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  1. #1
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    Handlebar bags: attachment wire

    I got the Louis Garneau HB-09 http://www.amazon.com/Louis-Garneau-.../dp/B00506YT2Y
    and am disappointed in a couple of things. It seems humongous and too boxlike---too large and bulky for everyday use, and too heavy. The mounting bracket doesn't really hold the bag up correctly due to the flexible plastic liner.

    I was unable to access the screws on my adjustable stem and had to remove the mounting bracket. I think it's going to be impossible to reinsert the wire that holds the bracket on the stem and keeps the bag from sinking down.

    Question: Do most bags have this wire? Are they all as difficult to install and remove as the Louis Garneau? I notice that this Bushwhacker also has this wire: http://www.bushwhackerbags.com/handle_bar_bags.html I need to be able to remove and reinstall the mounting bracket at will.

    I scoured the internet for the right handlebar bag---not too large, not too small, lots of pockets. The Lone Peak 100 looks good but it's even larger than the Louis Garneau HB-09. I don't want to have that much weight on the handlebar.

  2. #2
    the bike made me do it oneredstar's Avatar
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    Most handlebar bags that I have seen mount the same way as yours. I believe Arkel makes a very nice mount though. I have never been a fan of handlebar bags though. They are very bulky and too large for my liking.

  3. #3
    Flying and Riding sam21fire's Avatar
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    I've used the smaller Arkel handlebar bag for many years and found it to be very stable. The internal plastic "frame" keeps it from drooping. It's just large enough for the stuff I want to keep handy or be able to take with me on a hike or into a store w/o being so large that I overload it. The mounting via 2 brackets is solid but can be a little tricky to get both brackets aligned exactly parallel...if they're off by more than a small amount attaching/detaching can take some wiggling; when they're aligned it's easy on/off.

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    The best barbag mount is Rixen and Kaul Klickfix. A number of good bagmakers use it.
    Ortleib use a similar style of mounting but ay not be compatable with the R&K version.
    My Carradice bar bag uses R&K fittings. It is a nice size with one zip pocket and 2 internal side pouches. The mount is quick-release in an instant but is totally secure even down rough off-road descents.

  5. #5
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    I install a second stem and mount my bag to that.
    Everything should be as simple as possible...But not more so.---Albert Einstein

  6. #6
    Senior Member Eric S.'s Avatar
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    I just bought a Garneau HB-09. It didn't come with any instructions, and I cannot figure out how to use the anti-sag wire. Here are a couple pictures of the mount - can anyone describe what to do with this cable? The mount holds up pretty well with a couple inner tube strips in the clamps, but still begins to droop after a few miles of bumps.

    15905073-lg.jpg

    15905072-lg.jpg
    Last edited by Eric S.; 06-12-12 at 02:13 PM. Reason: bad grammar

  7. #7
    Slow Rider bwgride's Avatar
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    Try the Ortlieb instructions for an idea of how to wrap the support wire around a stem:

    http://www.ortlieb.com/_anleit/ultimate5.pdf

  8. #8
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    I miss the old support arms that hung over the stem and went into the sleeves on the bag. Sometimes improvements...aren't.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

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  9. #9
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    I've just reinstalled my waterproof Tioga handlebar bag and it has the best bar mount -- it has no wire to stop the sag, but rather the mount is moulded to insert under the stem. It does have four screws to undo, to remove the mount, but that's only a two-minute job.

    As to the wire, most other bags rely on this to prevent sagging, although the MEC bar bags we have use a shoe lace each.

    One end of the wire should already be attached to the mount. There should be a screw or bolt in a similar position on the other side. When putting on the mount, don't do it up too tightly in the position you want, but rather twist it up into a more vertical, 12 o'clock position.

    Thread the wire under the handlebar on the first side, over the stem and under the bar on the other side. Locate it in the fixing screw (which can be a real bear because the wire wants to unravel).

    Don't cut of the excess until you find the right position for the bag after twisting the mount back down to the vertical position (about the 2.30 position looking at it from the right side). I'd suggest you have the mount slightly higher than where you think it should be to allow the cable to settle in and straighten out any kinks.

    The Topeak bag mounts allow you to thread the wire into some tabs on the face of the mount. Also, there should be a piece of plastic tubing that the wire inserts into, to prevent the bare wire from rubbing away the finish on the stem and bar.

