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Old 10-18-09, 11:24 PM   #1
undisputed83
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If I were to go on a 10,000 mile bike tour...

What would I need? Obviously I was thinking I'd need a small tent. Though I've heard of people taking a small tarp and a hammock.

The rest I'll do in list format.


Sleeping bag.
Tools for bike maintenance.
Hygene pack (Soap, Razors, Deoderant, Toothpaste, Toothbrush)
Two or three days worth of clothes and Bibs.
Bike Pump and a couple tubes.
Maps.
Flashlight and batteries.
Cellphone and charger.


Then what is best for food? Should I bring a small grill with me to cook some stuff on? I suppose I could buy some canned veggies and other canned goods. I don't see how I could bring meat along. Unless I found a campsite close to a town... went and bought the meat and cooked it right then. Meat is important for protein. So I guess that scenario would work. What kind of a diet would I want to put myself on, biking 100 miles per day could cause me to lose weight.


Another thing I'd like to do is buy a trailer to put everything in. I see other people touring using bags and such. I don't think I'd be comfortable with that set up. I'd rather tow it. Could I do it in one of those enclosed trailers I see people putting their kids in? They look like they have a lot of room.



What would you guys suggest with what I have above? Am I realistic or unrealistic?
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Old 10-18-09, 11:42 PM   #2
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Judging by light camping all seems reasonable. Bring peanut butter, nuts or both. Trail mix, de-hyd. fruit etc.. I do believe that you ought to consider a tent rather than tarp. Small tents can be had at a low price. Figure on the seccond to, not the smallest, it'll make a big difference to you and not much harder to carry. A special roll-up mat to place under the sleeping bag will make a big difference. Between this and a non-tiny tent, the hammock is rendered less necessary. You can always grab a meat meal on the fly. Storing and cooking meat is problematic. Spam, tuna .....
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Old 10-19-09, 12:03 AM   #3
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I figured I'd get a medium sized tent, that way I could empty out my trailer of everything I didn't want getting wet in a possible rain storm. And if it's supposed to rain all day long, I could simply stay put at my current camp site.
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Old 10-19-09, 02:13 AM   #4
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trailer != light weight

heavy weight = slower

How many times have you done a 100 mile ride? Ever done two back to back?

Meat can be fine unrefrigerated for a day or two depending on the weather and the meat.

Google packing lists

Google long distance cycling diets
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Old 10-19-09, 04:39 AM   #5
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If I were to go on a 10.000 mile bike tour:
I'd make sure my stuff would be what I wanted, that is, I'd be sure to try stuff out before leaving.
That way I'd know I'd be having fun instead of fighting against my equipment.
e.g.: what kind of stove? petrol? petroleum? multi fuel? wood? spirits? etc. etc. it depends on where you're going and probably most of all on your own preferences.
take the time to find out whether you like camping with a tent (borrow one) or hammock, or even B&B / hotels.
find out whether you want to ride long distance every day, or just until you're tired or find a nice place.
It all interconnects.

but: enjoy... (where are you going btw?)
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Old 10-19-09, 06:01 AM   #6
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If you tour 10,000 miles, it would be a shame to skip third world countries so what I did when when I toured rural china is carry some spare parts:

a cheap spare rear der
extra spokes
a really small light tool for backing off a cassette
fiber spokes for short term fix
extra set disc brake pads
shift and brake cable (one each)a folding tire
3 extra tubes
2 patch kits
a few spare bolts and nuts
spare quick link and some extra chain links
extra small frame pump.

I'll probably get flamed for posting this, carrying this extra stuff, but i like to be sure I can keep rolling.
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Old 10-19-09, 07:49 AM   #7
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What you need for a 10,000 mile tour isn't very different than what you need for a 500 mile tour. You'll find multiple packing lists on this site and elsewhere. Here is one of mine that was annotated with a few comments after the trip:
http://www.bikerussia.com/equipment

A few additional comments on what is posted here:
Tent vs. Tarp - don't know where you are going, but I like something with mosquito netting
Spare parts - I carried at least as much as jbpence listed, though I tend to be extra cautious on those things.

One suggestion is to do one or more shorter shakedown trips as well before embarking on the long trip. That will give you a good chance to try out some of your equipment choices.
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Old 10-19-09, 08:00 AM   #8
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Figuring an average of 50 miles/day, 10,000 miles is 200 riding days. Adding in some rest days, breakdown repair days, and sightseeing, it could easily run to 9 months or more.

Depending on your route, you will be riding through several seasons. Thus, your equipment needs may change as you ride.

I'd also suggest taking a stove and cooking pots as that gives you a wider range of foods to eat and a warm meal on a cold day is always welcome.

Good luck,

Ray
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Old 10-19-09, 10:48 AM   #9
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I really appreciate the imput and everything. I will likely do this next year. I'm an online poker player and do pretty well with it. So I figure if I bring my lap top with me, and I can stop at a couple libraries per week. I could pocket some money to keep funding my trip. I won't have to win much each week to keep everything going. And I'll make sure I have enough set aside to start with anyway.
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Old 10-19-09, 11:01 AM   #10
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We've posted a bunch of info like what you are asking on our website. You can find it here: http://familyonbikes.org/resources.htm

As for diet, we've found a higher fat diet seems to work much better than low fat. We don't eat a lot of meat, but do eat cheese and yogurt on a very regular basis.
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Old 10-19-09, 11:11 AM   #11
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Where makes a big difference. One lady upon retiring rode the perimeter of the continental US on what was basically a cheap road bike.

