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  1. #1
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Roadie with a seatbag question

    OK I am a road cyclist who will most likely be doing a 2 day/1 night tour at the end of June.

    I have only done day rides and get by with my mini-seatbag which holds a spare tube, c02, tire irons, and patch kit.

    I will obviously need a larger container to carry the bare essentials for an overnight tour: change of clothes, non-cycling shoes (I imagine flip flops are lightest and most compact), a few toiletries, etc.

    I know some guys from my club have bought a "rack" that attaches to the seatpost and holds a decent size pack, 10+ pounds.

    That is what I am trying to avoid, for a couple of reasons:

    1. I am only going on this one overnight tour, probably not doing it again and I want to minimize cost/expense

    2. My Ti road bike has a CF post and I have heard that those seatpost racks don't mix well with CF posts.

    What I am looking for is a suggestion/recommendation on a large and inexpensive saddle bag to hold the essentials....is this possible?

    PS I mentioned this to my non-cyclist wife and she said I should just borrow my daughter's backpack from school to carry my things. She doesn't get it.

    Any suggestions welcome. Budget is 20-35 bucks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tom808's Avatar
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    For 20 - 35 bucks, maybe the backpack is the best method. If your willing to spend a bit more, I would recommend a Carradice saddlebag. You can get a pretty good price by ordering direct from UK, but since they are generally back ordered, you would likely not see it in June anyway. Some will claim that you have to have saddle loops to use these, but you can attach them to your rails in a pinch. An example is:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Ca...ag/5360042581/

    Have a good trip!

  3. #3
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom808 View Post
    For 20 - 35 bucks, maybe the backpack is the best method. If your willing to spend a bit more, I would recommend a Carradice saddlebag. You can get a pretty good price by ordering direct from UK, but since they are generally back ordered, you would likely not see it in June anyway. Some will claim that you have to have saddle loops to use these, but you can attach them to your rails in a pinch. An example is:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Ca...ag/5360042581/

    Have a good trip!
    Wow that looks like a good pack, but looks like you must attach it to a rack (which I don't have), looks too big to just hang from the saddle rails.

    Unless I am missing something....

  4. #4
    eternalvoyage
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    You could use a simple stuff sack or drybag. They come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. The ones that come with some of the inflatable mattresses, or the stuff sacks that come with small, single-person tents have a good shape. You can just strap it to the rails under your saddle.

    It might take a little tweaking and creativity, but you can make it work and make it look good.

    If everything is rolled neatly in something that will hold the shape, and then the whole rolled bundle is inserted into the stuffsack (like packing a small tent), it will look good and hold its shape.

    Then you could use a couple of the side-release buckles that come with some accessory straps (backpackers use these, and they are sold by companies like REI). Or you could use some other lashing system. Parachute cord (or something similar from REI, etc.) with trucker's hitches (aka power cinches) would work just fine, and -- like the side-release buckles -- would be make the whole thing easy to attach and detach.

  5. #5
    Senior Member zeppinger's Avatar
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    The fancy way to solve the problem: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show...k-small/20-131

    Why not just go with a really big handle bar bag? The carradice suggested earlier does not require a bag hanger but it will hold the bag at a better position. $20 is pretty low to get a decent piece of gear that is going to last and perform well.

  6. #6
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppinger View Post
    The fancy way to solve the problem: http://www.rivbike.com/products/show...k-small/20-131

    Why not just go with a really big handle bar bag? The carradice suggested earlier does not require a bag hanger but it will hold the bag at a better position. $20 is pretty low to get a decent piece of gear that is going to last and perform well.
    Handlebar bag?!? Maybe not a bad idea, for some reason I had the impression that these bags do not fit easily on classic drop bars, but I will look into this. I have never used one but since I need the amount of space that would fit in a shoebox (more or less) this may be the answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    Handlebar bag?!? Maybe not a bad idea, for some reason I had the impression that these bags do not fit easily on classic drop bars, but I will look into this. I have never used one but since I need the amount of space that would fit in a shoebox (more or less) this may be the answer.
    I didn't have any problems mounting a handlebar bag to my 42cm 3T Ergosum drop bars. My touring bike uses Shimano STI shifters and I didn't have clearance problems. Haven't mounted the bag since I switched to the 40cm bars, but I don't expect to have problems. If you put a lot of stuff in a handlebar bag, the bike's steering will feel pretty weird, though...

