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Thread: water bag

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    water bag

    Nothing in the search results and I need a bag(s) of some sort for pedaling a gallon of water thru desert country. I use panniers and 3 water bottle holders.

    Recommendations based on experience?
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

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    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    If you want bags, I found the Platypus 2+ liter to be nice. It is a reasonable size and it stands up. That said I find it works just as well to either use recycled sports drink bottles or bottled water bottles. Stick a few in each pannier (or just under the flap). That way you can pick up or discard them and avoid carrying anything when you don't need it.

    So maybe carry one Platypus 2+ liter and augment it with recycled bottles or just use recycled bottles exclusively (other than the bottles in your cages).

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    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    Nothing in the search results and I need a bag(s) of some sort for pedaling a gallon of water thru desert country. I use panniers and 3 water bottle holders.

    Recommendations based on experience?
    MSR Dromedary bags here is a recent review on them.

    I have several of them in different sizes. I quite often fill the 4 liter one, let it lay out in the sun, attach the shower gizmo and wash at will.

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    ah.... sure. kayakdiver's Avatar
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    I'm into simple.. my favorite is using two liter soda bottles... when not in use I just squish the down with the lid off.... take up little space, weigh little and cost nothing. Gets the job done for me. Plus I can see if it's getting nasty inside.
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    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    staehpj1
    If you want bags, I found the Platypus 2+ liter to be nice
    +1-- We used a couple of Platypus bladders for extra water going through eastern Oregon, southern Idaho , and Wyoming. The good thing about them is they weigh very little and roll up in a very small package. In retrospect any of the collapsible bladders would have worked fine, and the Nalgene has a larger opening, making it easier to fill. Even "out of the desert", extra water also comes in handy if you know you are going to dry camp. Makes cleanup and cooking easier.

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    friction baby, friction D.B. Cooper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    Nothing in the search results and I need a bag(s) of some sort for pedaling a gallon of water thru desert country. I use panniers and 3 water bottle holders.

    Recommendations based on experience?
    I have used this:

    http://http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002...SIN=B0024O0X5C
    1984 trek720
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    1970s Schwinn Deluxe Breeze

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    friction baby, friction D.B. Cooper's Avatar
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    1984 trek720
    2005 trek 520
    1996 Cannondale T1000
    1970s Schwinn Deluxe Breeze

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyakdiver View Post
    I'm into simple.. my favorite is using two liter soda bottles... when not in use I just squish the down with the lid off.... take up little space, weigh little and cost nothing. Gets the job done for me. Plus I can see if it's getting nasty inside.
    yep i like soda bottles too. last summer i found some 3l bottles by shasta beverage. bad soda, great water container.

  9. #9
    rhm
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    Dunkin Donuts sells a box of coffee, a cardboard box with a bladder in it. I certainly wouldn't use one that's had coffee in it; and I'm not sure how you'd fill it (but obviously Dunkin can do it), but it would seem a pretty economical solution. Same goes for the bladder from a box of wine; you just have to figure out the easy way to fill it.

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    I have used empty bottles (1.5l), platypus bladders, and MSR dromedary bags.

    Empty bottles work for one or two trips, but for a better long term solution, bags are more packable, and more durable.

    The MSR bags are worth the cost. They will last for years, they make good pillows and they are versatile to mate with water filters or showers etc. Since they have a squirt-top, a small mouth, and a large mouth, they are easy to fill, drink from, and also have a small stream for hand/face washing. The platypus bladders eventually crack at the edges (I had 2), but are decent. The difference is the MSR bags can be tossed onto rocky desert ground, and easily lashed to the tops of racks, or hung in trees... The platypus bags don't stand up to heavy use like this in my experience.

    If you plan on touring in places where you need 3-4 days water at a time, I would seriously consider 2 four-liter MSR bags. One 6L bag, plus two frame bottles will last me 4 days in the desert, (cooking, drinking, and only minor cleaning). If you need less water, simply leave the bag half full...

    great bit of kit in my opinion.

  11. #11
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    MSR Dromedary bags are what the cyclotourist wants. tough enough to simply strap to the rack and panniers, get 2 4 liter, or a 10 liter size for the desert, put it on the back rack - you will appreciate it.

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    yep,
    2 4L bags, one in the bottom of each front pannier is also a great way to carry the weight offroad... nice and stable. I usually put my one 6L bag in a front pan, or in a large saddlebag under my saddle depending on what else I am carrying and whether I can balance the front end.

  13. #13
    mev
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    I've used: MSR dromedary bags, Sea to Summit bag and Platypus. All seem to do what is necessary.

    I've generally used combinations of smaller bags to load things up. For example, when cycling around Australia I carried up to 18L of water with the following "loading sequence":

    - 3 bottles on bike = 2L
    - camelbak = 3L, 5L total
    - 2 normal water bottles in pannier = 3L, 8L total
    - second bladder in camelbak = 3L, 11L total
    - sea-to-summit bag = 4L, 15L total
    - miscellaneous bottles bought and put in panniers = 3L, 18L total

    On a different trip across Russia, my cycling partner had a 10L MSR bag and I had a 4L MSR bag. We used the 10L just for the last kilometers before camping. Worked well there, but I'd generally find a collection of many smaller bags worked better than one large 10L bag.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the responses. I like the idea of a couple of 4 liter bags. Will take a look at the options along those lines. I think 3 caged bottles and a gallon in bags will be adequate for this trip, but 2 four liter bags will allow me more reserve. Better too much than too little.

    Better not be any 8% grades on this ride. That's a lot of weight. 'Course I could lose 15 lbs before starting to compensate. Nah.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  15. #15
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    This is not too far OT-- We made this insulated liner to go into one my front panniers. We were riding in +100F weather, and could not keep food or water cool. On a rest day in Cody , Wyo, we went over to Wal Mart and got a blue camp pad and a roll of duct tape. It works well, especially if you can get some ice at a convenience store or gas station during the day. It also keeps cheese from getting too slimy. I've since replaced these panniers, but fabricated a liner for my new ones.

    Placing water containers on top of the racks or where they are exposed to the sun makes for good shower water but poor drinking water.






  16. #16
    Senior Member dogontour's Avatar
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    I did something similar to Doug64. I filled up two 2 liter platypus bladders on the days that there was little chance for water refills in the Southern Utah desert. I unrolled my ridge rest pad which I carry on top of my rear rack, laid the bladders on the pad and rolled it back up tight and restrapped it to my rack. Kept the water cooler than if they had been in the sun.

  17. #17
    It's true, man.
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    Anyone used the Ortlieb water bag?

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