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  1. #3051
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    IMG585.jpg

    This is my first attempt to build a 2-3 day bike. I have enough battery power in my custom charger to run the gps and lights for 48 hours. I have a bag full of tools, 2 spare tubes, chain master link, chain breaker, and patch kit. I have a bag at the end large enough for a change of clothes and supplies. I carry food and water in a small hiking frame pack. Still
    being tested but the ladt two 200km runs have been impressive. Time for a longer test. Total weight with the battery 16kg. Not bad.

  2. #3052
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    IMG585.jpg

    This is my first attempt to build a 2-3 day bike. I have enough battery power in my custom charger to run the gps and lights for 48 hours. I have a bag full of tools, 2 spare tubes, chain master link, chain breaker, and patch kit. I have a bag at the end large enough for a change of clothes and supplies. I carry food and water in a small hiking frame pack. Still
    being tested but the ladt two 200km runs have been impressive. Time for a longer test. Total weight with the battery 16kg. Not bad.

  3. #3053
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    Quote Originally Posted by krobinson103 View Post
    IMG585.jpg

    This is my first attempt to build a 2-3 day bike. I have enough battery power in my custom charger to run the gps and lights for 48 hours. I have a bag full of tools, 2 spare tubes, chain master link, chain breaker, and patch kit. I have a bag at the end large enough for a change of clothes and supplies. I carry food and water in a small hiking frame pack. Still
    being tested but the ladt two 200km runs have been impressive. Time for a longer test. Total weight with the battery 16kg. Not bad.
    Pretty compact and no doubt about it light and a nice stead. Unusual rim colour not something I have ever seen before is that a custom made set krobinson?

  4. #3054
    Senior Member Wheelmonkey's Avatar
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    IMG_0172_2.jpg
    This is my loaded bike which I've just begun to do some short touring with. This sustains me for 2 - 3 days/nights. I'm loving it! I'm sure I could get it lighter though. Right now the bike and load combined are around 51 lbs. BTW, I've been camping so this gear includes a tent, sleeping pad, sleeping bag, etc. If stayed at hotels I'm sure I could get MUCH lighter, but I rather enjoy the camping aspect.

  5. #3055
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  6. #3056
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    Wheelmonkey is that a carbon frame? If it is carbon have you had any issues using a carbon frame as a touring bike?

    crashmo I like the look of your setup it's got that older style about it.

  7. #3057
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ritterview View Post
    This is my fully-loaded rig just before setting off for the 2013 Spring Credit Card Tour. Day 1, Day 2 a b, Day 3.



    The idea with this tour is to make it like a group training ride, only carrying the bare minimum (sandals, running shorts, lightweight shirt) to hang out in and around a motel after 90 miles or so. The shorts and shirt are in an Eagle Creek Pack-It™ Compression Sac, sandwiched between the Adidas slides, which are strung underneath the saddle bag.
    Any info on the seat and tube bag set up. I really like the idea of simplicity. Do you feel your able to cover more ground traveling this light?

  8. #3058
    Tandem Vincitur Ritterview's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cntryislandboy View Post
    Any info on the seat and tube bag set up. I really like the idea of simplicity. Do you feel your able to cover more ground traveling this light?
    I posted some info and pics on FB about this, here and here. Take a look at that to see if it helps answer your question. Yes, we were able to cover more ground, just like a group training ride.

  9. #3059
    Senior Member Wheelmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BohicaX View Post
    Wheelmonkey is that a carbon frame? If it is carbon have you had any issues using a carbon frame as a touring bike?
    Aluminum frame with front carbon fork. No, I didn't have any issues with it, but I'm relatively new to this. Handled really well in the mountains.

  10. #3060
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelmonkey View Post
    Aluminum frame with front carbon fork. No, I didn't have any issues with it, but I'm relatively new to this. Handled really well in the mountains.
    Ah ok your bike just looked like it had a carbon frame and I was wondering what your impression was using a carbon framed bike for touring. I just haven't met anyone using carbon so I was just looking for some experienced first hand thoughts.

  11. #3061
    Senior Member mdilthey's Avatar
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    A lot of extreme distance records were done on carbon bikes. They're just fine for touring, although they last a few years less than Steel due to impact weakening the fibers.