    For $20-35, you best bet is probably to buy a cheap duffel bag and attach it to your saddle with bungie cords. Or strap your daughter's backpack to a seatpost-mounted rack... and pack really light!Seriously, though: your carbon post will probably support quite a bit of weight, provided you don't crush it when attaching the rack. Just keep the weight as close to the post as possible. A change of clothes, flip-flops, and a tube of toothpaste shouldn't weigh too much.

  8. #8
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
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    I think a backpack may be the way to go. You're gonna get sweaty under the pack, and your lower back won't thank you, but you can put up with that for a weekend tour. You won't get a good handlebar bag in your budget, and you'll probably use the backpack again.

    Is there anyone in your club with a touring bike you could borrow?

    If this trip gives you the touring bug, you can get a trailer or whatever later on. There are also racks that put all the weight on the skewer and not on the frame.
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

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    Senior Member balto charlie's Avatar
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    Try webbing straps with a dry bag on the front handlebars. If you don't have a dry bag use a nylon bag with a plastic liner. That should be enough room. If not buy a mid-sized seat bag.
    Epicdesigns makes great(but expensive bags) Go look at the site to borrow designs for a handlebar bag. It is really easy to do.

  10. #10
    imi
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    Just one night? Do you really need a tent? change of clothes and shoes? If you KNOW it's going to be dry maybe just a sleeping bag and toothbrush would suffice?


    p.s some of us tourers are a smelly lot!

  11. #11
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips. I also cross-posted this question in the 41 (road), and here is my conclusion as of now:

    OK I slept on it and have made a tentative decision:

    Trying to stuff everything under my seat in a duffel is going to cause rubbing, so that is out.

    Buying new expensive fancy packs and/or racks for a one-time trip is not going to work, as I am a total cheapskate.

    I did consider using my daughter's small backpack (at my wife's suggestion), but I think it will not be comfortable on my shoulders...plus it says "HELLO KITTY" and I am traveling through rural Pennsylvania...

    So it seems the easiest and simplest method is to break down and use the ultimate freddy method...the fanny pack. I think I have a medium sized one in the back of the closet from the 1980's....between the current saddle wedge, jersey pockets, and the fanny pack I believe I can carry all my gear.

    Doug

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeppinger View Post
    Why not just go with a really big handle bar bag?
    Lots of weight in a handle bar bag isn't very pleasant.


    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    So it seems the easiest and simplest method is to break down and use the ultimate freddy method...the fanny pack. I think I have a medium sized one in the back of the closet from the 1980's....between the current saddle wedge, jersey pockets, and the fanny pack I believe I can carry all my gear.
    I was going to suggest a fanny pack. Using what you have is the best option.
    Shorts and a t-shirt and some flipflops (and toiletries) shouldn't need a very big one.
    Last edited by njkayaker; 06-03-10 at 09:33 AM.

  13. #13
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    Wow that looks like a good pack, but looks like you must attach it to a rack (which I don't have), looks too big to just hang from the saddle rails.

    Unless I am missing something....
    The Super C is BIG. For an overnight trip a Barley and a handlebar bag work really well.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Ca...ag/5360042583/

    Carradice saddlebags work best if you have a saddle with bag loops, ie a Brooks, but if you don't use one of those you can buy a fixture from Carradice that clamps to the saddle rails
    and give you bag loops and support for the bag

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Ca...rt/5360042588/

    or buy some simple screw on loops from Velo-orange.

    http://www.velo-orange.com/vivabagloops.html

    you really don't need a support for a saddlebag the size of the Barley.

  14. #14
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    wow those velo orange viva bag loops look like a fantastic idea....unless you have carbon rails on your saddle.
    I might just get them for my touring bike

    datlas... for 20-30 bucks looks like a fanny pack might be the best idea.


    I would go with a handlebar bag like this for around 10 bucks you can't loose. I've used handlebar bags for years and they don't mess with your handling too much
    Last edited by pawnii; 06-03-10 at 10:37 AM.