    I am not sure why the OP wants to remove the mount from the bar at will. If there is another bike to put the bag on, just buy another mount and leave both permanently attached. I am also a little puzzled as to why the bag was bought in the first place if it has turned out to be so unsuitable.

    Buying anything is a crap shoot. But those of us who have been in this game for a while know this. That's why we can offer advice on a broad range of subjects like this because we do experiment (which is another way of saying, we've made some mistakes, too). But we don't necessarily come here and bag out the items that don't quite suit our needs.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Eric S.'s Avatar
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    Thanks for the replies. The brass-looking parts in the Garneau mount have threads; I assume those are supposed to lock the support cable tension. The bag didn't come with any hardware for that, and from what I've found online it may never have.

    This blog shows the unassembled mount hardware:
    http://www.tamiasoutside.com/2009/10/22/lgbb/

    And this link to the HB-8.5 shows all the mount hardware, but no screws for the cable:
    http://www.realcyclist.com/louis-garneau-box-hb-8.5-bag

    I worked at a bike shop in the early 1980s and we sold a lot of Kirtland Tour Paks. I never actually rode a bike with one, but setup could not have been easier. I'm tempted to buy some materials and try to figure out a "forklift"-type support for a handlebar bag.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/elkulak/4988436575/

    EDIT: I just discovered a small allen screw deep in the brass bushing. Only on one side, though. I have some old derailleur cables so I think I can get this rigged.
    Last edited by Eric S.; 06-12-12 at 06:12 PM. Reason: added info

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    I miss the old support arms that hung over the stem and went into the sleeves on the bag. Sometimes improvements...aren't.

    Aaron
    I still use one of them. I had to custom bend up a support for it because the newer threadless stems don't fit the support bracket that was designed for quill stems.

    IMG_4906.jpg

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric S. View Post
    Thanks for the replies. The brass-looking parts in the Garneau mount have threads; I assume those are supposed to lock the support cable tension. The bag didn't come with any hardware for that, and from what I've found online it may never have.

    This blog shows the unassembled mount hardware:
    http://www.tamiasoutside.com/2009/10/22/lgbb/

    And this link to the HB-8.5 shows all the mount hardware, but no screws for the cable:
    http://www.realcyclist.com/louis-garneau-box-hb-8.5-bag

    I worked at a bike shop in the early 1980s and we sold a lot of Kirtland Tour Paks. I never actually rode a bike with one, but setup could not have been easier. I'm tempted to buy some materials and try to figure out a "forklift"-type support for a handlebar bag.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/elkulak/4988436575/

    EDIT: I just discovered a small allen screw deep in the brass bushing. Only on one side, though. I have some old derailleur cables so I think I can get this rigged.
    Yes, sorry, I think I am a bit askew with my instructions when I think about it. Unfortunately, all my bikes except for the one with the Tioga bar bag are in storage.

    But if you follow those directions listed by another poster, you should be right.

    The grub screw is key. If you use a shifter cable, it should be thin and bendable enough, and if you use one with the small barrel-shaped end on it, it should fit in one side of the mount, then thread the cable over the handlebars and under the stem, and back into the brass fitting with grub screw. Adjust from there.

    The MEC bags I mentioned have the fork or horn arrangement, and the bags can be easily slipped on and off using the velcro straps. Otherwise it's a simple matter to remove the bag with horns attached. The mount, though, remains on the bike.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  13. #13
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    I've been using a Jandd. It has a very easy attachment system and seems to keep its shape due to an internal aluminum stay and plastic liners.

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Klick fix bar bag brackets only use a coated cable to resist twisting under load, and road bumps.
    the nylon U clips hold it on firmly..

    And you can hang Ortlieb's bags on KF mounts [not Visa Versa]

    I install a second stem and mount my bag to that.
    and have a KF mount on it, also another seatpost rear mount to use.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 06-12-12 at 09:42 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
    I still use one of them. I had to custom bend up a support for it because the newer threadless stems don't fit the support bracket that was designed for quill stems.

    IMG_4906.jpg
    What did you use for the frame? I have a couple of old bags that were given to me that are missing the brackets. I liked them because they were easy to move from bike to bike, none of this having to pay for extra brackets.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
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  16. #16
    Senior Member Eric S.'s Avatar
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    EDIT: I just discovered a small allen screw deep in the brass bushing. Only on one side, though. I have some old derailleur cables so I think I can get this rigged.
    I first thought of using a derailleur cable because of its small stop on one end, but I found a screw to put in the other bushing so I'm all set up with the original cable.