IOW, any touring bike (or even a converted mtn bike) would work here. In the 3rd world you want really tough gear.
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Old 10-19-09, 11:24 AM   #12
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I agree, where makes a big difference. If you were going to SE Asia, I would advise you not to bother with any camping gear or cooking equipment.
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Old 10-19-09, 12:46 PM   #13
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Where do you plan to go? I'd add rain gear and cold weather clothes to that list.

For choice of stove you'll want to figure out where you are going as to the availability of buying more fuel. Don't forget the pots!

I would suggest doing a one-week tour before your 10,000 mile tour to test our your gear - a shakedown if you will.

If you don't want to carry it all in panniers I'd suggest a BoB one-wheeled trailer.
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Old 10-21-09, 05:59 AM   #14
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Don't forget some comfortable off the bike clothes and footwear (sandals if it is warm). I use a bibler tripod bivy. Those are expensive, but it doesn't collect condensation, which is great for a quick morning exit. Being comfortable off the bike is key for me. Also make sure you can carry like 4 water bottles- camelbaks are annoying when you tour. Make sure your bike is ubercomfortable. And don't put off eating.
edit to add: I wouldn't bring more than 2 days of riding clothes. If you are touring in the states laundry is always availible. If you wear out a an item it can be replaced on the road or sent to you.

Last edited by sportystyle; 10-21-09 at 06:02 AM.
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Old 10-21-09, 12:46 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
What would I need?
What you'd need would not be much different than for a trip of a few days. (Though, 10,000 miles might imply that you are going to see different seasons, which might require different clothing and sleeping bags).

Quote:
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Then what is best for food? Should I bring a small grill with me to cook some stuff on? I suppose I could buy some canned veggies and other canned goods.
A grill implies that you are going to build fires, which tends to be very inconvenient. If you want to cook or have warm food, get a backpacking stove (do some research into these first).

Clearly, you'd have to carry all of your food if you are in the wilderness.

One advantage of (most) bicycling touring is that you can buy food on the way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
What would you guys suggest with what I have above? Am I realistic or unrealistic?
You need to do more research and provide more details before asking basic/open-ended questions.

Where is this 10,000 mile trip going to be done?
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Old 10-22-09, 12:54 AM   #16
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10,000 miles is probably a lot more than I'll actually do. I was thinking about a 4-5 month excusion around the country. Leave in late april... head south to the carolinas. I figure I'll follow US Rt. 1. And from there I'll head west. All the way to the pacific. I've always wondered what it would be like to swim in it. Once I get there i'll probably end off in the southern cali area. Maybe a little below LA. I'll probably go through Vegas too. Just to say I've been there. I don't know what direction I'll head after Cali. I will have to cross back over the rockies. I bet that will be difficult?

How much harder will it be towing a 40lb trailer? I'm guessing it'll be about that heavy.

And for food, I want to cook it myself. I figure I could bring a couple pastic gladware containers to pack my left overs. I could cook pasta one night for dinner... and pack the left overs for lunch the next day. I can eat it cold left over. I will only carry a day or two worth of food on me to reduce the weight of my trailer. I just wanna be cost affective too. I could realistically spend probably just $10 a day or so on food and drinks if I'm smart about it.
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Old 10-22-09, 01:31 AM   #17
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This is my packing list based on the 5000 km tour I did in Australia in 2004, as well as several other shorter tours. It also has randonneuring in mind so some of the stuff might not apply to tours that do not include randonneuring events:
http://www.machka.net/articles/packinglist.htm

As mev says, what you take for a long tour is probably not going to be much different than what you would take for a short tour. In fact, I tend to carry more for a short tour than I do for a long tour.


But here's the thing ... stop guessing and start doing. Go out on practice weekend tours. Try panniers, borrow a trailer if you can to try it, test out your cooking ideas, ride on all sorts of terrain and in various weather.
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Old 10-22-09, 01:48 AM   #18
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I'm 100% positive I won't like panniers. I don't even like wearing a backpack. I'd rather tow everything behind me... and keep my body and bike free of any clutter.
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Old 10-22-09, 02:05 AM   #19
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I'm 100% positive I won't like panniers. I don't even like wearing a backpack. I'd rather tow everything behind me... and keep my body and bike free of any clutter.
You don't wear panniers. And panniers on the bicycle are vastly different from wearing a backpack. If you've never tried panniers, you don't know that you won't like them.
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Old 10-22-09, 03:59 AM   #20
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Quote:
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You don't wear panniers. And panniers on the bicycle are vastly different from wearing a backpack. If you've never tried panniers, you don't know that you won't like them.
I've seen panniers. They're like bags or briefcase looking things that hang off the sides of your bike rack over your back bike tire, and there are ways to rig some to the front of your bike as well. And I STILL insist I wouldn't like them. I'm going to purchase a BOB.
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