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  1. #1
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Which Hilleberg for bicycle touring?

    I'm curious to hear how you choose a tent for bicycle touring - particularly longer trips which may encounter a wide range of climate conditions (e.g. hot and humid in Virginia, all the way to possible snow and cold in Yellowstone etc). Do you favor lightweight over everything else, or do you prefer to have a bit of extra space at the expense of more weight?

    I ask because I have the opportunity to get a couple of Hilleberg tents on a pro-deal, and I'm finding it next to impossible to figure out which ones to go for. They all seem to have their strong points - the tunnels have great space to weight ratio, whereas the freestanding ones have the convenience of smaller footprint and ability to pitch anywhere (including inside a motel room, for example, which can be useful for drying out or even as a bug net).

    I'm thinking to get one tent for 2 person use, when I tour with my wife, and the second as a solo tent for when it's just me (or her). I'm 6' exactly, she's 5'3".

    I confess to a slight preference for freestanding. The Hilleberg catalog talks about these tents mostly in terms of static snow load ability, but I see other advantages over the tunnels: You can pitch anywhere, obviously, and on a smaller footprint, and you can also hang the tent upside down or from a tree or put it up in a motel room to dry it out. You can also use it inside a motel room as a mosquito net, or dry it out there too. On the other hand, the tunnels have a lot more space for less weight.

    I'm currently liking the Staika for couple use, because I do like side-by-side doors, and also two doors is always nice for cross-ventilation in hotter climates. It's a heavy tent, but a lot of positive features to justify that. Petra Hilleberg recommended this one when I said I wanted a tent that could "do it all" and also be reliable. She said that the heavier Kerlon 1800 fabric, YKK #10 zips and 10mm poles will last longer under the duress of long bicycle tours. The lighter weight Kerlon 1200 tents are fine, but obviously there's always a trade-off with weight and longevity.

    I'm also liking the idea of the Akto as the second solo tent, though the Soulo is tempting... the Akto has a slightly smaller interior and larger vestibule, but it's obviously not freestanding... but it is light, and that makes it very flexible for solo use. I'm thinking the combination of the Staika at one end of the spectrum (heavy, two person) and the Akto at the other end (light, solo) might make for the least overlap. But another part of me wonders if I should segment this by going for one of the freestanding tents, and one tunnel - so I can compare these two types for myself. Something like the Allak and Kaitum - similar weight, different concepts.

    The Kaitum seems a good option in terms of space/weight, and it has vertical end walls, so you can really utilize all the space, and with two doors it has excellent thru-draft potential. But it needs a lot of real estate. The Nallo seems to be well liked by many, though I've heard tales of broken poles there, and the sloping foot means your sleeping bag may touch the wall down there more easily, and the venting doesn't seem all that great (you can't adjust the foot vent from inside the tent). The Nammatj series look really nice (high vents, Kerlon 1800), but they are obviously heavier, and only one door. The freestanding Allak looks very solid, but it's a bit smaller than the Staika, and the Kerlon 1200 and zips won't be as long lasting. The Soulo has a smaller vestibule than the Akto, and it's heavier, though the freestanding aspect is attractive. The GT models of the tunnel tents all look awesome, with that huge vestibule. Great for getting your wet stuff off out of the rain before getting into the inner tent.

    Part of me wonders if it's really worth going for the heavier 1800 tents - maybe it's "too much tent" for this application? Though bicycle touring can be pretty hard on gear, especially longer trips. I won't be seeing arctic storms, but thicker material, thicker poles and beefier zips will just last longer in any conditions.

    There's all these conflicting thoughts going through my head, so I'm wondering if people can help me with what YOU see as most important in a bicycle touring tent. What criteria would you be using to decide here? I know it's personal, but I thought it might be interesting to compare approaches. It's a common problem with the Hillebergs, I think, because if you read their catalog then it looks like every one of those tents would be good for just about anything. I tend to get lost in the thought process, and I don't want to get (e.g.) a heavier tent that has all these awesome features (in theory) but then I find out on the road that weight really should have been my primary concern after all. So did you ever regret taking a slightly heavier tent that was otherwise wonderful, or do you feel that a couple of extra pounds is worthwhile if it's going to be your "home on the road"?

