver, the route from Vancouver to Hope is rather boring in comparison to the Sea to Sky...but, like I said before, I'm kinda biased.

    Cheers.
    '07 Marinoni Turismo Touring, '83 Trek 620 Touring, Trek 1500wsd road bike
    Trek Fuel EX7 MTB, Fuji MTB, Need a bigger garage!

  20. #20
    Cycled on all continents JohnyW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Germany
    My Bikes
    see homepage (currently only in German)
    Posts
    398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by Randochap View Post
    Not a good route. Despite some good scenery, the Trans-Canada (that's Canada) has worse traffic than Sea to Sky. Use the route I layed out above.
    I only cycled the Trans-Canada HW between Victoria - Nanaimo and Golden - Calgary. I didn't cycled the Kamloops - Revelstoke because I made a "mistake" to finish the tour in Calgary instead of Edmonton. So I cycled the Yellowhead from Kamloops to Tete Jaune. It's a nice route. But if I have to rate this route it will be at bottom of the list.

    Regarding the Duffy Lake Road. For instance the climb to the Mt. Maxwell on Salt Spring Island is harder.
    I just "complain" because you can read quite often that the Duffy Lake Road is extremely hard. For my point of view it's a normal mountain pass that you'll find a lot of in Alps here in Europe.

    Thomas
    My Travelogues: http://thomasontour.de (currently only in German)

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Panhandle of Texas
    My Bikes
    Broken Fuji Sundance 80's, Jamis Coda E, Surly LHT
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tourbiker - Thanks for the helpful info. I'll take your advice and make certain I have a plan B in case the road is closed or insanely unsafe. Maybe there is a shuttle that can take me past the questionable areas - whishful thinking perhaps. As an ex-climber I've always hoped to get the chance to see this world class area....it will take alot to turn me back.
    And...Thanks to all the guides and guide books that take the time to inform me - to make my travels safer and more rewarding. Be Well Always.

  22. #22
    cyclotourist
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    calgary, canada
    Posts
    560
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wow, some good ideas here. I'd love to cycle the Duffy Lake road or that route from Bella Coola. I would also agree to stay away from the Trans Canada Highway as much as possible.

    Crown lands don't belong to the Queen ,they are provincial lands. You used to be able to camp for free on Crown lands in BC, but I am not sure if that is still the case. I tried to do a google search but I didn't come up with anything definite. In any case if you are out of sight of the road, you will be okay.

    You do have to pay for BC forest service campsites (formerly free) and many have been decommissioned and returned to local management, which means they are just getting trashed, sad to say.

    In any case, you will need to use good bear safe camping practises, whether you are in a designated campsite or not. Designated campsites often attract bears as they know they can find food or garbage there.

    Have a great trip.

  23. #23
    Senior Member tourbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Vancouver\Whistler, BC
    Posts
    86
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There aren't any shuttles, just the train or Greyhound buses but, neither would be ideal with a bike. The local transit system has commuter buses running from Squamish to Whistler: http://www.bctransit.com/regions/whi...e.cfm?line=98& All Whistler buses have bike racks on the front so these likely do too (I suggest emailing them to confirm if you're considering the bus). But, taking the bus or train means missing out on cycling at least half the route, not just the bad highway sections. It's not uncommon to see cyclists on the highway in summer and I've never heard of any accidents involving bikes. With the Olympics coming in a year, I'm sure we'll see more cyclists than ever on the highway.

    I suggest checking out the Squamish Adventure Centre. As an x-climber, you may be interested in doing a climb with a tour group so you could rent the gear - this would be well worth it. Also, they may be able to tell you what the status of the highway will be in June. Closures during the day are often little more than an inconvenience (i.e. 20-30 minutes) because they try to do the closures at night. The bigger problem would be a lack of shoulders in the construction areas. By June, it's possible that these problems could be minimal. This will depend in part on this winter's weather and how much progress they can make. The highway is already sooooo much safer and better than it used to be with sharp corners now gone and wider shoulders where the highway is completed. Also, construction areas require traffic to slow to 30mph which means traffic will likely be doing about 35-45mph in these areas with no shoulders. Weekend traffic is busier with very little construction so the traffic goes even faster in these areas - I guess the idiots see it as a slalom course.

    Check out: www.tourismsquamish.com and
    www.adventurecentre.ca

    Re: the forest service campgrounds. Sadly, some have been closed and some have transferred to local management (many are in worse condition than when they were free). I think there are still some that are useable, whether free or not. Local tourist offices, like the Squamish Adventure Centre, may be able to help with advice.

    Have fun.
    '07 Marinoni Turismo Touring, '83 Trek 620 Touring, Trek 1500wsd road bike
    Trek Fuel EX7 MTB, Fuji MTB, Need a bigger garage!

  24. #24
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    On the Edge
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    2,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnyW View Post
    Hi,

    I cycled the Yellowhead from Kamloops to Tete Jaune. It's a nice route. But if I have to rate this route it will be at bottom of the list.
    Are you sure you were in the same"Canada" I live in?

    Regarding the Duffy Lake Road. For instance the climb to the Mt. Maxwell on Salt Spring Island is harder.


    Mt. Maxwell rises from sea level (let's use Ganges as a starting point, right on the ocean, though the climbing doesn't start there) to 588 metres (1929 ft) over about 4 kilometres. There are some steep sections and it's unpaved.

    By comparison, the Duffy Lake Road climbs gently from Pemberton Flats (204 m/670 ft) to 274 m (900ft) over 6.4 km (4mi) then rears up in a series of 15% switchbacks to Joffree Lakes at 1,249 metres (4,100 ft) in just 9.6km. (6 mi). Between Mt. Currie and Lillooet, you climb about 1,661 metres (5451 ft) over 96.7 Km.

    For my point of view it's a normal mountain pass that you'll find a lot of in Alps here in Europe.

    Thomas
    That's right, it's a mountain pass. Not the most difficult in the world, but worthy of it's reputation among weak and inexperienced Canadians. We aspire however, one day in the geological future, to grow some mountains worthy of real men.

    In the meantime, here on the flatlands of British Columbia, we must make do with what little lumps the Creator has bestowed and get on with our menial chores.
    Last edited by Randochap; 01-27-09 at 12:41 PM.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  25. #25
    Cycled on all continents JohnyW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Germany
    My Bikes
    see homepage (currently only in German)
    Posts
    398
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi,

    Quote Originally Posted by Randochap View Post
    Are you sure you were in the same"Canada" I live in?
    I think so.

    I cycled following parts
    - Vancouver via Salt Spring to Victoria.
    - Victoria to Nanaimo (incl. MacMullan, Qualicum, Englishman River)
    - Sea to Sky
    - Duffy Lake
    - Thomson Canyon to Kamploops
    - Yellowhead
    - Tete Jaune to Jasper
    - Icefield Parkway
    - Golden Triangle
    - Banff - Calgary

    So please rate the routes - I don't think that the Yellowhead would be rated on top. I hadn't had any uninteresting route in Canada...
    My Travelogues: http://thomasontour.de (currently only in German)

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •