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Old 09-29-09, 10:43 AM   #1
macaroni steve
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Biking Route Verte - Montreal to QC

We are setting out to bike the route verte from Montreal to Quebec City next week. We have about 5 days to do a loop back to our car that will be parked in the outskirts of Montreal.

Just wondering if there's any suggested loops to do so that we don't have to backtrack along the same route back from QC.

Thnx!
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Old 09-29-09, 10:53 AM   #2
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Can you take the South Shore in one direction, and the North Shore in the other?

Although you will not be on the Route Verte while on the South Shore -- ignoring for now the indirect route via the Eastern townships and the Chaudiere River valley -- a quick look at the map indicates that you probably can take the South Shore while avoiding major roads.
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Old 09-29-09, 11:03 AM   #3
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I don't know if any of these will help you but here are 8 links to information about bike touring in Quebec.

Ray
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Old 09-29-09, 11:10 AM   #4
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We just finished this tour last week, taking the south-of-the-river route through St Jean Richelieu, Magog, Warwick, etc. to Quebec City. We also took the train back to Montreal -- 3 hour ride. We've heard great things about riding back along the north side of the river, which I think is about 200 miles, fully paved and could easily be done in 3 days. Here is a link to some of our trip photos posted to the Davis Bike Club web site:

http://gallery.dbcnewsletter.org/v/September+2009/

If you spend the night in Warwick, we highly recommend Aux Plaisirs Partages. Denis and Ginette were wonderful hosts, the B&B is right on the trail in the middle of town, and breakfasts are fantastic.
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Old 09-30-09, 05:32 AM   #5
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Like DBC Steve (above), we just finished a ride from Montreal to QC via Route Verte 1 through Granby, Magog, Sherbrooke, Warwick, Victoriaville, etc. We parked our car near the train station in QC, took the train to Montreal (very easy to do), and biked back. In fact, the Route Verte passed 10 ft from the parking lot. The riding--about 330 miles--took us 7 days. We were taking our time, and could have done it in 5 if we weren't cutting some days short in order to hit campgrounds.
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Old 09-30-09, 06:28 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macaroni steve View Post
We are setting out to bike the route verte from Montreal to Quebec City next week. We have about 5 days to do a loop back to our car that will be parked in the outskirts of Montreal.

Just wondering if there's any suggested loops to do so that we don't have to backtrack along the same route back from QC.

Thnx!
Oh man it is going to be cold. I hope you don't get rained on.
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Old 10-03-09, 07:48 PM   #7
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Like DBC Steve (above), we just finished a ride from Montreal to QC via Route Verte 1 through Granby, Magog, Sherbrooke, Warwick, Victoriaville, etc. We parked our car near the train station in QC, took the train to Montreal (very easy to do), and biked back. In fact, the Route Verte passed 10 ft from the parking lot. The riding--about 330 miles--took us 7 days. We were taking our time, and could have done it in 5 if we weren't cutting some days short in order to hit campgrounds.
Seaworthy -- You sounded very much like someone we met at a restaurant in North Hatley, except that couple was from New Brunswick I think. They parked at the QC station near the bridge. We boarded our return train from the QC station at the Vieux Port Gare. I recall they rode about 100k per day, while we putzed along at about 60-70 k per day. great ride! Here is a link to some of our pics: http://gallery.dbcnewsletter.org/v/September+2009/

DBC Steve
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Old 08-16-10, 07:09 AM   #8
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Looking for some more Route Verte info: my wife and I plan to drive from Boston to Magog or Warwick, park the car, and ride to Quebec City along Route Verte 1.

What is the surface like? Will we be ok with 23 or 25mm tires?

How well marked is it? What is the scenery like between Warwick and QC? Any recommended camping spots in that stretch?

Thanks!
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Old 08-16-10, 12:50 PM   #9
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Since this thread appears to be resurrected, I have a question as well: How handicapped will I be not speaking a word of French other than bonjour and merci?
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Old 08-16-10, 01:09 PM   #10
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Since this thread appears to be resurrected, I have a question as well: How handicapped will I be not speaking a word of French other than bonjour and merci?
My experience is it depends on who you run into, many people speak english at least enough to be able to get a message across, but many will refuse to but they appreciate effort, as a sign of respect to their culture, if you can learn a few words basic stuff and simple try and you will find a lot less trouble, it is people who make no effort at all that usually get shunned a bit. The people of Quebec have a bad reputation by many as being quite confrontational about language but it is usually the people who make no effort at all to try to speak French even a simple bonjour, or Salut as a greeting can make a big difference. Franco-phones for the most part are not ignorant of English as they are felt as though they are disrespected when someone makes no effort what so ever. they are well aware that you would have to have been living under a rock all your life not to know what bonjour means and not to use it. If they see you struggling to speak French they are often most happy to struggle to speak English in return.for the most part the militant french speaking Canadians are are slim minority and most French speaking Canadians are simply looking for mutual respect.
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Old 08-16-10, 01:46 PM   #11
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There is a fairly large of English speaking folks in the Greater Montreal and the Eastern Townships. At other places certainly more than 50% of the people will speak enough English to manage and 100% of the people working in places like hostels or touristic information are fairly fluent.

Accordingly to the last statistics from the Ministère du Tourisme, only 2.573 American tourists were eaten in 2009 and only the one who was 57,3% eaten complained.
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Old 08-16-10, 01:54 PM   #12
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People you meet in quebec are really nice. Speaking only English should not be a problem. In some rural areas you will run into people who only speak french, but anywhere around the cities or connecting routes should be fine. As a fluent French speaker with an English overtone accent. I find the biggest problem is that people are so quick to help you out, you don't get to speak French at all.

