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  1. #1
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    Touring on 25mm's

    Many of you know me as the guy who keeps stauling, well, Im waiting for my last pay check to come in, and then Im leaving.

    IM so broke, my bike is built up well, except that I am riding on 25mm's , and can not afford any thing different. My other tires have seen their life. FUlly loaded, does this make my wheels weaker? Because I am limited on money, should I buy cheap new tires? the ones I have now are decent maxxi's, CHeap tires in my expierence are bad news. Also, my wheels are both 32h each, carry spokes and I should be safe?

  2. #2
    ah.... sure. kayakdiver's Avatar
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    Just go with what you have. Make sure to keep the pressure high in back. If it gets low I'm guessing you will pinch flat. I would suggest picking up a 28mm tire for a backup. If you do have lots of problems with rear flats....throw it on the back. 25mm up front with a 28mm out back should be fine.

    Of course this isn't ideal..... but I tour on 28's after having done thousands of miles on 32mm.... Never again. Love the 28mm so much more. YMMV.

    I'm not really heavy either. Don't know what your weight is? That can have adverse effects on my suggestion above.

    Your wheels should be fine as well... Just try and keep your load as light as possible.... easier said than done sometimes...

    Best of all... get going and have an experience of a lifetime!! Stop in at the library and give us an update when you can.
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  3. #3
    Barfin' Round the World
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    If your budget dictates - go with what you have. Carry a spare tire. Watch the potholes and railway tracks and go for it. Don't carry too much.

    You won't be the first person to tour with whatever they could afford. I know somebody who did an 8000 mile tour on a $25 bike (not only that, he openly ridiculed my extravagant $700 bike in the process!).

  4. #4
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    Where will you be touring? I haven't had any problem touring on 25s as long as the roads are paved or decent gravel. But I wouldn't want to go on rocky fire roads or muddy trails. And keeping your load as light as possible would help avoid pinch flats with the skinnier tires.

    I've been satisfied with pretty inexpensive tires from both Nashbar (house brand Prima) and Performance (Forte) and try to get them when they're on sale for under $10. Haven't noticed much difference in either durability or performance between these and much more expensive tires.

  5. #5
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    A lot will depend on your weight and amount carried over the back wheel.

    On my first tour I rode a bike with 23's, did not know anything about touring or
    equipment suitability. Did ok but after one week on lots of chip seal roads and about
    700 miles into the ride I discovered the tread showing through the rear tire, it was a
    little disconcerting being nowhere near a bike shop with no spare tire. At the time 1983
    it was hard to find 700c tires except in bike shops, but I carried on with no problems.
    Eventually did buy a new tire (25c) at a bike shop and felt much more reassured.
    My bike at the time had all the weight over the rear wheel ~25 pounds and I was 160.

    The 25c tires will work but bring one of your older spares with you. A larger tire will be
    better but is not mandatory. I do think larger tires help cushion the spokes preventing
    breakages but a bad wheel or spoke quality will still lead to problems.

    As the Nike commercial said -Just do it!!!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Go with the 25's. You should be fine. Try to keep the load light more because of the 32 spoke wheel than because of the tires.

    edit: forgot to mention... I'd skip the spare unless going somewhere very remote.
    Last edited by staehpj1; 07-24-09 at 10:31 AM.

  7. #7
    Senior Member lighthorse's Avatar
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    Ronald,
    I toured across the U.S. on a loaded road bike with narrow tires so it can be done. My experience reflects some of the comments already posted. Keep the rear tire inflated, it is the one that will give you the most flats. Depending on your size, you and your gear may not be any heavier than some riders without gear. I agree that a lot of cheap tires will be a headache for you. As long as you have some level of puncture protection it will help.
    Good luck.
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  8. #8
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    So you're setting off on your bike without any money. Do you plan to stealth camp and dumpster dive? Are you going to beg for shelter and food? Good luck with that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
    I'd skip the spare unless going somewhere very remote.
    I wouldn't.

    Last weekend, I was out for a training ride and had the bead separate from the side-wall on a high-quality (well: expensive) tire that only had 1500-2000 miles on it. Left me stranded in an area with spotty cell phone coverage 15 miles from the nearest bike shop. Luckily, I was able to get cell phone coverage after a one-mile hike and arrange for a buddy to pick me up. Needless to say, I'll be packing a spare tire when I go on tour!

  10. #10
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclesafe View Post
    So you're setting off on your bike without any money. Do you plan to stealth camp and dumpster dive? Are you going to beg for shelter and food? Good luck with that.
    I kind of wondered the same thing, but had decided not to ask. He did say he had a paycheck coming. I don't recall him saying, is the OP's upcoming trip a long one?

  11. #11
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    do u need two different kind of spokes for the rear wheel?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonaldHaines100 View Post
    do u need two different kind of spokes for the rear wheel?
    Typically, the spokes on the "drive" side of the rear wheel are a different length than the "non-drive" side.

  13. #13
    ah.... sure. kayakdiver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonaldHaines100 View Post
    do u need two different kind of spokes for the rear wheel?

    Swing by a local bike shop. They have a handy tool to measure the spokes on your wheel. Have them sell you one drive side... one non drive side and one front. Even if you don't have the tools for the drive side replacement at least you will have it. Better than not. Keep them for the just in case moment.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    The drive side spokes will be a different length than the non dive side. I have found that with some rear wheels I can use the same on both sides in a pinch, but that may not always be the case. If I use the same on both sides, on one side the spoke just isn't screwed as far into the nipple.

    I advise carrying several spokes and a tool to remove the cassette. If you only break one spoke you can limp along pretty well, it is when multiples break that you are in trouble. For a cassette ******* I recommend the Unior. It probably weighs less than an ounce.

  15. #15
    Senior Member bboy314's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclesafe View Post
    So you're setting off on your bike without any money. Do you plan to stealth camp and dumpster dive? Are you going to beg for shelter and food? Good luck with that.
    This is both totally feasible, and a fun way to tour/travel. Begging not required.

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