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Old 11-14-10, 10:54 PM   #1
pgjackson
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Camera bags

I am new to biking and consider myself a decent photographer. I'd like to combine the two, but I'm not sure how I should carry my DSLR camera. Any suggestions? Backpack, frontpack, mounted saddlebag...? It would be nice to have it ready to take pictures at any moment vice having to pull over, take it out then put it back.
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Old 11-15-10, 12:14 AM   #2
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handlebar bag
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Old 11-15-10, 04:44 AM   #3
MichaelW
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Bar bag with a decent quick-release, locking mount (Klickfix make the mounts) such as Ortleib, Carradice etc.
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Old 11-15-10, 08:37 AM   #4
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I keep my not-quite-a-DSLR camera in my Carradice handlebar bag. Its inside a padded camera bag inside the Carradice. Works great.
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Old 11-15-10, 08:45 AM   #5
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I keep my Nikon DSLR in an Ortlieb handlebar bag with the optional camera padded insert. Works great.
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Old 11-15-10, 11:39 AM   #6
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Ortlieb also makes a Tele-Zoom camera bag , you would wear that ,

4 point chest harness holds it right in front of you.
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Old 11-16-10, 02:13 AM   #7
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I've started combining photography and cycling this year myself. My solution for my camera (Canon 400D) was a Lowepro bag. Nova 160 AW model. It has flat loops on the back where one could strap it to something though it's a bit big to slide it onto a belt and walk around with it on your hip. The extra pockets are perfect for cellphone or whatever other little items you want to carry as well as purpose made slots for batteries and memory cards. This model bag is perfect for my camera and a 70-300 mm lens. It also comes with a rain cover though I've not tested it yet. When I want to walk around away from my bike, it unclips in seconds and I sling it over my shoulder and go with all my important items right there.

Of course, my ride is a bit unconventional. A Trice QNT '06 which is a recumbent trike. So, this solution was perfect for me since I don't have handlebars to use a handlebar bag. The with extra clips, the camera bag fastens right onto the straps of the seat's side pod bags and hangs straight. It sits right at my elbow and I can pull the camera out quick enough I managed to catch a shot of a pair of deer racing across a field. Not a GOOD picture, but I still managed to catch 'em before they made the trees.

With the strapping on the back, you might be able to figure out a quick release way to fasten it to your handlebars for moving away from the bike for a better angle.
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Old 11-16-10, 08:12 AM   #8
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Keeping the camera in the front is the best way I have figured out. Once you get to that point you will likely be choosing from the variety of handlbar bags availible. I ended up liking the Hobo style of bags and stuff smaller canera bags into it:


GF1 with 14-45 and case inside my Acorn bag by rperks1, on Flickr

The next hurdle you will face is the self realization of how big and heavy the conventional DSLR gear is. This has led me down the path of the micro 4 3 format over the last year and a half. I am getting the results and flexibility of the DSLR format with half or less of the package size. I still have my canon and some of the kit has sentemental value, otherwise I would have sold it by now.

Once you have gone that far you may start to look at you needs and a camera like the Panasonic DMC-LX5 and notice that it will meet 90% of you needs and is barely bigger than a pack of note cards. Even with a camera that small I would still be keeping it in the pocket of the Hobo bag.
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Old 11-16-10, 08:26 AM   #9
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I concur with the above, handlebar bag will be the most convenient.

I also second rperk's use of Micro Four Thirds and similar mirrorless cameras. They are small and light, and if you're printing 8x10s or smaller the image quality will be the same as your DSLR. High-end point and shoots will also be very good up to that size, though I'd treat it more as a backup than a primary camera.
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Old 11-16-10, 12:07 PM   #10
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Do we need a few general photography threads. They usually crop up as a result of "what camera do I take" .
I figure three should do the job.
1. Photography: kit
2. Photography: techniques
3. Photography: admin and management

1 is for all the stuff you might want to take or leave, reviews of particularly fine (and available) kit.
2 is for your actual picture taking tips relevant to cycle touring*
3 is for file management, power management, care, cleaning, storage, security, insurance, travel tips, extreme environments etc.

If we need to include photos to illustrate techniques, could they be as small as possible. Extra large photos seem to expand the text to fit, making it harder to read all the other entries on the page.

* Solo touring pics, including the bike, pics from a moving bike, panoramics, wildlife, whatever...

Whaddyaallthinkofthis.
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Old 11-16-10, 02:04 PM   #11
pgjackson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rperks View Post
Keeping the camera in the front is the best way I have figured out. Once you get to that point you will likely be choosing from the variety of handlbar bags availible. I ended up liking the Hobo style of bags and stuff smaller canera bags into it:


GF1 with 14-45 and case inside my Acorn bag by rperks1, on Flickr

The next hurdle you will face is the self realization of how big and heavy the conventional DSLR gear is. This has led me down the path of the micro 4 3 format over the last year and a half. I am getting the results and flexibility of the DSLR format with half or less of the package size. I still have my canon and some of the kit has sentemental value, otherwise I would have sold it by now.

Once you have gone that far you may start to look at you needs and a camera like the Panasonic DMC-LX5 and notice that it will meet 90% of you needs and is barely bigger than a pack of note cards. Even with a camera that small I would still be keeping it in the pocket of the Hobo bag.
I like this bag. The camera I have is a micro 4/3, Panasonic G1.
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