    You can realistically tour on anything, though.
    Writing, Working, Photographing, and Living from the saddle. MaxTheCyclist.wordpress.com

  12. #3062
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
    A lot of extreme distance records were done on carbon bikes. They're just fine for touring, although they last a few years less than Steel due to impact weakening the fibers.

    You can realistically tour on anything, though.
    mdilthey thanks I figured you could tour on them but wasn't sure how much you might have to baby sit a carbon bike. I tend not to take much notice of professionals and there comments due to the fact that if they have frame issues it's replaced at no cost to them or you don't hear of how often frames get damaged for what ever reason. Touring can be rough on equipment and in my neck of the woods issues with carbon would be the end of a tour for me because no way of fixing but there is always a welder to use.

  13. #3063
    Senior Member mdilthey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BohicaX View Post
    mdilthey thanks I figured you could tour on them but wasn't sure how much you might have to baby sit a carbon bike. I tend not to take much notice of professionals and there comments due to the fact that if they have frame issues it's replaced at no cost to them or you don't hear of how often frames get damaged for what ever reason. Touring can be rough on equipment and in my neck of the woods issues with carbon would be the end of a tour for me because no way of fixing but there is always a welder to use.
    Carbon Fiber is stronger than steel and aluminum, but if you do break it, you can't weld it. Additionally, on the microscopic level, road vibration, jarring, and pocking from kicked up rocks will break fibers. You won't be able to see the damage, but the bike will slowly weaken over time.

    For most tourists, steel is the way to go, but carbon fiber definitely isn't wrong. What good is a bike if you don't ride it? Carbon bikes have the same 10-year lifespan of most bikes, although steel occasionally goes much longer when cared for. But nothing is perfect.
    Writing, Working, Photographing, and Living from the saddle. MaxTheCyclist.wordpress.com

  14. #3064
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    Thanks for the info mate that has filled a big knowledge void for me.

  15. #3065
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdilthey View Post
    Carbon bikes have the same 10-year lifespan of most bikes, although steel occasionally goes much longer when cared for. But nothing is perfect.
    Cant speak for carbon, but saying that most bikes have a lifespan of 10 years is certainly not representative of the bikes I have owned. Parts wear out, but with reasonable care and "normal" use (no crashes etc) bikes ridden like mine with maybe 2-3000 km per year are just fine after 10 years of use. Im talking the frame, other stuff wears out and gets replaced.

  16. #3066
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    Cant speak for carbon, but saying that most bikes have a lifespan of 10 years is certainly not representative of the bikes I have owned. Parts wear out, but with reasonable care and "normal" use (no crashes etc) bikes ridden like mine with maybe 2-3000 km per year are just fine after 10 years of use. Im talking the frame, other stuff wears out and gets replaced.
    You're doing it wrong. ;->
    ...

  17. #3067
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    what can I say, I try and try but dont usually do more than 5000km per season. I do ride two bikes regularly so it gets split between them, although the bike that usually gets ridden more is ye ol alu framed mtn bike, and its 15 yrs old, it keeps on doing The Timex thing for my commuting et al.

  18. #3068
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    Here's the bike in its unloaded, commuting form

    and here it is on a recent tour through Georgia and Alabama.

    here's the velospace profile for it.
    http://velospace.org/node/46785

  19. #3069
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmikesell View Post

    here's the velospace profile for it.
    http://velospace.org/node/46785
    Is that one of those "This bike is a pipe bomb" stickers? I'd be leery about having that on there. Unfortunately these days many people are paranoid weenies:

    On March 2, 2006 at 5:30 am an Ohio University police officer spotted a bicycle attached to the Oasis restaurant bearing a promotional sticker for the band. The officer saw the words, "This Bike Is a Pipe Bomb" and became concerned. The area was cordoned off, and part of the campus was closed for several hours. The bicycle was subsequently destroyed by the Athens bomb squad despite assurances from the bike's owner that it was just a sticker. The owner, a graduate student, was initially charged with inducing panic, a misdemeanor. However, the charges were dropped a few days later. Later the student was awarded money for the damages to his bicycle. [2][3]

