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  1. #1
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    Touring with a Jamis Aurora 2001 model

    So I have the opportunity to buy a 2001 Jamis Aurora at a great price, and I am interested in using it for long distance touring. However, when I was looking at it on bikepedia (http://www.bikepedia.com/Quickbike/B...rora&Type=bike) it says under "type" that it is a road/sport bike, but with newer models it changes to touring. So I guess my question is: Did the Jamis Aurora not start as a touring bike, but was built to be one in succeeding years? Or could this be used as a loaded touring bike? Thanks for your help.

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    The model always had at least somewhat of a touring identity.
    Texts have seemed to lean more towards this profile or the other from year to year.
    It has adequate braze-ons it seems (though I'm no tourer).
    & has a high BB as well as a steel fork, triple, large cogs..... etc.

    Others will weigh-in for sure. By all accounts they're fine bikes. I tested one awhile back, I liked it. Higher standover than the dims. would lead one to expect given the frame size.
    What can we compare it to as far as current chrmly. production bikes ? A trek 520 ? Maybe not as tourish as a 520, it is available though.
    I don't see a down-side. The components and wheels are sensible as well.

  3. #3
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    It's a good bike for touring if you install a touring triple crankset with 46-36-26t chainwheels. The standard 52-42-30t and 12-25 8 speed cassette will not provide low enough climbing gears for loaded touring.

    Michael
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    Senior Member sonatageek's Avatar
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    You might need to swap some parts, but if the price is right, it should work. Would you share what the price is?

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    It's $200, in great shape, and my size. I figured the modification with the chain rings would be needed, and wouldn't mind the additional cost. Any other recommendations in part replacement?

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    52-42-30 may be adequate providing that you have a cassette exceeding 30t which I believe that you do; as opposed to a presumed 25t. Have the wheels PRO-trued or at least have the LBS or yourself "tune 'em". If you're a heavy-weight, the wheels could be iffy.

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    Any other responses? If I am going to buy it, it would have to be soon. Like I said I would like it for long distance tours and wouldn't want it falling apart on me. I am about average weight, but young and strong so I may be able to handle the gearing. Also, would the Sora Flightdeck hold up? Or should I find a bike with barend shifters for longdistance touring? Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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    A 22 tooth chainring felt pretty good on my Aurora (probably a 2006 or 07). I bounce between 5 road bikes and sometimes I'm just downright surprised how comfortable my Jamis is after I've been riding some of the others (all of which I think fit me as well). If I wanted to make it bomb proof I'd ditch the brifters and go for barends, but thats my only possible complaint. I've done both front and rear panniers and just rears (well stuffed) and I loved the way the bike handled. You can spend as much as you want for a touring bike, but the 2nd and 3rd thousand dollars will not get you incrementally more service or quality. IMHO. Tom

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by KZONE View Post
    Any other responses? If I am going to buy it, it would have to be soon. Like I said I would like it for long distance tours and wouldn't want it falling apart on me. I am about average weight, but young and strong so I may be able to handle the gearing. Also, would the Sora Flightdeck hold up? Or should I find a bike with barend shifters for longdistance touring? Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Bikepedia starts calling them "touring" in 2005.

    The rear cogs are a little high for loaded touring. It's possible that you could change the rear cassette but the derailer might not handle the larger size (and you might need a longer chain).

    Crankset Shimano Sora, 30/42/52 teeth
    Rear Cogs 8-speed, 12 - 25 teeth

    Sora is reasonable.

    I'm going to guess that the frame geometry hasn't changed. The Aurora isn't quite as long as bikes intended for "loaded touring" but people do fine with it.

    You have three choices:

    1) Buy this decent/inexpensive bike (even though it might not be "perfect").
    2) Wait until something better comes along in your size.
    3) Buy a new bike.

    If it's in good shape, it's hard to be overly picky about $200. And $200 is a good place to start without having to spend $900-1100.

    It's possible that, with more experience, you'll prefer something different but $200 is a cheap way to get that experience (and this bike is a reasonable start).
    Last edited by njkayaker; 10-21-09 at 04:16 PM.

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