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  1. #1
    Senior Member RaiderInBlue47's Avatar
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    Quick solution for day trips?

    So I'm going on a day trip with a friend of mine through the boonier parts of middle tennessee. I'm not packing much, just a meal, some extra water, my phone and some emergency stuff like some of those tire scabs.

    Has anyone ever ridden with a sackpack on? Thoughts?



    I think it'd be a lot more portable than a backpack of any sort and you can wear it messenger style or backpack style.

    Any other ideas? I don't have any panniers or bags made for a bike yet. :\ The only other idea I have is the backpack I use for school, but it's a bit bulky.

  2. #2
    Senior Member zeppinger's Avatar
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    If you have to wear something on your back it should be something with padding on the inside. Because your back will be slightly bent all the weight of everything in the bag will be laying on top of your back and making contact with the bony bits of your spine. When you hit a bump, pot hole, or if you just rock back and forth a little the contents of the bag are going to make your life pretty unpleasant. Imagine a water bottle or corner of a book thumping against your curved spine for a few hours.

    If you want to go cheap and dont want to invest in a rack and panniers I would suggest a regular school bag that has a padded backing to it. If you have a small hiking type bag laying around that has some sort of waist or chest strap thats even better because it will keep the bag from swaying back and forth or changing your balance as much.

    Just my opinion though...

  3. #3
    coasterbrakelockup lz4005's Avatar
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    If you have a couple of extra toe straps you could probably secure a small bag like that to your bars or seat rails. Make it as compact and tight as you can without damaging the contents so it doesn't sway much as you ride.
    Ride lots, have fun, skid often!

  4. #4
    17yrold in 64yrold body
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    You might check out a hydration pack sized for your use. They already have padding, with a channel down the center to clear your spine. Many have waist and chest straps to keep them in place while cycling. They come in sizes fron 2L to 3L and a lot of different pack capacity sizing.

  5. #5
    Eater of Food WillJL's Avatar
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    I don't like to ride with a backpack on for anything more than a couple of miles because if makes me sweat like a pig.

    Furthermore, the sackpack you've shown looks particularly inappropriate for riding (or any other physical activity besides walking from your car to the gym) because the straps are strings, and they are going to dig into your shoulders and hurt you, even with a light load.

    I imagine you're suggesting this because you aren't particularly interested in purchasing any one of the many readily available products that are meant to attach to your bike to carry stuff, so I won't bother to suggest that you go out and buy anything. Maybe you have a couple of these better options lying around your house though:

    A fanny pack: no shoulder straps or large surface area to make your back sweat in the Tennessee summer heat. Plus you'll have some freedom of movement.

    A light, normal backpack: this would be worlds better than the string sack that you posted.

    Would it be out of your budget to get yourself a bottle cage to carry your water?
    Instead of carrying your tools, phone, and puncture kit in the backpack or fannypack or whatever, could you strap them or tape them under your saddle somehow like lz4005 suggested.

    All things considered, maybe you should just bite the bullet and buy an appropriate product, like a handlebar bag.

    Good luck.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    If you're anticipating multiple day trips, do yourself a big favor and get a handle bar bag. Or, a large fanny pack.

    http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Tender...ref=pd_sbs_a_1

    http://www.amazon.com/High-Sierra-En...outThisProduct
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  7. #7
    It's true, man.
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    Give it a try and see how it does. It's cheap enough that failure wouldn't be costly, but if it works for you it could save you a bundle over more spendy options. I've used one to shuttle some groceries a few miles to camp with no ill results.

  8. #8
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    I have an under armour sackpack that I carry things in occasionally and if the gym wasn't only a mile away I would buy something better beacuse its really uncomfortable and annoying.

  9. #9
    Isaias NoRacer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RaiderInBlue47 View Post
    So I'm going on a day trip with a friend of mine through the boonier parts of middle tennessee. I'm not packing much, just a meal, some extra water, my phone and some emergency stuff like some of those tire scabs.

    Has anyone ever ridden with a sackpack on? Thoughts?



    I think it'd be a lot more portable than a backpack of any sort and you can wear it messenger style or backpack style.

    Any other ideas? I don't have any panniers or bags made for a bike yet. :\ The only other idea I have is the backpack I use for school, but it's a bit bulky.

    I was given one of those for free from Bike2Work Day. The last time I used it was during this 110 mile ride and the next day for 110 mile ride back:

    http://bimactive.com/ba/journal/post/10783/34115
    2009 mileage = 14,738 miles; 2010 mileage = 15,234 miles; 2011 mileage = 17,344 miles; 2012 mileage = 11,414 miles; 2013 = 12,169

  10. #10
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    I agree that if you want to use some sort of back pack a real back pack or a hydration pack that has extra room to store the items that you want to carry. I use a handlebar bag or a trunk bag on my rides.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  11. #11
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    Another option is to buy a rear rack (you can pick a cheap one up for $5-15, depending on sales or if you have somewhere to buy used) and bungee strap on a bag. I personally would not ride with anything besides a shirt on my back all day- Last night, riding 3 miles with a backpack on made me sweat enough. As someone else mentioned, a handlebar bag would also be an option (and could prevent you from needing to purchase a water bottle and holder as well, since the water would be in easy reach).

  12. #12
    Senior Member Ruffinit's Avatar
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    I like the Cannondale handlebar bag for light fast touring. I don't like things on my back when riding, even camelbaks and they stay fairly secure.
    K.I.S.S.

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  13. #13
    Senior Member RaiderInBlue47's Avatar
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    Well, went against the wind and tried the sackpack today. Rode about 40 miles through the beastly hills in the boonies of middle tennessee.

    Worked out pretty well, surprisingly! At first I put both straps together and slung them over, messenger bag style. This proved somewhat comfortable and worked okay until I started to climb or pedal hard. The bag would shimmy off of my back and on my side, getting in the way. After a while I gave up and wore it backpack style. Perfect! Mine rides low on my back (surprising for a 6'2'' guy) but it worked out really well. My only caveat is that you can't have anything jagged or too heavy. My pack was about 5 pounds (extra water bottle, sunglasses, keys, wallet, snack, scabs, and some band aids). If you got to 10 it'd get a bit cumbersome.

    Granted, a rear rack and a small bag would be best but this is a great solution for under $10-$20. I rode through some serious hills and it was upper 80s/lower 90s today. If you're touring for the weekend and are on a budget, it works pretty well.

  14. #14
    It's true, man.
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    I suspected it might. I imagine it's one of those things that'll be just fine in 90% of conditions on a short ride day.

    It'll probably only become an annoyance when your day's ride sees complications and becomes an epic slog or a death march - all minor discomforts are magnifies and become intolerable when that happens. Keep things easy-breezy and it'll work great.

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