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  1. #1
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    Raingear...any good suggestions?

    Just wondering what people touring are using for raingear. Are you going with Gortex or just a rainsuit?

    And what do you think of tenting in Ireland? I usually do the hostel or B&B thing, but I'm considering taking the tent. What do ya think?

    Roadrunner

  2. #2
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
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    I use thinsolate rain jacket( what, cheap Gortex?) and either rain pants made of the same material or rain proof tights. Have used them and will use them when touring.
    However, as another member stated, I have a basic problem subjecting my bike to such adverse conditions. Bad for the drive train?
    ps- I also have rain proof helmet cover, gloves, and water tight socks. Someday I will use them, meanwhile- I live in Southern California. What they say, "it never rains in Sourthern California, but when it pours it pours."
    Last edited by cyclezealot; 03-14-02 at 12:40 AM.

  3. #3
    Honorable Member beowoulfe's Avatar
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    When it starts to rain.......in the end it doesn't matter much. You're going to get wet. Rain jackets for me are terrible. They get too hot in there. I just use a bicycle rain poncho and let it flap all around. I use the thumb loops to stretch the thing out over the handle bars and the air circulates and I stay reasonably cool. The chest is protected from the direct assault and I appreciate that. I leave my legs bare, the poncho protects my seat pretty well.

    As for my bike, I always carry WD40 to spray down the components after a wet day. The bike is still intact to this day and rust free, but I'm not very anal about it.
    Greenspeed GTO 1027

  4. #4
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    Gore-Tex is a problem due to the fact that it doesn't let enough moisture escape when you sweat a lot.
    Je vais à vélo, donc je suis!

  5. #5
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    Ireland has plenty of good cheap hostels, independant and IYHA. Bed and breakfast accomodation is also widespread. A tent is not neccessary, and with hostelling luggage, you will travel much easier.

    Any breathable waterproof will struggle when the humidity is high. Irish mist makes it very hard for membranes to transmist water vapour out.
    On a climb Gortex or any other waterproof may feel clammy.

    Cheaper alternatives to Gortex work pretty much the same, but break down after a year or 2 of use.

    I have been using a pile and pertex combination over this winter with very comfortable results, but mine is too warm for the big hill I climb. The thinner versions are better for spring use.

    http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/prodmain.htm

    I would strongly recomend pertex (nylon microfibre) over gortex for water-resistant leggings. You dont need total waterproofing on the bike if you wear synthetic leggings underneath.

    Dont forget to fit fenders/mudguards.

  6. #6
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    Well, to tell you the truth, I find Gortex to be a bit warm. I have a Gortex cyclying jacket I bought years ago, but it's nearly in threads. In late fall and winter it's nice to have. I've never heard of Microfiber-waterproof, but I've got my eye on some stuff in Nasbar and Performance catalogs. The bike I'm taking on this trip is not my favorite, and I don't use it much, so getting it wet for a few days won't hurt it. My last trip to Ireland in April it didn't rain at all, but I don't expect that to happen again.

    Anyway, thanks for all the good advice.

    Hey...where in Upstate are you from? I'm here in Cooperstown.

    Roadrunner

  7. #7
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Originally posted by MichaelW
    Dont forget to fit fenders/mudguards.
    Agreed!
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
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  8. #8
    Punk Rock Lives Roughstuff's Avatar
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    I will be leaving on a 3 month tour of the east coast USA in about six weeks. Just bought my bike; panniers on the way. I recommend a couple things for rain gear. I have a COLUMBIA rain jacket. Make sure that it is extra large size so that the arms go all the way down below your wrists. It has a zipper which you can tighten up in cold weather; and snaps that you can use alternately to allow some ventilation. The bulky larger sizes allow air to flow in and out and keep you reasonably warm and dry.

    To prevent water from dripping down your neck I wear a dickie. You can put it under a T-shirt and be dry and cool at the same time. It helps to have a hood: you can out it up and under your helmet and it keeps you really warm when the worst weather of all--cold driven wet snow-- strikes.

