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  1. #1
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    A good petrol (gasoline) stove, any suggestions?

    Hi,
    I have been looking for a while at getting a stove, and have seen that a petrol stove may suit the best as I am planning to catch a plane to France (Montpellier) and then cycle home so I obviously will not be able to take a gas canister with my and it may be hard to find one once there. I am open to any suggestions for a stove really but have read that they are quite good and the fuel is everywhere! Are there any suggestion as to a good stove or where I could get one from? Also I a on a budget so would prefer a cheaper one
    Also I have seen the Coleman Dual Fuel 533 for about £50, any thoughts?
    Thanks,
    Last edited by 03staylo; 05-07-11 at 04:02 AM.

  2. #2
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    Gas cartridge stoves are made in France (Bleuet), so the easiest option would be to buy one with a cartridge or two when you get to France. Cheaper than the upfront cost of a good petrol stove, too.

    Alcohol stoves like the Trangia are another option, you can buy denatured alcohol in supermarkets or hardware stores.

    Petrol stoves usually run best on white gas (Coleman fuel), you can run them on auto fuel but they are more likely to soot up your pots and pans. Also, not all petrol stations will let you fill a camping fuel bottle from their pumps, you have to fill an auto fuel tank or an approved fuel container, which is usually a good bit larger than would be practical to carry on a bicycle.

  3. #3
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    I am in the USA so I do not have local knowledge of what is available. Other than that, I am quite happy with the Primus Omni-Fuel stove and the Optimus Nova stove. The Nova recently had a recall due to some parts problems out of china so they might not have replenished stock in the stores yet. But I would not hold the recall against them and would buy another Nova. Both will operate on kerosene and on Coleman fuel.

    But as noted above, you might be better off buying a canister stove when you get to your starting point. Liquid fuels stoves are more cost effective for those that burn a lot of fuel. If you are buying the stove for one trip, a canister stove and several canisters costs less.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
    But as noted above, you might be better off buying a canister stove when you get to your starting point. Liquid fuels stoves are more cost effective for those that burn a lot of fuel. If you are buying the stove for one trip, a canister stove and several canisters costs less.
    The problem that I am facing is that I would have no idea where to get the canister, I speak little french and do not really want to be going round a city looking for places to buy fuel. Also if I run out or need another cartridge in the middle of no-where, it will be harder to find a replacement than petrol, that is what I have been thinking.

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    i live next to France, its not a problem to find gas bottles (or stoves) there, its just that they are incompatible with the US/Coleman kind
    i should say its still possible to find ones that you can screw on (the Coleman kind), its just a lot harder

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by 03staylo View Post
    The problem that I am facing is that I would have no idea where to get the canister, I speak little french and do not really want to be going round a city looking for places to buy fuel. Also if I run out or need another cartridge in the middle of no-where, it will be harder to find a replacement than petrol, that is what I have been thinking.
    just go to any local fishing store
    alternatively, in France the biggest 'outdoor' shops are called Decathlon, you find them in just about every major city
    these are big stores, you are sure to find a stove there
    here's the one in Montpellier: http://maps.google.be/maps?hl=nl&bav...ed=0CDMQnwIwAQ


    edit: also, France/Europe is nothing like the US/Canada, although we have some more remote places (Alps, Pyrenees,..) its never really 'the middle of nowhere'
    i reckon you will pass more than a couple of villages every day
    Last edited by wiiiim; 05-07-11 at 06:30 AM.

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    When I was in southern France, it was just about impossible to find white gas, although strangely enough the camping stores sold white gas stoves. Most stoves use cannisters. That being said, if you want a good petrol burning stove, the MSR Whisperlite and Whistperlite Internationale are pretty much the standard.

  8. #8
    just another gosling Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
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    I use a Svea 123. It's easy to get gas, just use the hose at a gas station, the stove or fuel bottle being on the ground. There's usually a little fuel trapped in the bend in the hose. The last time I flew with my stove, I had it taken away from me at the airport on the US end. They want you to only take a new stove, never used. Bizarre. Has to be empty, in any case. The stoves with separate gas bottles will be easier to get onto a plane. Gas bottles empty and washed out.

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    MSR Dragonfly ,+, you can actually cook with it,
    simmer .. with needle valve on the burner head.

    I run mine off unleaded Auto , a few P at a fill-up..
    stow the bottle under my down tube.. in that bottle cage mount.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-07-11 at 11:01 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    MSR Dragonfly ,+, you can actually cook with it,
    simmer .. with needle valve on the burner head.

    I run mine off unleaded Auto , a few P at a fill-up..
    stow the bottle under my down tube.. in that bottle cage mount.

    Also a fan of the Dragonfly, I've run the it on diesel (need to change jets to do this) at a couple of remote construction sites I've had to work at. The nice thing about it is how easy it is to control the flame when cooking.

    Only real problem with it is that the fold is a little awkward, and I've noticed people on the internet complaining about the plastic pump being fragile. Personally, from my experiences with it, anyone breaking the pump either had a defective one, or is way rougher with their gear than I am.

  11. #11
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    What Carbonfiberboy said about taking liquid fuel stoves on airplanes is true, airline security people get very nervous about anything that smells like gasoline/petrol. Different airlines have different rules, and the people at the check in counter like to make up there own rules. If you burn auto fuel in a liquid fuel stove it will be very hard to get rid of the smell of the fuel.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by markf View Post
    If you burn auto fuel in a liquid fuel stove it will be very hard to get rid of the smell of the fuel.
    Flush some dawn soap/ water, and then a little vinegar through it and it'll get rid of the smell pretty quick.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by markf View Post
    Petrol stoves usually run best on white gas (Coleman fuel), you can run them on auto fuel but they are more likely to soot up your pots and pans.
    Agree. I used diesel in my XGK while traveling through Africa. Despite only using the stove a handful of times, the pots were covered in soot by the end of the trip. Don't think I ever managed to get them clean...

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    These are the camping stoves (réchaud de camping) at Decathlon stores.
    They are usually huge out-of town warehouse style stores

  15. #15
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
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    I have a Coleman 442 (from 1992) and an MSR Whisperlite International. They both run off unleaded so I can gas up at a gas station and not have to find Coleman fuel. They have both performed great. The Coleman still works fine after all these years and LOTS of use, and I've never done a thing to it. Both stoves get very hot very fast. Neither simmers great, but they do simmer. They are both a little stinky and sooty. I think the ability to use unleaded trumps the rest.

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