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Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

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Old 06-27-09, 05:20 AM   #1
gneiss_girl
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Vintage Peugeot for touring?

I love the vintage look and vintage bikes. I found a beautiful 1975 Peugeot Mixte and would love to tweak it for touring. What do you think?
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Old 06-27-09, 09:06 AM   #2
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It will have a French Bottom Bracket so getting a replacement will require ordering it and waiting for it to arrive. This could ruin a tour if your BB craps out on you. This does not happen very often but if it does a typical bike shop will not have a replacement in stock. Your tour will be done.
70's era Peugeot bikes used straight gage steel tubing making them heavier than modern butted tubing. These bikes are called gas pipe bikes because the tubing used was the same tubing used for gas pipes. Dropout spacing will be 120mm so you would need to spread them so a modern rear wheel can be used. You must be very careful you do not break the brake bridge when you do this. Also remember that in the 70's the Touring bike label applied to all road bikes. Vintage touring bike geometry is completely different than the geometry used on modern touring bikes.
Personally; I would not use this bike for touring.
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Old 06-27-09, 10:14 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
It will have a French Bottom Bracket so getting a replacement will require ordering it and waiting for it to arrive. This could ruin a tour if your BB craps out on you. This does not happen very often but if it does a typical bike shop will not have a replacement in stock. Your tour will be done.
70's era Peugeot bikes used straight gage steel tubing making them heavier than modern butted tubing. These bikes are called gas pipe bikes because the tubing used was the same tubing used for gas pipes. Dropout spacing will be 120mm so you would need to spread them so a modern rear wheel can be used. You must be very careful you do not break the brake bridge when you do this. Also remember that in the 70's the Touring bike label applied to all road bikes. Vintage touring bike geometry is completely different than the geometry used on modern touring bikes.
Personally; I would not use this bike for touring.
I'd strongly suggest getting the bike fully overhauled, including having the BB repacked. If this is done correctly, it's extremely unlikely for a BB to fail, even a nearly 40 year old French one. People have toured on bikes just like this in the past, you can, too. Make sure the mechanical condition is at least as sharp as the cosmetics.

Be sure the shop understands cotter pins (your cranks have them holding onto the bottom bracket axle)! there have been many horror stories about people removing them without the right tools or knowledge about how to jury rig it correctly, resulting in it being impossible to reassemble with the original parts.

The original derailleurs may have been Simplexes made of nylon or Delrin. If so, see about a low cost replacement for them. They weren't real durable when new, and that 40 years will affect the plastics.

One really great thing about these old French bikes is long chainstays. If you put on rear panniers your heels are not likely to be hitting these bags on every pedal stroke.

One thing is really important: If it has the original chromed steel rims, get Kool Stop Salmon brake pads to replace the ones that are on there. Steel rims are notoriously bad for braking when wet. Touring seeks out rainstorms.

Yes it's heavy, yes, it's old, but it will work and be reliable.
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Old 06-27-09, 11:14 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
It will have a French Bottom Bracket so getting a replacement will require ordering it and waiting for it to arrive. This could ruin a tour if your BB craps out on you. This does not happen very often but if it does a typical bike shop will not have a replacement in stock. Your tour will be done.
No, your tour will take an interesting new turn. You'll either have an adventure finding a French bottom bracket in a small-town bike shop owner's friend's barn, or you'll ship your Peugeot home and continue the tour on an even cooler bike that you spot in that barn.

I would not attempt a moon landing on your bike, but I'd ride it anywhere I pleased in North America.
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Old 06-27-09, 12:43 PM   #5
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peugeot touring

hi hi was hone a velo sport alpin late 80 s, lighy bike double both chromoly
21 speed, cantilever and derailleur sometimes shimano 600 or an other shimano very wel made look like a dura-ace whiy out the name. ( normaly gold)



and alo own before a velosport cascade 80s same bike very light also (normaly white pearl)

And also im 1990 was peugeot made from canada for us in touring bike hi ad one.
i dont remember the name , he was dark blue
Now i do touring since 6 years with a MIKADO CARTIER made in canada, i rebuilt every thing, wheel,chain,buttom, crank etc. the best one is mikado iberville this what i do with mine.

And i do road with my miele
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Old 06-28-09, 01:28 PM   #6
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We have modern conveniences that weren't available when the Peugot was made: Internet shopping and next-day shipping. If you need a part and want to pay to have it delivered quickly, it can be done (even on Christmas day!)

I love old bikes too for nostalgic reasons. However, I don't love them enough to want to tour on one. I'll stick with my two-year-old LHT. But it could be done without too much trouble. The bike I toured on 30 years ago was only 5 or 6 years old at the time. It worked fine. It would be vintage today, but it would probably still work fine.
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Old 06-28-09, 01:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
It will have a French Bottom Bracket so getting a replacement will require ordering it and waiting for it to arrive. This could ruin a tour if your BB craps out on you. This does not happen very often but if it does a typical bike shop will not have a replacement in stock. Your tour will be done.
70's era Peugeot bikes used straight gage steel tubing making them heavier than modern butted tubing. These bikes are called gas pipe bikes because the tubing used was the same tubing used for gas pipes. Dropout spacing will be 120mm so you would need to spread them so a modern rear wheel can be used. You must be very careful you do not break the brake bridge when you do this. Also remember that in the 70's the Touring bike label applied to all road bikes. Vintage touring bike geometry is completely different than the geometry used on modern touring bikes.
Personally; I would not use this bike for touring.
Peugeot used decent tubes and if you want gas pipe... ride an old Huffy.

My 1974 Peugeot carried me 10,000 miles with nary an issue until a pothole destroyed my fork and as soon as I replace that I'm looking forward to another 10,000 miles.

Velo Orange carries cartridge bottom brackets for Peugeots... this solves the bb issue quite nicely.
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