I have done the north shore route several times. I stick to the roads, and avoid bike paths. I find the road is very respectful in Quebec which has adopted the French attitude to cycling sports. I have been adopted by road racers on several occasions coming into quebec. The south shore route west of Montreal, the 132 I think, is the single worst road I have travelled on, but it is not the road to Quebec (same number but not the same terrain), and would only affect you if you started west of Montreal. I have driven the south shore probably a hundred times, and it looks bike friendly enough.

Quebec is my favorite local place to cycle. I haven't done the pettit train dy nord route, but if I was planing what you are, I would look into it. All my cycling in quebec has been in late September, and the weather has been half lovely and half torrential. Around now it should be great.

Also, if I was planing to cycle where you are I would drive 2 hours further down the road, and cycle the section east of Quebec city, which is awesome compared to the nice stuff between Montreal and Quebec. If you are a strong cyclist it might be possible to do a route on both sides of the river, though it is really hilly on the north shore east of Quebec. Another option would be the south shore of the river from quebec east, then come back about 10-20 miles south where there are roads over the high ground there, very rural and nice. There is a Parc Lineaire there also.

Sheldon Brown toured a few trips in Quebec, and there are some posts on his site.

Last edited by NoReg; 08-16-10 at 02:06 PM.
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Old 08-16-10, 02:23 PM   #13
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Crazy Guy on a Bike is always your friend in these types of cases...

http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/l...octype=journal

Journals of trips that went through the province of Quebec can be found at the link above. Enjoy your trip!
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Old 08-16-10, 07:25 PM   #14
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Merci pour vos réponses réfléchies à ma question. Je vais demander à ma fille pour quelques leçons de base en français et obtenir mon passeport.

Thank you for your thoughtful responses to my question. I'll ask my daughter for some basic French lessons and get my passport.

(Or I could just take Google translate with me everywhere I go) ;-)
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Old 08-16-10, 08:42 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by epicshakedown View Post
Looking for some more Route Verte info: my wife and I plan to drive from Boston to Magog or Warwick, park the car, and ride to Quebec City along Route Verte 1.

What is the surface like? Will we be ok with 23 or 25mm tires?

How well marked is it? What is the scenery like between Warwick and QC? Any recommended camping spots in that stretch?

Thanks!
Warwick to QC is straight as an arrow, mostly crushed stone. It has a few rough parts. I'd prefer 28mm tires but then I'm used to even fatter tires. It's paved and a little more complicated as you get close to Lévis. It's flat farmland, not exactly spectacular. It's still fun to ride such long distance without cars around and you should have a tailwind. Try to stop at the falls on Chaudière river in Lévis. I highly suggest you stay on south shore and cross on the ferry instead of the bridge. Warwick is the birthplace of the infamous poutine, "world's finest junk food", according to Sheldon Brown.

Magog is prettier though I'm less familiar with the trail network. Last time I rode Magog - QC, the trails weren't connected yet and rode on highway 143 and took the trail in Richmond.

The only campground I know is Camping Plage des Sables (more like a waterhole with sand around) just east of Victoriaville. There are others but I've always stopped there. You can't miss it.
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Old 08-18-10, 08:36 AM   #16
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Thanks, lots of good info here and found some good crazyguyonabike reports.

Beginning to rethink Warwick to QC plans. What would you all do if you wanted to see some Route Verte highlights, only wanted to drive 5 hours from Boston and had 3 full days (will hope to have more time next summer...). Driving to Saint-Jerome to start P'tit Train du Nord just seems a bit too far.

Thanks!
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Old 08-18-10, 10:02 PM   #17
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This would be an interesting loop: Google Map.

- A to B is Route Verte #5, on road with paved shoulder. It's a popular cycling route.
- B to C is a rail-trail, about 1/3 paved, the rest is crushed-stone. There are campsites near Rivière-à Pierre accessible from the trail.
- C to D is all road. I rode parts once and it was ok. Some roads are part of the Route Verte too.

You can't go wrong with Le P'tit Train du Nord.

A tip to finding campgrounds: type camping in google map and zoom in the area you're interested in, like this: camping.
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Old 08-19-10, 04:25 PM   #18
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Since this thread appears to be resurrected, I have a question as well: How handicapped will I be not speaking a word of French other than bonjour and merci?
Here's a way to introduce yourself in Quebec:

"Bonjour! Je viens des Etats-Unis. Je fais le tour du Québec à vélo. Vous parlez anglais?"

That will show that you're making an effort and you should get a nice reply---in English.

Quebecers, even in urban areas, are warm, open, and hospitable. Although political problems around language are permanent, Quebec is a much more open society today than in the past.

If you want to camp on someone's land heres how to ask permission: ""Bonjour! Je viens des Etats-Unis. Je fais le tour du Québec à vélo. Auriez-vous de la place pour ma tente dans votre champs pour une nuit?"
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Old 08-19-10, 04:46 PM   #19
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Here's a way to introduce yourself in Quebec:

"Bonjour! Je viens des Etats-Unis. Je fais le tour du Québec à vélo. Vous parlez anglais?"

That will show that you're making an effort and you should get a nice reply---in English.

Quebecers, even in urban areas, are warm, open, and hospitable. Although political problems around language are permanent, Quebec is a much more open society today than in the past.

If you want to camp on someone's land heres how to ask permission: ""Bonjour! Je viens des Etats-Unis. Je fais le tour du Québec à vélo. Auriez-vous de la place pour ma tente dans votre champs pour une nuit?"

Merci! I got my daughter to assist with the pronunciation and can repeat the suggested sentences. She assures me that anyone who hears my French will immediately begin speaking English in order to never hear it again.
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Old 08-19-10, 06:36 PM   #20
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Quebec has a very rich history, googling some of it can make the ride much more interesting and give you more to talk about to the locals.
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