    A similar incident occurred in 2001, when a police officer spotted and detained a woman at an Austin, Texas peace rally. Her bicycle was also labeled with the band's sticker. The woman was released after the band's existence was confirmed.[4]

    On March 14, 2006 Bellarmine Hall at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia, PA was evacuated because of another bicycle with the band's name painted on it. No charges were filed.[5]

    On February 16, 2009, Terminal C at Memphis International Airport was evacuated because of a bicycle with the band's sticker on it. A pilot notified police when he saw the bike, with the band's sticker on it, parked outside of the terminal. Police evacuated the terminal and sent in K9 units; however, no explosive materials were found. Police arrested the owner of the bike but let the owner go a few hours later because he had not committed a crime.[6][7] After hearing about the incident, the band's lead singer urged fans to use caution when they applied the stickers.
    - wikipedia


    I've been toying with setting up my girlfriends tourer with a low-rider rack like that and another rack mounted higher like you did. How do you like it?
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  20. #3070
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BohicaX View Post
    The honking cassette as you describe it lol... (I had a good chuckle at that) is made for mountain work but on the other end of the scale I can sit on a comfortable 35-40km per hour hauling that rig without spinning out so for me that is comfortable riding. To try and pick it up it's heavy no doubt about it but surprisingly it rolls pretty darn good with little effort once you do get it rolling. I must admit though I'm on the other end of the scale when it comes to touring I'm not a credit card tourer nor do I rely on anyone to get me out of trouble as I carry everything both for survival and spare parts I'm truly self supported. I take responsibility for my own actions so I do my up most to ensure I don't rely on others or risk other life's because of my own desire to be adventurous.

    I go as far as carrying two spare rims among many other spares I carry they do break and if it wasn't for carrying spare rims I couldn't have fixed this problem hundreds of kilometres from nowhere in the outback.



    Part of the adventure this is my home and I pedal it if you see me crossing the USA stop and have a chat with me I will give you the time of day.




    Amazing bike! As you say, not for everyone, but my hat is off to you.

    Might I ask about the 11-41 cassette? Did you make that yourself?

    Also, what is a "bog rapper"?
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 07-07-13 at 01:50 AM. Reason: ETA: bog rapper
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  21. #3071
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    Is that one of those "This bike is a pipe bomb" stickers? I'd be leery about having that on there. Unfortunately these days many people are paranoid weenies:




    I've been toying with setting up my girlfriends tourer with a low-rider rack like that and another rack mounted higher like you did. How do you like it?
    the funny thing is, the frame came used with the sticker, and I happen to really like the band already. I lock this bike up around my university and i've never had an issue.

    I really like the setup I have. Carrying the weight up front makes the ride surprisingly nimble, and a randonneur bag is just plain useful.

  22. #3072
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    Quote Originally Posted by Medic Zero View Post
    Amazing bike! As you say, not for everyone, but my hat is off to you.

    Might I ask about the 11-41 cassette? Did you make that yourself?

    Also, what is a "bog rapper"?
    Hi MZ thanks it's a bike built and suited for me and my needs only I'm done with touring on a shoe string of gear I now like to tour in comfort but while still roughing it if you know what I mean...

    No I didn't make the cassette I purchased the single 41T from the below link,

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/41-Tooth-...item3cd2ee3c1f

    I use a Shimano XT M770 9 Speed MTB Cassette 11-34 and a Shimano Deore HG61 9 Speed MTB Cassette 12-36. On the Deore HG61 I grind the pins tabs to release the individual sprockets only using the 36T one. Using that sprocket allows for a smoother gear change to the 41T as there is no ramps on that dinner plate. From the link below I purchased those spacers to allow for making the single 9 speed cassette from all the parts.

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Mountain-...item3ccc69402f

    Depending on your rear wheel hub you might need those spacers so the dinner plate doesn't rub on your hub. Not only that but the spacers that comes with that 41T sprocket I think isn't enough to get the correct spacing in my case and I suspect others would have similar issues. Also to make sure that your locking ring can torque the cassette you may find you need the extra spacers to make for a good fit.

