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Old 01-30-10, 02:08 PM   #1
h_curtis
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Touring on a racing bike with NO trailer, no support and camping all the way

I know there are racks that go on bikes that clamp on the tubes and can hold up to 50 lbs. Seems like quite a bit of weight. My bike is a Chas Roberts 531 steel frame with Campy Omega rims (32 spoke). I am 6'2" and weigh 185 lbs. I have light weight tent, bag and such. Don't need too much extra clothing. First ride will be a week long for a trial and the next will be 40-50 days. What do you think, am I pressing my luck on the frame and those wheels?

I did a search and most talk about trailers. I don't want to do that.
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Old 01-30-10, 02:22 PM   #2
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Recent relevant discussion here:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-one-saddlebag

A steel frame with reasonable wheels, a large saddlebag and handle bar bag, and the appropriate attitude will likely work for you. .
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Old 01-30-10, 02:23 PM   #3
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cycled my way up lake michigan shoreline last year and saw a few nice road bikes carrying little more than a tent, blanket, toiletries and map.

As long as the weather is comfortable, You'll be fine. And you'll probably be happier, zipping from one town to the next, not carrying 50 pounds of crap.
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Old 01-30-10, 02:24 PM   #4
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well if your not carrying much gear you'll be fine.have a good one.
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Old 01-30-10, 03:10 PM   #5
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http://www2.arnes.si/~ikovse/weight.htm
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Old 01-30-10, 03:39 PM   #6
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Since your bike is a souf' london lovely, you should look into a huge (camper longflap) saddlebag.

can you post a picture of your Roberts? I have two myself... one lugged vintage and one modern fillet brazed.
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Old 01-30-10, 03:59 PM   #7
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I was on the road for about a month and a half on a Devinci Chicane (entry road bike), and another month and a half on a 2007 Schwinn LeTour (not a touring bike despite the name) after the Devinci was stolen. I had no problems with the Devinci. I broke two spokes on the Schwinn. Rear wheel cassette side of course. I weighed around 155 and usually kept the total weight of me, bike, and gear under 210 the whole time. Sometimes I would load up on firewood before camping though, and that is how you break spokes.
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Old 01-30-10, 04:05 PM   #8
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Interesting title for the thread. Do the words "racing" and "steel" really ever go together anymore? Maybe "steel" and "sport-touring," but I thought the thread was going to be about touring on a Tarmac or Madone when I clicked on it.
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Old 01-30-10, 05:17 PM   #9
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Recent relevant discussion here:

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-one-saddlebag

A steel frame with reasonable wheels, a large saddlebag and handle bar bag, and the appropriate attitude will likely work for you. .

Great thread and links on that one too. Thank you!
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Old 01-30-10, 05:21 PM   #10
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I did it on a Felt F-80.



500 mile tour:
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...League-City-TX
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Old 01-30-10, 05:24 PM   #11
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Great site. Lots to learn there. Thanks. That link is on that thread that was posted earlier as well. Seems my old racing bike is more of a sport touring bike by today standards as someone pointed out. lol
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Old 01-30-10, 05:33 PM   #12
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Since your bike is a souf' london lovely, you should look into a huge (camper longflap) saddlebag.

can you post a picture of your Roberts? I have two myself... one lugged vintage and one modern fillet brazed.
The lugs on this bike are insane, but I don't have any pictures of it that shows that very well. Here are the pictures I do have. I purchased it new from a bike shop that had two of them. The owner of the shop bought the frames at a bike show. This bike is from about 1989ish and it was all Campy Chorus. It had down tube shifters, I changed out for the ergos. The old shifters had a little lever to switch from friction to syncro. Wow, that was back there a ways. Anyway, here a a few shots.





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Old 01-30-10, 05:58 PM   #13
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Tubus Fly rack can go on a road bike with no braze-ons, I think it's rated for something like 40-50 pounds. I used it for credit card touring. Mounts to a quick release adaptor (sold separately) and the brake mount.

www.thetouringstore.com


Unless you are super-strong or your route is very flat, you might want to look into getting some low gears if you are camping - hard to keep the weight low enough for regular road gearing, even road triple is a little too high.
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Old 01-30-10, 06:26 PM   #14
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The lugs on this bike are insane, but I don't have any pictures of it that shows that very well. Here are the pictures I do have. I purchased it new from a bike shop that had two of them. The owner of the shop bought the frames at a bike show. This bike is from about 1989ish and it was all Campy Chorus. It had down tube shifters, I changed out for the ergos. The old shifters had a little lever to switch from friction to syncro. Wow, that was back there a ways. Anyway, here a a few shots.





