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Old 08-01-10, 11:59 AM   #1
tomn
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Tom's New Touring Bike

Hi All,

I wanted to show off my new touring bike:



Hopefully this will link you to more pictures:

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/cli...7624505281671/

Tom
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Old 08-01-10, 12:10 PM   #2
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double wow really beautiful bike,but i would loose the front rack in favour of tubus duo sorry i had to say that but a great looking bike be careful it's not nicked.what other gear have you on it groopset/ bars /wheels.
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Old 08-01-10, 12:30 PM   #3
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Very nice bicycle where did you get that one?The fenders are nice looking on that setup.You are going to have a great time touring on that I think.Enjoy it I know you will.The racks are a good way to go I think it helps with the look my self.
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Old 08-01-10, 12:36 PM   #4
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Very nice bike. You're gonna be real upset when you trash the paint job when riding on gravel, though.

Is that a generator hub up front, or just something absurdly beefy?
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Old 08-01-10, 01:47 PM   #5
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Hi All,

I have to stick up for my platform front rack, that's where my tent goes! It is way heavy though. As for the bike; I made the frame. I have been a framebuilder for quite a while, and have a frame shop in my basement. Not a bad thing. I picked flat black for the powder coat job because you can fix nicks and scratches with a can of flat black spray paint. Shiny paint is really hard to touch up. I already got to put that to use after dropping a wrench on the top tube. Most of the parts are coming off of my old bike. A quick run down:

- 40 hole 145mm Phil Wood symmetrical tandem rear hub, 36 hole Hugi tandem front hub, with triple butted spokes, Sun Rhyno Lite rims, and Swalbe Supreme tires. Accidentally the spoke length ended up being the same for both sides of both wheel.

- Phil Wood bottom bracket, 90's era M900 XTR 24, 36, 48 crankset, 12-34 cassette, rapid rise read derailleur.

- Bar-end friction shifters, V-Brakes

- Nitto Noodle bar, sewn on elk hide bar cover w/gel pad underneath.

I'll add some pictures when I get the bar bag and aero bars on. Thanks for letting me show it off.
Tom
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Old 08-01-10, 01:55 PM   #6
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Very nice, thanks for sharing.

Nothing like having a frame shop in the basement.
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Old 08-01-10, 02:47 PM   #7
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A bike made for an experienced rider. I like it. It would be nice to have dialogue with Tomn to get a feel for how to set up my Trek. Blues Frog.

Last edited by Blues Frog; 08-02-10 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 08-01-10, 04:07 PM   #8
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tomn be totally honest does it ride as good as it look's.class bike another rude question what money are you talking to build a bike like that.
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Old 08-01-10, 04:54 PM   #9
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Gorgeous bike. I assume that is your last name on the down tube; nice font.
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Old 08-01-10, 05:04 PM   #10
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Okay, but now you have to make a frame out of aluminum tubes and elastic that folds up into your pocket.
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Old 08-01-10, 05:29 PM   #11
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Very pretty bike, are those S&S couplers? Is that a Nitto front rack? I agree, it's nice to have a platform front rack. Even if you don't use it normally, it's nice to have a little extra room for groceries, etc.
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Old 08-01-10, 08:55 PM   #12
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Very nice thing you have, beautifully build.
How's that steerer tube lock works?
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Old 08-01-10, 09:16 PM   #13
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How's that steerer tube lock work?
I spend way too much time solving problems I don't really have. This is the part that is threaded into the head tube boss:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...ber=1173Pmode=

It plunges into a hole in the steer tube when rotated which locks the front wheel in place. I thought it would be handy when loading panniers, and other times that I cursed wheel flop.

Tom
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Old 08-01-10, 09:26 PM   #14
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Hi All,

It is my name on the down tube. I added the s&s couplers because my September tour starts in Bloomington Il, and I didn't want to take the 48 hr Amtrak ride again. It is a Nitto front rack that I got from Rivendell. I haven't added up the $$ for building the frame. I may be afraid to. The s&s couplers are the single most pricey thing on the frame.

Tom
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Old 08-02-10, 03:54 AM   #15
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I'm considering the sewn-on leather for handlebars. Have you used them before, and, if so, how do you like them? Any pros or cons?

John
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Old 08-02-10, 06:22 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomn View Post
I spend way too much time solving problems I don't really have. This is the part that is threaded into the head tube boss:

http://www1.mscdirect.com/CGI/NNSRIT...ber=1173Pmode=

It plunges into a hole in the steer tube when rotated which locks the front wheel in place. I thought it would be handy when loading panniers, and other times that I cursed wheel flop.

Tom
Good call, wheel flop is the bane of my existence. With a heavy Surly nice rack on the front of my bike and a large Jandd handlebar bag, my wheel seems to be able to get up to about 30mph on it's short journey from center to the point where the rack contacts my shifter barrels.
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Old 08-02-10, 08:57 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by John Bailey View Post
I'm considering the sewn-on leather for handlebars. Have you used them before, and, if so, how do you like them? Any pros or cons?
Hi John,

I used sewn-on elk hide on my last bike, from VeloOrange. It was looking a little shabby after three years, but was still in good condition. It has a little cushion to it, and it feels good. A lot like grabbing onto an elk. It takes about two hours to put on. Ending the job if you have bar-end shifters is a little disharmonious. I took to whipping over the end with hemp and shellac. I do like the look of it.

Tom

Last edited by tomn; 08-02-10 at 09:14 AM. Reason: I found out how to spell "shellac"!
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Old 08-02-10, 10:31 AM   #18
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very nice. I dig the headtube lock. Have you tried making racks? It seems that if you can build a frame, you could build the rack we all seem to want... A lightweight midrider/platform combo in silver tubular steel...

beautiful job though.
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Old 08-02-10, 01:43 PM   #19
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Hi John,

I used sewn-on elk hide on my last bike, from VeloOrange. It was looking a little shabby after three years, but was still in good condition. It has a little cushion to it, and it feels good. A lot like grabbing onto an elk. It takes about two hours to put on. Ending the job if you have bar-end shifters is a little disharmonious. I took to whipping over the end with hemp and shellac. I do like the look of it.

Tom
Tom, did you put the same VO on this new bike? I thought I read on the VO site that gel-pads wouldn't fit under their leather handlebar wraps.

Also, since we're supposed to take care not to let our leather seats get wet, is it the same for the bars?

Thanks,

John
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Old 08-03-10, 08:53 AM   #20
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Hi John,

I did use VO bar wrap again. I put the thinner Specialized gel pad on, and it does fit. You can tell where the edge of the pad starts on the top. That didn't bother me as I have aero bars that sit on top of that space. The leather survives rain because you treat it with neatsfoot oil.

Tom
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Old 08-03-10, 09:48 AM   #21
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Hi John,

I did use VO bar wrap again. I put the thinner Specialized gel pad on, and it does fit. You can tell where the edge of the pad starts on the top. That didn't bother me as I have aero bars that sit on top of that space. The leather survives rain because you treat it with neatsfoot oil.

Tom
Thanks Tom,

By the way, I forgot to mention -- that's one sweet ride you've got there.

John
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