    For me, my camping style seems to be that I pretty much stop at the end of the day, put up the tent, make dinner, and then turn in and go to sleep. In the morning, I get up, have breakfast, and leave. I don't seem to hang around much in the tent itself, so I don't know if they bigger space would be very useful for me. On the other hand I had an MSR Hubba on my 2008 tour, and I found it a bit small. I also didn't feel very safe in that tent with some of the high winds I experienced, which is one reason I'm keen to get a tent that can stand up to rougher weather. I want my tent to feel a bit more secure, then I'm more likely to use it rather than dive into a motel at the slightest suggestion of bad weather. I think the Hillebergs will do that.

    I've also used an REI Half Dome Plus 2 (from 2003) which made me really appreciate the two door design and cross-draft that it encourages. And back in 1998 I was using an REI Sololite, which is similar in concept to the Nallo. It seemed ok then.

    Apologies for the long post, and thanks for any insights.

    Neil

  2. #2
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    Neil I'm a complete novice at this camping lark ,i joined the fell club of uk few years back ,great club and most if not all the lads in that club own hilleberg tent's and i think the move popular one is the nallo gt2 .all these guys a veteran tourers probably touring most of there life's so if they recommend the nallo gt2 it might just be worth having a good look at it .
    myself i have the akto i wanted a tent that was super easy to pitch stand up to bad weather a fairly comfortable it tick's all those boxes next time when i have the dosh I'll go for the nallo gt i think.
    anyway hope you pick the right one enjoy.

  3. #3
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Thanks! That's interesting. The thing that bugs me about the Nallo is the low vent at the foot. It seems that the slope of the tent will tend to impinge on the foot of your sleeping bag if you're not careful, and also the low vent cannot be adjusted from inside the tent. Can anyone who uses the Nallo confirm or refute this aspect?

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    Go with the Allak. I am planning to get one as soon as I get the funds together. I was planning on a Staika too, but wrote to Hilleberg to ask if they didn't make something lighter, because I already have a heavier expedition tent. I got a response from one of the Hilleberg family members (also Petra) telling me about the Allak and suggesting I go with that. It looks like the best of everything in a reasonably light super nice tent! As you said, there will be a trade off in weight to durability, but that is a just a fact of life. If you really want something that can do it all, you are looking and more weight than you would want to tour with - even divided between two.
    Last edited by Ciufalon; 06-20-10 at 05:38 PM. Reason: ?
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  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    I have the Nallo GT 2, while I cycle the world. It's small, light, and easy to setup with 4 pegs in a matter of 3 minutes if I move fast. I find that if I have my feet towards the sloped end in the morning I have condensation. If I sleep with my head on that end it is fine. I used to think I would touch the inside of the tent will rising but not the case. I've been happy with this tent, and it's certainly got enough storage room for when things get ugly.

    You cannot adjust any of the vents from inside the inner tent. You can adjust the front top vent from inside the vestibule. If you have the bottom vent open, it increases the chance for water to seep into the ground sheet for a soggy surprise in the morning.
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  7. #7
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleizure View Post
    You cannot adjust any of the vents from inside the inner tent. You can adjust the front top vent from inside the vestibule. If you have the bottom vent open, it increases the chance for water to seep into the ground sheet for a soggy surprise in the morning.
    Thanks. I know many people love the Nallo, but I just can't get past this design flaw (as I see it). Not being able to adjust the vents from inside the tent, when condensation is such a potential issue... that's a major thing to me. Particularly as the Hillebergs are true 4-season tents (i.e. the fly comes down all the way to the ground), so proper venting is really important. The Nammatj models are the heavier version of this design, with the rear vent higher up and adjustable from inside. But the Nammatj 2 GT also weighs 3.5 kg:

    http://www.hilleberg.com/2006%20Prod...jNammatjGT.htm

    I guess for me in the lightweight tunnel tents, the Kaitum looks good:

    http://www.hilleberg.com/2006%20Products/NewKaitum.htm

    It has the benefit of two doors (so great through draft potential), vertical end walls, two vestibules. I find myself wondering if the one big vestibule of the Nallo GT would be better than two smaller vestibules of the Kaitum. The Kaitum 2 is 20cm longer than the Nallo 2 GT, so roughly the same amount of real estate.

