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Old 06-11-11, 03:40 AM   #1
electrizer
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Straight pull and other hubs (long trip)

Hi All!

Im looking to doing quite a long journey (London - Poland) on my Spec Sirrus. I just want to make sure that nothing fails me on the way there.

Recently I saw a couple of bikes with different types of hubs, they were kind of bulky with protracting spoke slots. I found out that they're called straight pull hubs. Are they in any way superior to traditional hubs? I have Mavic A719's 36 spokes each. Are there any other things it is recommendable I should look into before setting out to make sure Im fully prepared?

Best!
Przemek

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Old 06-11-11, 05:56 AM   #2
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I am quite happy with my A719 rims on steel axle XT hubs, but the newer Shimano XT hubs are aluminum axles. Make sure that your spokes are as good as your hubs and rims. Mine are laced three cross front and rear. I am unfamiliar with the hubs you are discussing.
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Old 06-11-11, 07:20 AM   #3
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Hi All!

Im looking to doing quite a long journey (London - Poland) on my Spec Sirrus. I just want to make sure that nothing fails me on the way there.

Recently I saw a couple of bikes with different types of hubs, they were kind of bulky with protracting spoke slots. I found out that they're called straight pull hubs. Are they in any way superior to traditional hubs? I have Mavic A719's 36 spokes each. Are there any other things it is recommendable I should look into before setting out to make sure Im fully prepared?

Best!
Przemek
The straight-spoke hubs use much fewer spokes than 36, don't they?? You are better off with more spokes.

The A719's on crossed-spoked hubs are pretty standard for good touring wheels. I'd find something else to worry about!
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Old 06-11-11, 08:16 AM   #4
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London to Poland , via Copenhagen, perhaps?
theres a ferry to a port just east of the German Border.
[not going to attempt the spelling from memory]

I expect the customer service has improved since '91.
it had a soviet feel to it then .. got you from A to B, and that was all.
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Old 06-11-11, 09:03 AM   #5
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Recently I saw a couple of bikes with different types of hubs, they were kind of bulky with protracting spoke slots. I found out that they're called straight pull hubs.
It almost sounds like you're describing Crank Brothers Cobalt wheels, which feature a short, straight-pull spoke connected to a spine that they bill as an "elongated alloy nipple".

Regardless, the thing to remember is that J-bend replacement spokes are usually easy to find while straight-pull replacement spokes can be more difficult. For a long tour, I'd want a hub that used the more common J-bend spokes. If your wheels are built correctly, J-bend spokes should be plenty reliable.
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Old 06-11-11, 09:47 AM   #6
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Any particular spoke model and type you'd recommend?
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Old 06-11-11, 04:58 PM   #7
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Any double- or triple-butted spoke should work. I used DT Swiss Competition spokes and brass nipples when I build wheels for my touring bike. DT Swiss' triple-butted Alpine 3 spoke is supposed to be very durable, but they're twice the price of the Competition...
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Old 06-11-11, 09:02 PM   #8
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You have a rugged set of wheels.
For insurance you could put new spokes on the drive side of the rear wheel, the ones most likely to break, and
cannot be replaced without removing the cassette.
Bring extra spokes too. The front uses the same length on both sides, the rear uses different lengths on each side. Anything but the drive side can easily be replaced on the road.
Bring one of those spoke keys that fit many different sized nipples.
Also bring a couple of kevlar emergency spokes.
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Old 06-11-11, 11:34 PM   #9
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I favored a spoke abundance rear 48 spokes, front 40.

you could use lighter spokes due toi the higher count..

I used 88 14 gage, only broke 1 spoke in a decade of riding..

sold the prior wheel set, built another .. zero problems ..


still have 47 spares already in the wheel when that 1 broke..

*

just cannibalized a wheel off a bike on the floor

to sell a tourist a wheel with more than 32 spokes,

as they were popping like kettle corn..