    Gore-tex was not, is not, and never will be, worth the money. Gore-tex folks think the reason why you sweat under raingear is lack of ventilation; in fact, the problem is simply that you are generating sweat faster than it evaporates from bare skin. Even if you were riding bear-*** naked, you'd break a solid sweat on a big climb. And your stuff is gonna get wet as spray comes up from your wheels, passing cars, and such. You'd be better off concentrating on being comfortable as your stuff gets more and more, shall we say, funky. Carry a small candle and light it when you are in your tent those drippy nights, it does alot to improve your morale.

    I also carry a full set of raingear like the stuff your mom dressed you in on the way to kindergarten...that yellow stuff with silver lining on the inside. Its a bit bulky but FAR more tough than any gortex crapola ever dreamed of being. It stops rain COLD, you can use it as a drop cloth for your tent (TRY doing that with gore tex gear!) and its visible.

    roughstuff
    Last edited by Roughstuff; 04-14-02 at 10:33 AM.
    Electric car sales are on fire! :)

  9. #9
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    Thanks for your raingear thoughts. I agree with what you said. I've bought some light weight packable stuff. If I get wet, I'll be wearing polypro. so I'll be warm.

    When you're cycling the west coast, if you think you might end up near Cooperstown, NY, I'd be happy to put you up for a night or two. Let me know, and if so I'll let you know how to get in touch.

    Cheers,
    Roadrunner

  10. #10
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    Re: Tenting
    My advice would be to take (a relatively light) one as the extra weight is a small price to pay for the gain in freedom and sense of adventure. There will be plenty of forests to camp in and if not farmers will probably let you if you ask them nicely, often for free - therefore cost of trip also greatly reduced.

    I have toured with a tent in Germany, Austria, Hungary and Norway (very wet) and the sense of freedom/adventure and early mornings are excellent, you can go where you want without having to factor in a major town. If things get really bad you can always stay in a B+B anyway, but you can't camp without a tent.

  11. #11
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    I just purchased rain gear that is lightweight, ventilated, and CHEAP! As in $16.00.

    They are clear, with a butt flap, and a velcro fastener.

    Check it out at http//:www.sportsbasement.com

    Click on running & fitness, then women's outerwear. This is a unisex garment.

    Good Riding!
    Last edited by tallcliff; 04-19-02 at 04:07 AM.

  12. #12
    Punk Rock Lives Roughstuff's Avatar
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    I looked at the one you mentioned and it does appear ya got yourself a bargain. Good work.

    I usually do not buy clothing over the internet because the intangible aspects of 'fit' and 'comfort' are hard to measure unless you out it on. I have long arms. Looking at this jacket on the website I don't think I would like it. To me a rain jacket must have not only a zipper, but ALSO snaps by which it can be shut. You zip up tight when the rain is heavy, and use various combinations of the snaps when you can get away with it to increase ventilation. This also applies to the wrist bands..they appear to be rubberizzed and always tight. You might want them loose for ventilation if the rain slackens. Also it would be nice if it had a hood so that rain does not go down the back of your neck. In a heavy rainstorm it appears to me that you'd get soaked thru those body length side panels?

    But enough theory! Please tell us how it works when ya get it and weather (pun!) you think it was worth the money. I like the transparent raingear too..they can still see your cycling jersey underneath.

    roughstuff
    Electric car sales are on fire! :)

  13. #13
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    I would agree, Rough, that it's not a perfect choice, although, I'm not sure there is a perfect choice for biking raingear.

    Just some insurance--we try to stay out of the rain, but sometimes....

    What I do like about these is they will fold up to a really small pack, easily, and are very lightweight.

    I haven't had to use it yet...I'll let you know!

    Good Riding!
    Last edited by tallcliff; 04-26-02 at 05:42 AM.

  14. #14
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    I ended up buing some inexpensive, packable raingear from Performance. The jacket packed up inside it's own pocket then had a belt that snapped around the waist. Very easy to carry. Anyway, I just got back from cycling in Ireland for a week and it rained everyday...except the last one. The gear held up well, and I was very happy to have it, because I used it every day. Some days I was wearing it all day, others I was taking it on and off all day. Needless to say, one day I rode 60 miles in the rain. All the gear planning really paid off on this trip. I had minimal cloths, but they were the right ones. The only thing I missed taking was my neoprene overshoes. I ended up putting baggies in my shoes to keep the feet somewhat dry...only then they sweated! I meant to take Gortex socks...but forgot! Silly me! I won't forget them next time.

    Cheers all.

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