    This guy apparently used a Kaitum 2 solo on his GDMBR tour, and liked it a lot:

    http://www.trailspace.com/gear/hille.../review/15342/

    Thanks again,

    Neil

  8. #8
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ciufalon View Post
    Go with the Allak. I am planning to get one as soon as I get the funds together. I was planning on a Staika too, but wrote to Hilleberg to ask if they didn't make something lighter, because I already have a heavier expedition tent. I got a response from one of the Hilleberg family members (also Petra) telling me about the Allak and suggesting I go with that. It looks like the best of everything in a reasonably light super nice tent! As you said, there will be a trade off in weight to durability, but that is a just a fact of life. If you really want something that can do it all, you are looking and more weight than you would want to tour with - even divided between two.
    I agree - it's always a tradeoff. Weight, price, performance, pick any two (or something like that). I do like the look of the Allak, I'm tempted to just get that and the Staika, since I already know that I like the freestanding design. This would allow me to compare these two (very similar) tents directly to see which one we end up preferring in real use.

    Alternatively I could go the "One freestanding, one tunnel" route, so I can compare and contrast the differences between those styles. This could be the Staika (or Allak) and probably the Kaitum.

    Or, I could go "One two-person, one solo", which would probably entail Staika (or Allak) and the Akto.

    I don't have strong leanings toward any one of those approaches at the moment.

    Thanks again,

    Neil

  9. #9
    imi
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    I took my new "Soulo" on my winter tour in the SoCal deserts this year... worst storms there in 30 years I was told :/

    Quite simply the perfect tent for my one-man needs... room for all my gear in the vestibule (including a guitar)... an' solid as a rock - in high winds the few other tents I saw (mostly REI domes) were blowing all over the place whilst my Hilleberg was hardly even flapping.

    The roof is high enough to get dressed inside... perfect for when it was below freezing outside in the morning

    I have the footprint aswell which was great when it rained a lot - definitely worth it

    The "Allak" looks like a slightly larger version, better for two-man...

    IMG_0676..jpg
    Last edited by imi; 06-21-10 at 11:25 AM.

  10. #10
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Soulo looks very good too. Maybe that would be a better option than the Akto if I want a freestanding solo tent. I could see going either Staika/Soulo or Allak/Soulo. Perhaps Staika/Allak are too close together in terms of functional overlap (both are two person). I have heard that the Soulo is an extremely stable tent in high winds. The Akto has a larger vestibule but smaller interior, Soulo larger interior and smaller vestibule (though I have read comments from one person who purchased both the Akto and Soulo and ended up sending the Soulo back because it seemed smaller inside - I think it was the end walls on the Akto that gave more usable length than the Soulo). A nice aspect of the Soulo over the Akto is the full mesh inner door - the Akto only has half mesh.

    It's not clear how well the Soulo would vent in hot/humid conditions, though. Any experience of that yet?

    Do you think you can fit four average bicycle panniers (e.g. two Ortlieb front rollers + 2 rear rollers) in the Soulo vestibule, without blocking your door access too much?

    Thanks,

    Neil

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    I've just bought the Akto for a solo ride up the North Sea coastal route. I need something small and light but good enough to live in for several weeks. Ive tried it out once so far and it seems ideal.

  12. #12
    imi
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    Do you think you can fit four average bicycle panniers (e.g. two Ortlieb front rollers + 2 rear rollers) in the Soulo vestibule, without blocking your door access too much?
    Yes, I'm pretty sure this would be no problem... I put my guitar case and two 30/35 litre dry bags (and other bits and pieces) in the rear vestibule area without blocking the door area at all. The rear corner of the inner tent can even be unhooked to allow for even more vestibule space.

    Logically the two small panniers would go further back, the two big ones closest to the door as the vestibule is wedge shaped

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    I have heard that the Soulo is an extremely stable tent in high winds.
    This I can attest to... I followed the manufacturers advice to face the rear end to the wind, and was amazed how stable the tent is.

