Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    141
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    More general cross-country tour questions

    It's getting closer (August 20th I leave) and I'm starting to have new questions crop up, and they're all disparate enough that I figured I'd do a catch-all thread for the answers. Also I just got a new bike (2009 Surly LHT, hasn't been ridden yet) and want to start off on the right foot with it. Thanks guys!

    #1. So I commute to work here in Tucson, AZ. I commute every day rain or shine because I got rid of my car to go bike-only (Tucson is pretty car friendly)

    I have no problem riding in the heavy rain (In fact I enjoy it, cools things down quite a bit, and I shower when I get to work) but the rains here are monsoon rains, and the streets flood. Badly. I'm worried that much rain will destroy my bike. When riding, I sometimes have to go through DEEP puddles (they get up to my hubs). I've heard this will destroy the bottom bracket and hubs pretty much guaranteed, is this true? Also a concern is that the bike can't be brought inside while it's at work, so it might be sitting outside for some of these storms. It doesn't rain all day, it just pours for about an hour or so every day.

    #2. I just got a new Brooks saddle, I haven't put it on yet. I got Proofide for it and I'm going to pretty much just follow Brooks' instructions on how to break it in. My question is for the rain and sun. I have the Brooks cover for it, but I'm not sure it's 100% waterproof. I can't bring my bike inside when I leave it at work, so I have 2 concerns. Is the saddle cover going to protect it from the HOT sun, and will it protect it from the occasional rainstorm that happens while it sits out there?

    Actually those are the big two I can think of right now.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    8,484
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Agentbolt View Post
    It's getting closer (August 20th I leave) and I'm starting to have new questions crop up, and they're all disparate enough that I figured I'd do a catch-all thread for the answers. Also I just got a new bike (2009 Surly LHT, hasn't been ridden yet) and want to start off on the right foot with it. Thanks guys!

    #1. So I commute to work here in Tucson, AZ. I commute every day rain or shine because I got rid of my car to go bike-only (Tucson is pretty car friendly)

    I have no problem riding in the heavy rain (In fact I enjoy it, cools things down quite a bit, and I shower when I get to work) but the rains here are monsoon rains, and the streets flood. Badly. I'm worried that much rain will destroy my bike. When riding, I sometimes have to go through DEEP puddles (they get up to my hubs). I've heard this will destroy the bottom bracket and hubs pretty much guaranteed, is this true? Also a concern is that the bike can't be brought inside while it's at work, so it might be sitting outside for some of these storms. It doesn't rain all day, it just pours for about an hour or so every day.

    #2. I just got a new Brooks saddle, I haven't put it on yet. I got Proofide for it and I'm going to pretty much just follow Brooks' instructions on how to break it in. My question is for the rain and sun. I have the Brooks cover for it, but I'm not sure it's 100% waterproof. I can't bring my bike inside when I leave it at work, so I have 2 concerns. Is the saddle cover going to protect it from the HOT sun, and will it protect it from the occasional rainstorm that happens while it sits out there?

    Actually those are the big two I can think of right now.
    You can't ride around these swimming pools? (I'd avoid immersing bearings.) At least cup-and-cone hubs are easy to service (and it looks like you'll get lots of practice). It seems that most bottom bracket bearings are cartridge (and harder to do simple grease repacking on).

    Maybe, you can get a nylon cover to clip around the bicycle while you are at work. There is also no reason you can't use a more substantial bag around your saddle.

  3. #3
    for affordable housing
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    329
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I can't give a good answer for #1, but a rain cover should keep your saddle in fine shape. You need to protect it, but it's made of leather, not sugar.
    Quote Originally Posted by colombo357 View Post
    Hey you need to put on the bar tape. Please promise me via PM that you will put on the bar tape, because if you don't, you won't have any bar tape on your bars, and that'd be bad because you're supposed to have bar tape on your bars where the bar tape goes.

  4. #4
    ah.... sure. kayakdiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island WA
    My Bikes
    Specialized.... schwinn..... enough to fill my needs..
    Posts
    4,106
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would think a beater would be a better choice for the above mentioned commute. Save the Surly for the weekends. Is it an option using a different bike? I ride my touring bike in all kinds of weather but.................... I don't submerge the hubs or bottom bracket. If I was on a tour and had to do it.... well then I would.
    Save 15% on your first order at Hammer Nutrition!!

    2010 Giant TCR SL 3
    2010 Novara Randonee

  5. #5
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    38,691
    Mentioned
    34 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    #1. You can get a plastic bicycle cover. I have one ... check your local hardware and bicycle shops.

    #2. That's what plastic grocery bags are for. Always keep a plastic grocery bag tucked in the rails under your saddle, and use it when you have to leave the bicycle parked outside.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    My Bikes
    Litespeed Ultimate 2006, Litespeed Pisgah , Specialized Roubaix 2008, Trek Madone 2011
    Posts
    898
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Going thru deep puddles will also allow water into your rims. I would not leave a Brooks saddle on a bike in a public place. Get a Salsa seat post binder and take the post and seat into work with you.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,551
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    IMO- You should ride the Brooks as much as you can before the trip. I use a plastic shower caps as seat covers, but translucent plastic act like a greenhouse. I don't usually leave them on for extended periods or when it is really sunny. The heat can really build up inside. I'm not sure, but this might help during the breakin period. Anyway, it is something to think about.

