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  1. #1
    to the end wheel.endure.it's Avatar
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    Agony! Should I turn my back or extend a hand?

    So I'm in the midst of building my first decent bike (read: beside the creatively pieced together second-hands that have plagued my cycling life). I have a wheelset (new! first ever!), brakes, bars, tires, derailers, racks, post and a saddle. Essentially, I need a frame, levers, pedals and a crankset.

    Today, as I was scrounging through my LBS's used parts garage (slipping back into old ways...) I spotted a beautiful pair of Sugino AT cranks bolted onto a motley frame. I grabbed the frame and started towards the wrenches, but stopped. The frame was light as a tissue, and had cantilever posts, and all the little braze-ons, and was my size, and was a Fuji, a soft spot of mine. It was in rough shape: the paint was a mess, there was a fair amount of rust, hopefully just surface, and the forks were missing. Regardless, it is a 1984 Fuji Touring Series IV.

    Obviously, I'm torn. I'm on my way up in life, towards that nice cozy home (frame), and new car (wheelset), and beautiful wife (bars!). Should I steal the shoes off the old drifter and throw her back in the gutter or nurse her back to life? Should I postpone/scrap my current build to do so? Will she be faithful if I did?

    Ian

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Put it in your attic. It'll keep.

  3. #3
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    Personally I'd jump at the chance to ride an old Fuji Touring Series IV (current bike is a mid-80s Miyata 610). There might be a problem fitting the brakes, because of the spacing of the canti studs. Spacing of the rear end may need adjustment, too, esp. for 135mm hubs. And some other adjustments may be needed to deal with the changing specs of bike components. All worth it to ride an honest, unpretentious, dedicated steel tourer built by a company that has cranked out an untold number of bikes.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
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    Aug 2006
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    Central Coast, CA
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    Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)
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    I'd buy it. Whatever I didn't use on the current project would go into the shop for a future project. I love projects. I get nervous when I don't have project bikes. The hard part is figuring out what to do with them when they're finished. I've run out of family members who ride!

  5. #5
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    you gotta get it.

    i wish any of my shops carried used stuff like that so i wouldn't have to scrounge off of ebay all the time.

  6. #6
    Senior Member tarwheel's Avatar
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    Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Gunnar Crosshairs, De Bernardi SL
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    Buy the frame and get it stripped and powder-coated. With a fresh paint job, it would be just like new.

  7. #7
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    Make sure your wheels will fit. Older bikes had 126 spacing for 5/6 speed. Modern bikes need 130 for road spacing, 135 for MTB hubs.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Gotte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjones View Post
    Make sure your wheels will fit. Older bikes had 126 spacing for 5/6 speed. Modern bikes need 130 for road spacing, 135 for MTB hubs.
    Mine, an old 60s Coventry Eagle, bends enough to fit the wheel. It's safe enough, just a little awkward.

    As for the Fuji. BUY IT. You know you want to.

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