    Normally I go for most minimal, but chose Soulo over Akto as it was freestanding and for the extra roof height and space.
    Last edited by imi; 06-21-10 at 01:49 PM.

  13. #13
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Thanks again for the insights. I seem to keep going around in circles with this, probably because I would like these tents to fill a wide range of capabilities, and obviously the different models all have their strengths. The Akto is super light (relatively, for a Hilleberg). The Soulo is freestanding and strong. The Nallo is lightweight and roomy (especially the GT version). The Kaitum has good space, vertical end walls and awesome ventilation capabilities. The Allak is freestanding and lightweight. The Staika is heavy duty and freestanding. The Nammatj is a heavier duty and better venting Nallo. And so on and so forth. What do you value? That's what it comes down to.

    Part of me would really like to compare one of the freestanding tents, say the Allak or Staika, to one of the tunnels, e.g. Kaitum or Nammatj GT. But I think deep down I know that I really like freestanding tents. I'm just intrigued by the big space and low weight of the Nallo, Nammatj and Kaitum - and the GT vestibule looks pretty sweet....

    But I think I feel myself coming down on the side of the freestanding... for wilderness camping I think any of them would be great, but for a typical bicycle tour you end up in such a variety of situations that perhaps the freestanding design has a real advantage. You can easily pick it up and reposition, or shake it out upside down to empty out the dirt, or hang it to dry it out, or put it up in the motel room to dry. I also think I prefer the side-by-side entry, and two doors for cross-ventilation (important with the Hillebergs since the fly comes down to the ground).

    Also, of course, there's the fact that you aren't required to stake out a freestanding tent. I know people say that most of the time you have to stake it down anyway, to stop it turning into a great big kite, but in reality there have been plenty of situations where I had a very sheltered site where wind wasn't a problem at all. Oft times you seem to end up on concrete, sand, or wood platforms.

    People talk about how they always seem to be able to find a place to stake out a non-freestanding tent, and I believe them - but this talk reminds me of the people who don't like kickstands, and say that they always find a place to lean their bike. I know from experience that I prefer a good kickstand so I can stop and stand the bike anywhere. So I guess this is kind of similar - it comes down to your own perception of what's tolerable and how much work you're willing to do (or ignore). I like to be able to place my tent wherever I happen to find, without necessarily being constrained by having to find stakeout points. That's not a definitive statement, just a preference. I still might try out one of those tunnels, just to see for myself.

    I also feel that perhaps a solo tent might feel a bit too constrained during long trips on the road - people often talk about how you go two person for solo, three person for a couple, and so on. So all this starts to point to the Staika and Allak - very close in functionality, true, but I could compare the Kerlon 1200 and 1800 construction, and also the Allak could serve as a solo tent in a pinch (not a lightweight one, but a couple of pounds isn't all that much when compared to the total weight that is being carried on tour - including me, I could stand to lose maybe 30 lbs anyway). Your home on the road, I think, is worth a couple of extra pounds if if makes it more likely you'll use it and not be miserable or cramped. This is particularly valid on a bicycle, since you're not carrying the weight directly on your back. So for now I'm thinking Staika and Allak...

    At least, that's the current rationalizing. Could change, of course, tomorrow I'll probably look at that awesome vestibule on the Nallo 2 GT and get confused all over again. So it goes.

    Thanks again,

    Neil

  14. #14
    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    Neil- briefly,

    you might think the freestanding is where the benefit in a hilleberg lies- but its in the GT vestibule if you're a bicyclist.

    freestanding is overrated. tunnel tents are great and easy to alternate pitch.

    those vent issues may be valid, it is nicer to adjust from inside, but hands down the niftiest thing about hilleberg tents for bicycle tourists is the GT Vestibule.

    the bike garage from hilleberg. This is a defining feature you should choose your hilleberg tent around. I'd go with a nallo GT fer shure.
    Last edited by Bekologist; 06-22-10 at 08:26 AM.
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  15. #15
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bekologist View Post
    you might think the freestanding is where the benefit in a hilleberg lies- but its in the GT vestibule if you're a bicyclist.