This bike is screaming for a Silver stem and seat post. Nice bike.
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Old 01-30-10, 06:47 PM   #15
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Shouldn't be any problem to go touring with a race bike as long as you don't take too much of a load and the gearing is appropriate for you, the load, and the terrain.
I've gone on bike camping trips with my Cannondale crit-geometry frame and saw no serious problems with it other than not allowing the use of regular fenders or tires wider than about 25mm.
I'd suggest using a regular rear rack and panniers using vinyl-coated P-clips. They provide solid support and avoid the issue of possible overloading of the seatpost with a post-mounted rack.
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Old 01-30-10, 06:52 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by h_curtis View Post
I know there are racks that go on bikes that clamp on the tubes and can hold up to 50 lbs. Seems like quite a bit of weight. My bike is a Chas Roberts 531 steel frame with Campy Omega rims (32 spoke). I am 6'2" and weigh 185 lbs. I have light weight tent, bag and such. Don't need too much extra clothing. First ride will be a week long for a trial and the next will be 40-50 days. What do you think, am I pressing my luck on the frame and those wheels?
The big problem with race frames is the short chainstays. They mean that there isn't a ton of clearance for panniers. Racks like the Tubus fly will fit, but if you fit large panniers you may find yourself kicking them with every pedal stroke.

Agree with valygrl: gearing may also be a problem. I managed to pack 22lbs of gear and 5lbs of water (2 x 24oz bottles + 1 20oz) onto my 23lb touring bike. With a standard road triple (52/39/30) and 12-27 cassette getting over some hills was more work than I wanted. I ended up installing a trekking crank (48/36/26) and it made my ride down the Pacific coast much more enjoyable. I'd recommend doing some training rides with your bike and gear before leaving on a week-long tour. That way you can sort out any potential equipment issues before you're on the road for real.
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Old 01-30-10, 07:01 PM   #17
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If you are going ultra light, ditch the tent for a tarp and/or maybe a bivy sack. Kinda depends on what level of comfort you want and the weather though. You can put up a decent lean-to with your bike supporting one side and staking it to the ground on the other side. I prefer to bring a tarp and bivy sack so I have somewhere to keep the gear dry and cook without getting wet when it rains.
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Old 01-30-10, 07:49 PM   #18
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Hopefully you can fit some 28mm tires in there. Get your sleeping bag in a compression sack and see what kind of velcro/webbing straps it would take to suspend it between the brake hoods or simply strap it on the bars. Your frame looks big enough for this Jandd frame bag. It's big enough to fit leggings and light rainjacket, cell phone, powerbars.

http://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FFP

With one of the narrow light weight Tubus racks you could strap what is needed on the sides/top.

That lightweight website is great
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Old 01-30-10, 10:17 PM   #19
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This bike is screaming for a Silver stem and seat post. Nice bike.
I have the original aero Chorus seat post, but needed a longer one. So I picked up a carbon record. The stem is what cam on the bike new. It is a Cinelli, but in black as you can see.
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Old 01-30-10, 10:20 PM   #20
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I know people are mentioning a triple etc. I am one of those people that like to push a big gear. I don't know why I prefer it, but I tend not to drop down to the lowest gears unless I am really climbing something very steep. You can see where I am from. Plenty of steep hills around here. lol

Thanks for all the replies.
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Old 01-30-10, 10:26 PM   #21
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I've taken several trips on a similar bike, a Nishiki lugged CroMo steel and my main gripe with the lighter frame is that it's a bit too flexible when even moderately loaded with gear. When you first take off with packed panniers it sorta feels like the front end is moving side to side independently of the rear of the bike

Just something to be aware of but I did switch frames after one season for that reason.

Bruce
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Old 01-30-10, 11:14 PM   #22
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This 1973 PX10 has about as many touring miles as it has race miles. I'm not sure why Peugeot put eyelets on the rear dropouts of their "high end" racing bike, but it did work with a rear rack.

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Old 01-30-10, 11:32 PM   #23
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I know people are mentioning a triple etc. I am one of those people that like to push a big gear. I don't know why I prefer it, but I tend not to drop down to the lowest gears unless I am really climbing something very steep. You can see where I am from. Plenty of steep hills around here. lol
The question is: will you like pushing a big gear when your bike weighs 40lbs more than normal? Or when you've got 3 big climbs under your belt... and one more to go before you get to your destination? And will you want that sort of big gear-grind day after day?
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Old 01-31-10, 12:40 AM   #24
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That Peugeot has a 40 tooth small chainring with an 28 tooth "granny", and it worked for several tours, including the Pacific Coast Route. However, I was in my early 30's and in racing shape at the time. Today, I ride a 22 tooth small chainring with a true 34 tooth granny. As my Aunt says, "getting old isn't for wimps", but it sure seems that way sometimes.
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Old 01-31-10, 07:44 AM   #25
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you can tour on just about anything, so definitely go for it on your practice tour.

besides the gearing, those lightweight rims with only 32 spokes could be a problem. bringing a couple of spare spokes and a spoke wrench might be a good idea.

as far as what to bring, try to keep it light & simple, and don't expect to get it right first or even second time around. it's a very personal, evolving kind of experience. others experience may or may not apply to you.

best of luck on your ride
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