  15. #15
    But wait... I AM the man. NoGaBiker's Avatar
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    I know the OP has ruled out a seat-post rack and pack, but I gotta say, if the budget is a little bigger I can wholeheartedly recommend the Topeak MTX-EX or MTX-DX line of gear. They make a great seatpost rack that will hold 20 pounds (on an alloy post, of course), and then the trunks come in a standard model with side pockets, and a "P" model (EXP and DXP) that have zip-up panniers hanging off the sides of the trunk. A friend and I used the DXP models on our 15-pound titanium race bikes for a 400-mile tour around Provence last fall and they behaved impecably. Plenty of room for a nice set of street clothes (we ate at nice restaurants), tools, books, camera equipment, sketchbooks, jacket, etc. The bikes behaved nicely in all but the fiercest downhills and even then it's not that they misbehaved so much as they were not confidence inspiring at more than 35mph; felt light on the front.

    Outfitted with the rain covers they make a perfect solution for the racebike-owning credit-card tourist, all for about $150 or so.
    Stick it to the man.

  16. #16
    eternalvoyage
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    You can also strap a drybag or a stuff sack under the top tube.

    If done properly, you can strap to the saddle rails without problems -- many people have done it; it's done all the time.

    There are also bags with velcro straps that are designed to fit in the main triangle. I've tried them and they work great.

  17. #17
    This is Shangri La MTBMaven's Avatar
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    See my recent post here: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...1#post10895575 about an overnight trip I took a few years ago on my old carbon frame. I used a Carradace Nelson Longflap and bag man rack I got from Peter White. They had both in stock at the time and shipped overnight (last minute trip). Both items worked out great and I still use them regularly today.

    Another option if you are a real light packer might be this DIY project using a Minoura dual saddle bottle rack. http://www.socaltrailriders.org/foru...ack-sorts.html
    You could use either a slightly larger bag than I used and/or use two bags. Might suggest rigging a way to put either another strap under the bottom or some means of securing the bag so it doesn't slip out the bottom. I still have the thing but unfortunately only used it once. Shortly after I made it I got a new saddle that does not accept the Minoura rack. Though I could use it on my MTB now that I think about it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoGaBiker View Post
    Outfitted with the rain covers they make a perfect solution for the racebike-owning credit-card tourist, all for about $150 or so.
    If he was looking for a long term solution, this would make sense. For one night, it doesn't make sense. He should make do with what he has (and carry as little as possible).

  19. #19
    Senior Member datlas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    If he was looking for a long term solution, this would make sense. For one night, it doesn't make sense. He should make do with what he has (and carry as little as possible).
    Yes, that is my inclination.

    If I get bitten by the touring "bug" I would probably invest in a better long term solution. But this is very possibly a one-time situation.

    Thanks again for all the tips and suggestions, I have not fully made up my mind but fanny pack is the leading candidate.

    Doug

  20. #20
    eternalvoyage
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    If you want to try it at some point, you can also strap the fanny pack under the top tube.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by datlas View Post
    Yes, that is my inclination.
    It certainly would be easy to see how you like riding with the fanny pack.

  22. #22
    But wait... I AM the man. NoGaBiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njkayaker View Post
    If he was looking for a long term solution, this would make sense. For one night, it doesn't make sense. He should make do with what he has (and carry as little as possible).
    Hence my first sentence, where I acknowledge this advice is not suited to the OP.

    My intention was to chime in for any roadies, such as myself, who sometimes like to tour on our 15-pound race bikes rather than enjoying the "road-hugging-weight" of our 30+ pound LHTs. Topeak make a wonderful alternative. Adapting good race bikes for long distance touring is something even dedicated tourists with really good touring bikes like to do.
    Stick it to the man.

  23. #23
    Senior Member John Bailey's Avatar
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    There are a lot of cheap rear racks for under $20. Nashbar has one for $14 right now. Buy it, attach whatever you want to it for the trip.

    John

  24. #24
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    Option 2. Maybe ship your stuff to where you are going and ship it back the next day? That meets your budget and allows you to not stress over your jersey pockets being too full. Check post office website for priority mail options and box sizes. You might need to bring the backpack to carry the box to the post office the next morning to ship it home.

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