    freestanding is overrated. tunnel tents are great and easy to alternate pitch.

    those vent issues may be valid, it is nicer to adjust from inside, but hands down the niftiest thing about hilleberg tents for bicycle tourists is the GT Vestibule.

    the bike garage from hilleberg. This is a defining feature you should choose your hilleberg tent around. I'd go with a nallo GT fer shure.
    Could you maybe explain in more detail what the GT vestibules are useful for? I don't think you can actually fit the bike(s) inside a Nallo 2 GT vestibule - my bike is about 70" long, and the Nallo GT vestibule is only 71". The bike would need to be laid down, since with the sloping sides of the tent I doubt it would fit standing up. So it would take up the entire inside of the vestibule, you'd need to step over it to get in and out of the tent. Not ideal, I'd probably just end up keeping the bike outside anyway.

    Or are you talking about other uses for the GT space? Specific examples would be very useful here. Cooking when it's wet? I can see the GT being good for when you need to enter the tent in the rain - you can get into the vestibule, close the outer door, take off your wet gear outside the inner tent and get inside without getting the bags wet. Kind of like an air lock, both doors don't have to be open at the same time. I did read one comment by Tipi Walter on his Staika that it can be an issue getting out of the tent in the rain, since you have to open both the inner door and the outer door at the same time - so rain can get inside then. But I think he solved this by simply not opening up the outer vestibule door all the way. That's one of those details that would be good to know about. Maybe seeing the tents in person would help figure all this out.

    Something I might end up doing, if Hilleberg is amenable, is simply ordering a number of these tents so I can see them at home, then keep the two that seem to speak to us when seen "in the flesh". But I'm not sure if they'd be up for that or not. Presumably the tents have to be resellable as "new", so that means I can't really put them up outside. Even inside would be a bit of an issue in our house, what with all the cat hair everywhere (I think I have hairballs). Maybe a trip to an empty gym would be useful then.

    Thanks again,

    Neil

  16. #16
    Senior Member jurjan's Avatar
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    We use a Nammatj 3 GT for the two of us.
    When I used to travel alone I had a Nammatj 2 GT.
    However, it got old and we both wanted a bit more space (the 2 GT is definitely usable with two persons), so we bought a 3 GT.
    They did change the model a bit during the years, and not all of it to my liking, but that could be the change from 2 to 3 persons.
    It still is a very nice tent. We use the vestibule for gear stowage (none of it remains on the bikes at night) and cooking if necessary.
    since I'm reasonably tall (1m93) I do like to sit in the vestibule as it gives me an extra few cm's of headroom.
    however, the innertent is just about high enough for me.
    It's NOT a freestanding tent, but then we're not rockclimbing or anything.
    I've never in my (oh dear) 40+ years of camping needed a freestanding tent.
    there where times when I would have liked to have one (like -15 C and trying to get about 40 pegs in (I had a one pole tent at the time)), but I was always able to find a usable spot.

    If you have any questions, please just ask.
    have a nice day,
    Jurjan

  17. #17
    Crazyguyonabike
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurjan View Post
    We use a Nammatj 3 GT for the two of us.
    When I used to travel alone I had a Nammatj 2 GT.
    ...
    If you have any questions, please just ask.
    I think the Nammatj is a really nice looking tent. Questions:

    o Do you find the slope at the foot of the tent is ever a problem in terms of the sleeping bag touching and becoming wet?
    o How does this tent do in warm conditions - does it ventilate well, or can it become a bit stifling if there's not much air movement? (Only one door, and both vents are high up).
    o Why did you get this one over the lighter Nallo? Was it because of the Kerlon 1800 being more robust, or was it the other design differences (e.g. vents).
    o Is the no-seeum mesh on the outer vents useful in practice to keep mosquitoes and bugs out of the vestibule area?
    o Is the full mesh door on the vestibule useful?
    o How do you dry the tent out in the morning? (Turning a freestanding tent upside down is useful for drying the underside, for example, while still keeping the inner parts open and airing too. Also you can put the tent up inside a motel to dry out better).
    o What do you do when you come across a tent pad or other type of solid platform or hard, rocky ground where you can't stake?
    o Any other differences which sealed the deal for you?

