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  1. #1
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Mounting thorn proof tubes

    I recently received a pair of Sunlite Thorn Proof tubes, 700c. Now I'm confused, as usual. When placed on my 700c rim, there is a 4 inch overlap, making it impossible to mount the tire. I'm use to having an inch or two of overlap with standard tubes, but due to the thickness of these Sunlites, ANY overlap would make them hard to fit them into a tire.

    Anyone with thick tube experience? What am I missing here? Are they even worth messing with?
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  2. #2
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Overlap? I don't get it, what do you mean by overlap?

    FWIW: I didn't find thorn proof tubes to be worth the extra cost and weight. Ditto for slime tubes which are tough to patch and messy as well.

    I actually prefer thinner tubes and buy them a bit on the narrow side (I use ones that say something like 700x19-26 with a 700x28 tire).

    As far as goat head thorns go. If riding on the road I found that being very careful where you pull off the pavement helps immensely. Also it is a good idea to check for goat heads immediately before getting started again if you do pull off the pavement. That way you can usually get rid of them before they do any damage.

  3. #3
    Senior Member wheel's Avatar
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    Whats the tire size again and what is tube size. 700cc 32mm or what? Making sure these are the same may relieve your problems. I have had no problems when these sizes match. You may need to push the tire bead into the rim. Try putting the tube in the tire first and then mounting the tire. The thicker rubber tends to keep the tire from seating.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    The wheel is 700c, the tire is 32mm, the tube is labeled 700c for 25-28mm. The problem is when placed around the rim, there are 4 inches of tube too much. I call that overlap. No way I can stuff that much extra tube into a tire. Weird.

    Answers to this question posted at CG have convinced me thorn proof tubes are not worth the hassle.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  5. #5
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    The wheel is 700c, the tire is 32mm, the tube is labeled 700c for 25-28mm. The problem is when placed around the rim, there are 4 inches of tube too much. I call that overlap. No way I can stuff that much extra tube into a tire. Weird.

    Answers to this question posted at CG have convinced me thorn proof tubes are not worth the hassle.
    Weird. I have never, at least not in recent years, had that problem. Then again I don't use thick tubes. For the tube/tire combinations I use, with just barely enough air in the tube to make it take shape, I can typically get it to fit in the tire with no wrinkles.

    BTW: I typically like Continental tubes, but have used cheapie house brand ones without incident as well.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    The wheel is 700c, the tire is 32mm, the tube is labeled 700c for 25-28mm. The problem is when placed around the rim, there are 4 inches of tube too much. I call that overlap. No way I can stuff that much extra tube into a tire. Weird.
    I've seen this once or twice. What I usually do is:

    1) Get another tube, if possible

    or

    2) Put the wheel inside the tire, and secure one bead to the rim. I then inflate the tube using as little air as possible. I use the valve to push the tube up into the tire, then start seating the remaining bead by hand. I squeeze the tube into the tire before sliding a section of bead over the rim. This helps to prevent the tire from pinching the tube against the rim, which will eventually lead to a flat. Once the bead is completely seated, I then inflate the tube to the required pressure.

    In my experience, Option #2 only works if you can install the tire by hand. Whenever I've had a large tube and a tire that was so tight I needed to use levers to get the last section of the bead in place, I've ended up pinching the tube and it goes flat sooner rather than later. Like staehpj1, I've given up on Slime and other fancy tubes and just use regular tubes; the others aren't worth the hassle. If I'm worried about punctures, I buy a different tire rather than a different tube...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Put the wheel inside the tire, and secure one bead to the rim. I then inflate the tube using as little air as possible. I use the valve to push the tube up into the tire, then start seating the remaining bead by hand. I squeeze the tube into the tire before sliding a section of bead over the rim. This helps to prevent the tire from pinching the tube against the rim, which will eventually lead to a flat. Once the bead is completely seated, I then inflate the tube to the required pressure.
    Yeah, that's pretty much the way I install a standard tube. But not with the very thick thorn proof with 4 inches of overlap. No way.

    I've been in touch with Niagra Cycle Works about this silly problem. They have offered to pay the postage for return. I'm gonna take the tubes to my lbs for their opinion just out of curiosity, hoping they can shed some light on this problem that ought not to be.

    Thanks.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  8. #8
    Senior Member wheel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    The wheel is 700c, the tire is 32mm, the tube is labeled 700c for 25-28mm. The problem is when placed around the rim, there are 4 inches of tube too much. I call that overlap. No way I can stuff that much extra tube into a tire. Weird.

    Answers to this question posted at CG have convinced me thorn proof tubes are not worth the hassle.
    Sounds like they labeled the tube wrong. I roll with 700cc 32mm thorns, standard equipment in thorn land Arizona.

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