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  1. #1
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    Rack and fender mounting question

    If you want both racks and fenders front and back, is it necessary to have double eyelets? If you have only single eyelets, what are the options for mounting both? thanks.
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  2. #2
    You gonna eat that? Doohickie's Avatar
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    You can double up. Just get a longer screw if you need it.
    I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



    Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."

  3. #3
    Bike Nerd Mr. Jim's Avatar
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    My front rack had extra eyelets for fenders.
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    Put the rack next to the frame, then the fender, then use a stainless steel M5 allen bolt with a washer.
    If you put the fender in forst, the rack will have more leverage on the bolt and may snap it.
    Make sure the bolt is long enough to protrude a few threads but not interfere with the chain. Carry some spare bolts. I replace short waterbottle bolts with one long enough for the rack, you can ride without a waterbottle in an emergency.

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    The struts on the rear fender can often be mounted directly to the rack with band clamps from the local hardware store. I mount the top fender fitting directly to my rack using two short bolts and a few old style flat faucet washers for spacers. I shortened the lower strut to 9 1/2 inches and that attaches to the rack with a band clamp. The result is a nice stiff fender that does not interfere with the rack mounts.

  6. #6
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chewybrian View Post
    If you want both racks and fenders front and back, is it necessary to have double eyelets? If you have only single eyelets, what are the options for mounting both? thanks.
    If you have Tubus racks, they have an integrated fender mount.




    Otherwise, MichaelW has it covered. Make sure you use a washer that is large enough to cover the fender wire or you'll pull the bolt head through the fender and end up with a loose bolt.
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    Ideally you want a chromed not stainless M5 bolt, the stainless ones tend not to be strong.

    The front rack, if a low rider, will normally share the same eyelet as the fender, so even if you have two, you end up doubling one the lower one. I make up a special fender stay that rather than having a loop has a small piece of plate. This is more reliable/less likely to spread, and is thinner so it doesn't require as much space.

    For the rear rack I use the two eyelets. But there are other options as mentioned. Since building my own racks I integrate the fender mounts to the racks.

  8. #8
    Recovering mentalist Randochap's Avatar
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    Stacking, or Tubus.
    VeloWeb | VeloWebLog

    "The bicycle is the noblest invention of mankind." ~William Saroyan

  9. #9
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the answers. I have my eye on THIS RACK. It seems to have enough places to mount with the double-up method, without even using the mount to the frame.

    I have a couple more touring dummy questions: How important is it to have cantilever brakes? They provide extra stopping power for full loads, right? If you wanted a touring frame that did not have the studs, would you take the rather extreme step of having them brazed on?

    Bonus question: what are recessed brakes vs. nutted brakes, and the benefits of either, and does the frame have to be made specifically for one or the other?
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  10. #10
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    Cantilever brakes dont really have more stopping power than quality dual pivot callipers but they do allow more tyre clearance.
    On my road bike I can just squeeze a 32mm inside my long drop DPs. If you want more clearance than that you need cantilevers (or V brakes)
    Recessed or not depends on the fork. If the fork has a recess (like a countersink) at the the rear of the brake bolt hole you either need a recessed brake or a widget to fill it in to use a nutted brake. You cant used recessed brakes on an unrecessed fork.
    Nutted brakes usually play nicer with fenders , dynamo lamps and other things that mount onto the brake bolt.

  11. #11
    Wookie Fred chewybrian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    Cantilever brakes dont really have more stopping power than quality dual pivot callipers but they do allow more tyre clearance.
    On my road bike I can just squeeze a 32mm inside my long drop DPs. If you want more clearance than that you need cantilevers (or V brakes)
    Recessed or not depends on the fork. If the fork has a recess (like a countersink) at the the rear of the brake bolt hole you either need a recessed brake or a widget to fill it in to use a nutted brake. You cant used recessed brakes on an unrecessed fork.
    Nutted brakes usually play nicer with fenders , dynamo lamps and other things that mount onto the brake bolt.
    Thanks, Micheal. The frame I am looking at is set up for recessed brakes. I have a good set of nutted brakes which I can use. I use 28mm tires now, but I am not carrying big loads. If I am carrying a full load, it is important to step up to 32's, or simply a matter of comfort?
    Campione Del Mondo Immaginario

  12. #12
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    The rule of thumb for Uk tourists is that 28 is good for full load on good roads, 32 can take a little rough but if you want to ride (farm/logging) trails or unsurfaced roads for any distance you need something fatter.
    With lighter loads, the 32mm is acceptable on trails. I ride 28 unladen on trails but its asking a lot with a load.
    It really depends on how heavy you+load is, and how good a rider you are.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    I'll second what MichaelW said about the brakes and the tires. I believe that good sidepulls actually stop better than cantilever brakes. I've used 28mm tires with both. If the sidepulls are adjusted close the tire may have to be aired up after it is mounted on the bike. I've also used 28's for several self contained tours, the longest across the country. I don't think I'd go wider unless I expected to do a lot of gravel.

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