    I usually repack my wheels before any major tour using Phil Woods waterproof grease. Like njkayaker said, "At least cup-and-cone hubs are easy to service (and it looks like you'll get lots of practice)"

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Illinois (near St. Louis)
    My Bikes
    Specialized Expedition Sport, Surly LHT
    Posts
    831
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a quick release collar for the saddle, and bring it inside when raining.
    DP
    04 Specialized Expedition Sport
    08 Surly LHT

  9. #9
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Parkville, Md
    Posts
    7,589
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am not sure what those questions have to do with the title of your post (More general cross-country tour questions), but...

    I'd be inclined to ride a beater on the days where hubs might be submerged, but If you have cup and cone bearings you can just repack them more frequently. Personally I tend to think that cartridge bearings are not all they are cracked up to be and miss cup and cone bottom brackets. It is nice to be able to inspect and repack bearings.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NE Tx
    My Bikes
    Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial
    Posts
    2,634
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride a beater to work during the monsoon season. Use the Brooks but bring inside. I'd bet it would get wet from condensation likely inside a plastic cover heated by the sun after a rain storm.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    1,410
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not sure if the Complete LHT's are treated with "frame saver", but maybe you should consider it. This is special gunk which is poured inside the frame and swirled around (before the frame is build up with components) which protects the unprotected surfaces from rusting.

  12. #12
    Senior Member tarwheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    My Bikes
    Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Gunnar Crosshairs, De Bernardi SL
    Posts
    6,176
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    1) Avoid riding through puddles. Water can get in your bearings or you might hit a submerged pothole.
    2) If you get caught riding in heavy rain, remove your seatpost after you get home and then turn your bike upside down to make sure that any water drains out. I would go ahead and do that now with your bike since it sounds like you've been riding in the rain a lot. If you don't do this, water will accumulate at the bottom of your seat tube and ruin your bottom bracket.
    3) Keep a plastic grocery bag stuffed between the rails on your Brooks saddle so you can cover it when it rains. Use Proofide on the top and bottom of your Brooks. Rain won't hurt the Brooks if you take care of it. After all, they are made in England and it rains a lot over there.
    4) Keep riding your LHT to work. It's not made of China. If a LHT couldn't handle commuting, it certainly couldn't handle touring. No need to baby it. The LHT is a very sturdy bike designed to handle a lot of abuse. Just make sure you drain the water from the seat post if you're caught in the rain.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Steve.D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Portland OR
    My Bikes
    1972 Schwinn Paramount, 1984 Trek 620, 1984 Trek 720, Fisher X-Caliber
    Posts
    72
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    #1 - Install fenders with long mud flaps. The mud flap on the front wheel will keep water from splashing on the bottom bracket and your feet. Of course, that won't help if you ride through a puddle deeper than your bottom bracket.

    #2 - Here in the Northwest, it rains so often that I would never leave my bike sitting outside all day, day after day. I've been fortunate enough to be able to lock my bike in a parking garage. Some people find an overhanging roof eave or canopy to lock their bikes.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    My Bikes
    Specialized Tricross Sport 2009, Giant Yukon FX3
    Posts
    1,471
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just wondering how much of this advice about water and bearings is based on first hand experience? I've immersed the hubs and bb of my current and previous bike (because I didn't know better) and nothing bad has happened so far, but who knows. I know theoretically it's bad...but have people actually seen rust from this kind of thing?

  15. #15
    Scott n4zou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    My Bikes
    Too Many
    Posts
    2,393
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Go to your local automotive parts store and purchase a tub of marine grade wheel bearing grease.
    Here is an example of what to look for.

    This type of grease is designed for use with boat trailers where the wheels are submerged when putting the boat in or taking it out of the water. Using this grease in your bike hubs and bottom bracket will allow you to flood your hubs with water without harm.
    [SIGPIC]http://www.bikeforums.net/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=57360&dateline=1197386754[/SIGPIC]
    It's easier to pick a Yankee tourist than a bail of cotton.

  16. #16
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Parkville, Md
    Posts
    7,589
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
    Go to your local automotive parts store and purchase a tub of marine grade wheel bearing grease.
    Here is an example of what to look for.

    This type of grease is designed for use with boat trailers where the wheels are submerged when putting the boat in or taking it out of the water. Using this grease in your bike hubs and bottom bracket will allow you to flood your hubs with water without harm.
    Boat trailer grease is good stuff, but I would still recommend fairly frequent maintenance on hubs that were often submerged.

  17. #17
    ah.... sure. kayakdiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Whidbey Island WA
    My Bikes
    Specialized.... schwinn..... enough to fill my needs..
    Posts
    4,106
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
    Go to your local automotive parts store and purchase a tub of marine grade wheel bearing grease.
    Here is an example of what to look for.

    This type of grease is designed for use with boat trailers where the wheels are submerged when putting the boat in or taking it out of the water. Using this grease in your bike hubs and bottom bracket will allow you to flood your hubs with water without harm.
    Well in my experience even with boat/marine grease I would still get damage on the boat trailer. It's all about the seals on a boat axle bearing combination.

    Good grease helps.... The only way to keep water out is to not submerge or have seals that don't allow water in.

    Boat trailers that have a lot of salt water submersion use bearing setup with a spring and extra space. Like the Bearing Buddy. The hub is filled and the spring forces itself toward the hub. Keeping it free of voids. You don't have this on a bike.

    Don't submerge your hubs and bottom bracket. Just not a good idea. If I have to do it I'm going to take my stuff apart and inspect.
    Save 15% on your first order at Hammer Nutrition!!

    2010 Giant TCR SL 3
    2010 Novara Randonee

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •