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Old 06-23-10, 10:47 AM   #1
Trentski
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Suggestions for upgrading 1995 Cannondale T700?

I have a 1995 Cannondale T700. Rode it loyally for 5 years then (sadly) let it sit. Decided to fix it up and use it for local rides and light touring (e.g. 2 day MS events, 4 day tours).

What tires would you suggest?
What equipment would you upgrade?

(original bike specs @ http://sanaandterry.com/cannondale/year/1995/1995.pdf pg 37 & 58)

Thanks
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Old 06-24-10, 01:27 PM   #2
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Tires: Schwalbe Marathons

Other equipment: Maybe a front rack? I like Tubus or Jandd.

It looks like a nice bike. Take it touring; that's what it was designed for. It will be happy.
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Old 06-24-10, 03:29 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trentski View Post
I have a 1995 Cannondale T700. Rode it loyally for 5 years then (sadly) let it sit. Decided to fix it up and use it for local rides and light touring (e.g. 2 day MS events, 4 day tours).

What tires would you suggest?
What equipment would you upgrade?

(original bike specs @ http://sanaandterry.com/cannondale/year/1995/1995.pdf pg 37 & 58)

Thanks
The low gear is high for a touring bike. 7 speed cassettes are cheap. They don't have the best gear combination but they work. Get some clipless pedals too. Otherwise ride it.
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Old 06-25-10, 10:39 AM   #4
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Looks like a solid touring frame. Touring hasn't changed in the past 15 years and Cannondale touring bikes are and were very nice. It's more than enough bike for the type touring you're looking to do. I preach 1/2 step gearing especially on touring rigs and would say that if I had to change up anything on the bike itself, I'd ensure that it was set that way. When doing light touring, or supported touring like you're talking about, you don't need much, so a Cannondale handlebar bag would be top of the list. If you want to carry enough for medium to small panniers, I like to run lowriders and leave the rear rack open unless I'm running large panniers. For tires, I only run Continentals. They are the best I've ever run in all types of weather and are especially good on wet rain soaked pavement. I get about 3500 miles from a rear tire. I also run an aero bar for comfort on long runs. Oh, fenders are especially nice. I run SKS (ESGE) narrow fenders on my main bike with 1 1/4" (28mm) tires.
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Old 06-25-10, 10:43 AM   #5
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The low gear is high for a touring bike. 7 speed cassettes are cheap. They don't have the best gear combination but they work. Get some clipless pedals too. Otherwise ride it.
22 front / 28 rear isn't high.. But like I said, I'd set it up for 1/2 step.
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Old 06-25-10, 11:34 AM   #6
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22 front / 28 rear isn't high.. But like I said, I'd set it up for 1/2 step.
Not as low as it could be either. Half step plus granny only works if the middle and outer ring are closer together than a 42/32. I've tried half step and came away very unimpressed. Too many double shifts that I never could figure out how to make. I always seemed to be in the wrong gear..either too high or too low. There are other problems with trying to make a half step today. No cassette is made that would work. You could probably make one but you'd have to buy several cassettes to get the gears you need. The costs, along with the chainwheels you'd need, are a bit prohibitive.
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Old 06-25-10, 12:49 PM   #7
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Well, you're right. You have to set up your gearing properly which I've done and helped do for dozens of bikes. I does take getting used to and I can dbl shift in my sleep, while snoring in the rain at night with headwinds. While it's a arguably a bad habit to get into and it could take some time to master, it sets you up with a true 15, 18 or 21 gear bike. I've custom built my freewheels for years. Mostly the bikes today are set up with so many gears that you never know where you're set and many folks don't want to shift the front chainring for some reason.. I guess I equate today's drivetrains to automatics. You don't have to think about it. In this case he could go with the following, while not perfect it gives you 14 distict gears with favorable 1/2 step and the triple gives you 5 more distinct gears:

42/36/22 with 11/12/13/16/20/26/34

Don't get too hung up on that "plus granny" or "plus alpine"; it just means a very distinct lower set of gearing on the third chainring which doesn't figure into the 1/2 step part.
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Old 06-25-10, 01:02 PM   #8
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I never did understand the almost micro drive that they began coming out with on these touring rigs. The smaller the chainrings and cogs, the more wear and the faster you have to replace them. On my Bridgestone I've gone through 3 sets of chainrings (and they need it again) That averages just over 15,000 per set. At that rate the 42/36 would wear out 16% faster as would the 11 and 12 tooth cassette cogs.
Must be a freakin' Shimano marketing ploy. I hate Shimano.
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Old 06-28-10, 09:24 AM   #9
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Thanks for responses!

Thanks to all who have responded.

If anyone reading the thread needed a primer on "half-step" the following link was very helpful for me: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ha-i.html

- Dave
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Old 06-29-10, 12:05 PM   #10
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I'd just like to add to that article in stating that I find that with a 6 speed freewheel especially, I like to have the half-step setup so that the drive train is both flexible and smooth. Most folks that have tried it and dismissed it were not in the saddle for days on end or learned that dbl shifts are easy. Whereas Sheldon states that a 1/2 step is usually meant for fairly even terrain and for close ratio chainrings, I have found that the most perfect 1/2 step drive train is a 50/44 with a 13-34 6speed freewheel. I don't find that I spin out on the top end and I find the bottom end pretty accomodating to even good ascents. If you're running a 5 speed freewheel the same applies, but you would just remove the 13 tooth sprocket (14-34). The "plus granny" or "plus alpine" stated above gives you the extended range for hills/mountains just as a normal triple would. But you do not have to use it on most terrains. The 44 frt with 34 rr should and does give you pretty good low gearing.. Dave and and all - happy trails to you
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