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  1. #1
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    Pedals for touring?

    Hello everyone,

    I am getting ready for my first touring trip. i am wondering what kind of pedals do you use for your trips? Right now I have clipless pedals on my Randonee. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
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    You can pretty much use whatever you like.

    I happen to prefer the type that is clipless on one side and platform on the other. It makes it a little easier to run errands or go out to dinner wearing normal shoes after the day's ride.

  3. #3
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    I use the same as Bacciagalupe - clipless/platform combos on a '09 Randonee. They're a little harder to 'find' than normal clipless pedals, but given how infrequent unclipping is during the long haul, the flexibility around camp is wonderful.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Multi purpose pedals are fine for someone being introduced to the clipless system. I don't see them to be any advantage to the touring cyclist who is use to a dedicated clipless system.

    As clipless is the most effecient pedal system, stick with them, and carry a light pair of off bike shoes. Lots seem to prefer Crocs.

    If you would rather simplify things, go with grippy platforms and low quarter trail shoes. That's what I use. But I'm slow and don't like fiddle factor.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  5. #5
    the bike made me do it oneredstar's Avatar
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    I use a well-go platform with straps.

    http://www.bicyclesmile.com/reviews/...-pedal-straps/

  6. #6
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    If you would rather simplify things, go with grippy platforms and low quarter trail shoes. That's what I use. But I'm slow and don't like fiddle factor.
    +1 , thats what I use as well

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    In the past I used a pedal that took SPD cleats on both sides, but in the future I plan to use Shimano M324 pedals that take cleats on one side and platform on the other. This will allow me to use non-cycling shoes on rainy days and cycling shoes on dry days.

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Winwood 'Decksters' are aluminum, you bolt on a spare cleat,
    and it turns any double sided 'spud' pedal
    into a platform pedal, of sorts, on 1 side..

    you could get a piece of aluminum deck plate and do similar..

    steel deckplate is used in the engine rooms of many ships.. to walk on.
    same surface texture.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe View Post
    You can pretty much use whatever you like.

    I happen to prefer the type that is clipless on one side and platform on the other. It makes it a little easier to run errands or go out to dinner wearing normal shoes after the day's ride.
    Although I use Egg Beaters from Crank Bros. (the Candy model with small platforms) and like them, I think the above suggestion is the way to go. I'm familiar with the Shimano pedals that have real platforms on one side but there may be others. Even if you only wear clipless shoes on a tour, you probably will use your bike at home and at some time it might be handy to just go off in a pair of gym shoes.

  10. #10
    Senior Member clasher's Avatar
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    I ride BMX pedals with keen sandals, (they also make the keens I wear as SPD shoes) I get hotspots when I ride my SPD shoes so I don't take them with me on any rides over 100K now and wouldn't likely ride them on tour. I'd recommend mountain shoes if you want clipless that way you don't need to pack extra shoes... one less thing to worry about. I like my keen sandals when it's raining too... wet socks bother me.

  11. #11
    Senior Member marmot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
    Multi purpose pedals are fine for someone being introduced to the clipless system. I don't see them to be any advantage to the touring cyclist who is use to a dedicated clipless system...
    I don't see why you have to be a beginner to appreciate pedals that let you wear efficient, comfy, easy-walking MTB shoes when it's nice out, but let you switch to river sandals when it's hot or rainy, winter boots when it's cold, or street shoes for short commutes. If you like simplicity, there's your answer. You can settle for plain platforms, or put up with racing-style clipless systems, but you don't have to.

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