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Old 06-12-11, 04:12 AM   #10
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With your current wheels, the only reason you are going to start snapping spokes if if your chain comes off the big cog and cuts into the drive-side spokes. Once that happens they will start to break over time.
You are travelling though bike-shop country so I wouldnt worry too much.
I usually carry a couple of driveside spokes but you also need a gadget to remove the rear cogs.
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Old 06-12-11, 11:55 AM   #11
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With your current wheels, the only reason you are going to start snapping spokes if if your chain comes off the big cog and cuts into the drive-side spokes. Once that happens they will start to break over time.
You are travelling though bike-shop country so I wouldnt worry too much.
I usually carry a couple of driveside spokes but you also need a gadget to remove the rear cogs.
Problem is that I have nerver really built nor trued a wheel so Id be more inclined to take the entire rim with me instead of having to incompetently play with this.
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Old 06-12-11, 12:06 PM   #12
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Problem is that I have nerver really built nor trued a wheel so Id be more inclined to take the entire rim with me instead of having to incompetently play with this.
There is no magic or voodoo in replacing spokes or truing wheels.
Google "How to true a wheel".
Check the Park Tools Repair help page.
You will be a lot more confident, less anxious on your tour when you learn to do these things.
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Old 06-12-11, 01:07 PM   #13
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probably you're right!

Speaking from experience, which parts of the bike are most susceptible to damage while on a long-distance journey?
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Old 06-12-11, 01:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Speaking from experience,
wouldn't that be the individuals unique experience?
Quote:
which parts of the bike are most susceptible to damage while on a long-distance journey?
Journey to where over what kind of road,
and having been a person to fuss over their bike , versus someone who did little service?
and for how long a time on the road...
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Old 06-12-11, 01:37 PM   #15
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I agree, but I dont have the experience, hence the question

As I wrote at the beginning, I want to go from London to South-Eastern Poland, which I assume would take 2,5 weeks in total.
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Old 06-12-11, 02:04 PM   #16
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stuff gets knocked off, derailleurs.. are vulnerable
mind where you go. and paved roads reduce that . to rare.

run an IG hub instead perhaps?

Your tire bursts out the side, bring out tire #3, and be on your way.



the spoke thing has been done over.

Do a full maintenance , and replace questionable parts before you leave. ?

or just let fate tell you where things need replacement. and bring spares..

how do you favor crossing the channel ?

doesn't have to be a pedaling the alps, kind of big deal,
like starting riding from Calais, to Warsaw,
You could take a ferry
from the northern British port ,
to one on the Danish coast, Esbjerg, take another ferry from Copenhagen.
to Swinoujscie, or Gdansk, and be there in no time at all,
cycling from one port to another..

then say Ride to Krakow, , take the train back to Gdansk , and make the return trips ..

FWIW, its all got paved roads to ride on.. over there ..
they all went in for metaled roads,, pavement abounds..

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Old 06-12-11, 05:50 PM   #17
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probably you're right!

Speaking from experience, which parts of the bike are most susceptible to damage while on a long-distance journey?
Tubes, tires, wheels in that order.
Learn how to adjust derailleurs, how to adjust the stops and cable tension, straighten a bent derailleur hanger.
Derailleurs are very robust, I've only had one fail from hitting a rock while MTBing, in over 20 years of riding.
They are available anywhere, are cheap, light, and easy to diagnose, adjust, or replace.
Bring extra chain links, chain tool, and know how to repair a broken chain.
Make sure your hubs and headset are freshly greased and adjusted before you go.
Douse your shifters with WD40 and lube your cables.
Check your bottom bracket for roughness or play.
Check your wheels for even spoke tension.
Check chain "stretch".
Do these things and you probably won't have a bit of trouble on your trip.

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Old 06-14-11, 09:33 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by GeoKrpan View Post
Tubes, tires, wheels in that order.
Learn how to adjust derailleurs, how to adjust the stops and cable tension, straighten a bent derailleur hanger.
Derailleurs are very robust, I've only had one fail from hitting a rock while MTBing, in over 20 years of riding.
They are available anywhere, are cheap, light, and easy to diagnose, adjust, or replace.
Bring extra chain links, chain tool, and know how to repair a broken chain.
Make sure your hubs and headset are freshly greased and adjusted before you go.
Douse your shifters with WD40 and lube your cables.
Check your bottom bracket for roughness or play.
Check your wheels for even spoke tension.
Check chain "stretch".
Do these things and you probably won't have a bit of trouble on your trip.
Thanks GeoKrpan and fietsbob for your replies! I have most of that stuff covered, the only things I cannot do is build and true a wheel, which I have plenty of times for to practice as Im not going for that trip until the next year.

Going along the coastline will sure be very nice but I dont want to come back the same way. There's a lot of planning to be done

Thanks a lot guys!
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