    I guess just a rundown of what features made you choose this over the other Hillebergs would be great. Also, to lend some context, what you think is more important - size, weight, function etc.

    Someone else raised a point about a tunnel being more constrained with respect to orienation - you might have to have it lined up in a certain way, but this might not be good for keeping an eye on the bikes. With a freestander like the Staika, you can orient the tent to have the doors pointing any direction.

    Sorry for all the questions, I just think this is a really interesting choice, and I'm trying to understand better how the proponents of tunnel tents deal with these "issues". I might yet end up trying out one of the Nallo or Nammatj GT tents, or the Kaitum. Especially if Hilleberg lets me buy a few, planning to return all but two... it could make for an interesting photo article, having them all set up side by side in a gym.

    Thanks again,

    Neil

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    I have an Unna and it rocks. It's only a 'solo' tent, although it will fit 2 people. Very sturdy, easy-setup/takedown. For a strict 2-person tent, I'd go with an Allak or Nallo2 if I were you.

  19. #19
    Senior Member jurjan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    I think the Nammatj is a really nice looking tent. Questions:

    o Do you find the slope at the foot of the tent is ever a problem in terms of the sleeping bag touching and becoming wet?
    Occasionally it does get wet(ish) down there, we've never had it more than damp, I think it depends on lots of factors.
    I always attributed it more to the fact that it's slightly colder at the footend of the sleeping bag than to touching.
    Fact is that you first touch the innertent, only after that do you even touch the outer.
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o How does this tent do in warm conditions - does it ventilate well, or can it become a bit stifling if there's not much air movement? (Only one door, and both vents are high up).
    When it's warm and with little wind ALL tents feel a bit stifling.
    When there's a bit of wind it gets better.
    If you want to you can get the ends of the outer off the ground, giving extra ventilation.
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o Why did you get this one over the lighter Nallo? Was it because of the Kerlon 1800 being more robust, or was it the other design differences (e.g. vents).
    mmmhh a combination, I like robust, and i like the same size poles of the nammatj.
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o Is the no-seeum mesh on the outer vents useful in practice to keep mosquitoes and bugs out of the vestibule area?
    In our opinion: yes, but see next question
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o Is the full mesh door on the vestibule useful?
    again: yes, but: for it to work properly you need the rest of the tent against the ground (see ventilation) (otherwise the bugs get in the other way)
    plus when possible (weather and location permitting) you can use this door the provide more ventilation than the fabric door, though still less then just leaving the door open (but then bugs can enter...)
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o How do you dry the tent out in the morning? (Turning a freestanding tent upside down is useful for drying the underside, for example, while still keeping the inner parts open and airing too. Also you can put the tent up inside a motel to dry out better).
    We don't...
    We shake it, then pack it. In the afternoon we pitch it.
    I've never dried a tent before packing it when traveling, if we end up at a hotel or something we just hang it in the bathroom, or on the bed (but mostly that just a few days each holiday).
    If we remember it. We just dry it out really thoroughly once we are back home
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o What do you do when you come across a tent pad or other type of solid platform or hard, rocky ground where you can't stake?
    I've never encountered a campsite where there's a tent pad (I think it's USA only?). For hard, rocky ground we just use harder pegs.
    If no other possibility we would use the guyropes and muddle on.
    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    o Any other differences which sealed the deal for you?
    I've personally never been a lover of the shape of cupola tents, I'm oldschool, the prettiest tent I've ever had was an Erdman Schmid Mier Thermo.
    One pole, more than 40 pegs (if i remember correctly). plus it needed flat ground and lots of it.
    For me the best compromise at the moment (and has been for years, I'm still waiting for the next revolution in tentdesign) is a tunnel.

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    I guess just a rundown of what features made you choose this over the other Hillebergs would be great. Also, to lend some context, what you think is more important - size, weight, function etc.
    I / we tend to camp in the afternoon, so we tend to spend some time in / around the tent each day, that alone is quite different from your intended use.
    so: size is important, weight less so.