    Using all those parts as I did you need to do some MacGyver work to the 36T cassette sprockets to make the 41T fit and have the correct spacing so it doesn't warp under torque from the locking ring. Those 5 nuts you see on the 41T sprocket are to rest on the next sprocket so before assembly you need to rotate the both the 41T and 36T on the splines to find the perfect fit. It's a little work involved and more work involved to get your derailleur set-up to clear the sprocket with the B screw as that screw will need to be pulled out and replaced with a 4mm x 25mm bolt to get the travel needed. BTW if anyone wants to do this I'm using a XT 9 speed Shadow derailleur and when all the little fixes are done it works without fault and is smooth. It's the only derailleur I have used this system on so I can't offer any other experience to how well it works on other set-ups but on my gear I chose not an issue.

    Gauging my your wink I see I made a typo in "bog wrapper" and for those that don't know what bog wrapper is it's to clean one's self after taking a dump commonly know as toilet paper.

    Hope that helps you out MZ on the 41T sprocket.

  23. #3073
    Senior Member Nick The Beard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmikesell View Post
    the funny thing is, the frame came used with the sticker, and I happen to really like the band already. I lock this bike up around my university and i've never had an issue.

    I really like the setup I have. Carrying the weight up front makes the ride surprisingly nimble, and a randonneur bag is just plain useful.
    Really fun band live too.
    http://instagram.com/nickandbruce

  24. #3074
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidmikesell View Post
    the funny thing is, the frame came used with the sticker, and I happen to really like the band already. I lock this bike up around my university and i've never had an issue.

    I really like the setup I have. Carrying the weight up front makes the ride surprisingly nimble, and a randonneur bag is just plain useful.
    Thanks! Is that a Tubus Tara? What model is the other rack?
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

  25. #3075
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BohicaX View Post
    Hi MZ thanks it's a bike built and suited for me and my needs only I'm done with touring on a shoe string of gear I now like to tour in comfort but while still roughing it if you know what I mean...

    No I didn't make the cassette I purchased the single 41T from the below link,

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/41-Tooth-...item3cd2ee3c1f

    I use a Shimano XT M770 9 Speed MTB Cassette 11-34 and a Shimano Deore HG61 9 Speed MTB Cassette 12-36. On the Deore HG61 I grind the pins tabs to release the individual sprockets only using the 36T one. Using that sprocket allows for a smoother gear change to the 41T as there is no ramps on that dinner plate. From the link below I purchased those spacers to allow for making the single 9 speed cassette from all the parts.

    http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Mountain-...item3ccc69402f

    Depending on your rear wheel hub you might need those spacers so the dinner plate doesn't rub on your hub. Not only that but the spacers that comes with that 41T sprocket I think isn't enough to get the correct spacing in my case and I suspect others would have similar issues. Also to make sure that your locking ring can torque the cassette you may find you need the extra spacers to make for a good fit.

    Using all those parts as I did you need to do some MacGyver work to the 36T cassette sprockets to make the 41T fit and have the correct spacing so it doesn't warp under torque from the locking ring. Those 5 nuts you see on the 41T sprocket are to rest on the next sprocket so before assembly you need to rotate the both the 41T and 36T on the splines to find the perfect fit. It's a little work involved and more work involved to get your derailleur set-up to clear the sprocket with the B screw as that screw will need to be pulled out and replaced with a 4mm x 25mm bolt to get the travel needed. BTW if anyone wants to do this I'm using a XT 9 speed Shadow derailleur and when all the little fixes are done it works without fault and is smooth. It's the only derailleur I have used this system on so I can't offer any other experience to how well it works on other set-ups but on my gear I chose not an issue.

    Gauging my your wink I see I made a typo in "bog wrapper" and for those that don't know what bog wrapper is it's to clean one's self after taking a dump commonly know as toilet paper.

    Hope that helps you out MZ on the 41T sprocket.
    Thanks for the info on how to make the 41 toother. Have you had any problems with freehub body failure? Seems like a lot of torque.

    The wink was actually because the Aussie version of English is largely a mystery to us Americans and I really had no idea what you meant! Since there was a typo, googling didn't help either!
    ISO: 22" GT Rebound frame, year 2000 model

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