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    Someone else raised a point about a tunnel being more constrained with respect to orienation - you might have to have it lined up in a certain way, but this might not be good for keeping an eye on the bikes. With a freestander like the Staika, you can orient the tent to have the doors pointing any direction.
    That is correct, however, I don't see my bike when sleeping either. I like visiting the nearby village, not necessarily taking the bike, tend to leave the bike just locked near the tent.

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    Sorry for all the questions, I just think this is a really interesting choice, and I'm trying to understand better how the proponents of tunnel tents deal with these "issues". I might yet end up trying out one of the Nallo or Nammatj GT tents, or the Kaitum. Especially if Hilleberg lets me buy a few, planning to return all but two... it could make for an interesting photo article, having them all set up side by side in a gym.
    mmhh, yes it would.
    especially if you get the red fabric option (which we did).

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    Thanks again,

    Neil
    You're welcome (LOL!)
    have a nice day,
    Jurjan

  20. #20
    imi
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    The pegs I got with my Hilleberg are amazing... thin goldish yellow... smash em with rocks into stony ground... not a bend!

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    Senior Member jurjan's Avatar
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    and you forget: light (because they're hollow)
    have a nice day,
    Jurjan

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    I chose a Nallo 3GT for our big trip, and it was brilliant. We kept all of our panniers, clothes and kit in the vestibule at night, and the bikes outside, locked to each other and attached by a piece of dark-coloured string to a helmet in the vestibule. We had acres of space inside at night! It was very cold most nights, so my experience probably wouldn't be useful in your deliberations about venting. On a couple of nights we had to pitch the tent in quite soft sand, but there were plenty of big rocks around to place on top of the pegs to maintain the tent's structure. We didn't bother drying the tent before re-packing in the morning.

    Great pegs too!

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    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    Neil,


    I'm a pretty strong tunnel tents proponents, have used them extensively since buying an iconic north face westwind tunnel tent in the 1980s....one I replaced a few years ago with an updated version. light, simple, strong in a storm.

    tunnel tents you can hang up to dry, you can move around in campsites (just drag it, gear and all - use your ground sheet) or just grabbed at the tops of the hoops like a big handbasket and carried. strong, very very rarely do you need to alternate pitch them using cords or whatnot, but in calm conditions even a water bottle or some gear tucked in the corner can keep a tunnel tent up.

    Tunnel tents have traditionally been lightest space:weight (although the new modified single pole designs are good)

    last i checked, lightweight tunnel tents are still part of approved emergency sledge gear by the british antarctic service.

    easy to pitch in a real howler. hoops in on the ground, then stake one side, lift and it stands itself up in the gale.

    I'm not intimate with Hilleberg but thought any of the GT vestibules would take a bike, maybe just the nammatj GT version lets you park the bikes comfortably in there. I suspect Renata would answer that with a quick phone call.


    otherwise, they're just one of hundreds of well built tents on the market today. but heavy for freestanding, as they are true double wall tents for true four season use. i usually avoid any tents that weigh over six pounds but for one with a bike garage i'd make an exception.

    a cyclotourist in august in missouri doesn't need a four season tent. but that bike garage is cool!
    Last edited by Bekologist; 06-22-10 at 08:39 AM.
    "Evidence, anecdote and methodology all support planning for roadway bike traffic."

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    Senior Member jurjan's Avatar
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    Bekologist: I don't think my bike would fit, never thought about it, but my gut says my bike's higher than the 1.05m that even the nammatj 3 gt is.
    plus: the door is significantly lower than the max. height.

    if needed / wanted I can probably dig up a picture of bikes and tent close together so you can get a feel for the relative sizes.
    Last edited by jurjan; 06-22-10 at 08:35 AM. Reason: perhaps dig up picture if asked for
    have a nice day,
    Jurjan

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    totally louche Bekologist's Avatar
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    hmm, ive seen pics with bikes inside the hilleberg tents. there's one at their website.

    that makes me rethink the viability of this, maybe Neil needs to do some product testing!
    Last edited by Bekologist; 06-22-10 at 08:55 AM.
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