  17. #17
    Senior Member tourbiker's Avatar
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    I have two of the three models of the Topeak handlebar bags. The small bag for commuting and short trips. The medium size for touring with my camera. It's a great camera bag for travel. I found the large one was too large for me.
    http://www.topeak.com/products/Bags/...deHandlebarBag

    I bought 5 of the mounts: one of each of four of my bikes plus a spare. It uses a wire to hold the mount in place. I take the extra mount with me when I go on vacation and rent bikes. I've easily been able to mount, remove and remount it on different rental bikes.

    I highly recommend these Topeak bags.
    '07 Marinoni Turismo Touring, '83 Trek 620 Touring, Trek 1500wsd road bike
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  18. #18
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    This comment was specific to the photo shown in post number 11 or 15 above, quite off topic from the original posting.

    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    What did you use for the frame? I have a couple of old bags that were given to me that are missing the brackets. I liked them because they were easy to move from bike to bike, none of this having to pay for extra brackets.

    Aaron
    I used a steel rod. I have a really big vice bolted to a work bench that I built when I moved into my condo, the work bench is physically attached to the garage wall. Thus, the vice is solid enough that I can use it and a 16 inch long crescent wrench to bend quarter inch steel rods quite easily. Took some time to think it out and plan it, but I managed to bend it into the desired shape pretty easily. Patience counts here, if you are in a hurry and try to make each bend once, you won't be happy, start and work slow with minute adjustments to each bend as you make them. Afterwhich I slid three short pieces of rubber hose onto the frame where I wanted them to sit on the handlebar and stem (to avoid metal on metal contact), slides a lot easier if you first coat the inside of the hose with dish soap. One of those rubber hoses started to split later, you can see some white color to the immediate left of the bolts on the front of the stem, that is where I have some fine cord (similar to floss) wrapped around the hose to keep it from splitting farther. If I was to do it again, I would probably skip the rubber hoses and just use several wraps of electrical tape or possibly old style cloth handlebar tape instead. I spray painted it with black paint, but the paint did not bond well to the galvanized rod, you can see in the photo lots of places where the paint fell off the rod.

    Do you need better photos of the rod support?

    I cropped the photo below out of another photo for a close up of the bag I use. I wish they still made them like that. I have been considering trying to make one from scratch that fixes a few of the things I do not like about this bag.

    croppedIMG_4917.jpg

  19. #19
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
    This comment was specific to the photo shown in post number 11 or 15 above, quite off topic from the original posting.



    I used a steel rod. I have a really big vice bolted to a work bench that I built when I moved into my condo, the work bench is physically attached to the garage wall. Thus, the vice is solid enough that I can use it and a 16 inch long crescent wrench to bend quarter inch steel rods quite easily. Took some time to think it out and plan it, but I managed to bend it into the desired shape pretty easily. Patience counts here, if you are in a hurry and try to make each bend once, you won't be happy, start and work slow with minute adjustments to each bend as you make them. Afterwhich I slid three short pieces of rubber hose onto the frame where I wanted them to sit on the handlebar and stem (to avoid metal on metal contact), slides a lot easier if you first coat the inside of the hose with dish soap. One of those rubber hoses started to split later, you can see some white color to the immediate left of the bolts on the front of the stem, that is where I have some fine cord (similar to floss) wrapped around the hose to keep it from splitting farther. If I was to do it again, I would probably skip the rubber hoses and just use several wraps of electrical tape or possibly old style cloth handlebar tape instead. I spray painted it with black paint, but the paint did not bond well to the galvanized rod, you can see in the photo lots of places where the paint fell off the rod.

    Do you need better photos of the rod support?

    I cropped the photo below out of another photo for a close up of the bag I use. I wish they still made them like that. I have been considering trying to make one from scratch that fixes a few of the things I do not like about this bag.

    croppedIMG_4917.jpg
    Thanks

    I have rod and tubing as well as the tools to go at it. I am going to try plasti-dip on mine versus the tubing. I just wanted to see if I was on the right track. I suppose you could use stainless rod...

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    Thanks

    I have rod and tubing as well as the tools to go at it. I am going to try plasti-dip on mine versus the tubing. I just wanted to see if I was on the right track. I suppose you could use stainless rod...

    Aaron
    Since I am getting ready for my next trip, I just dug out my handlebar bag a bit early to take a couple more photos.

    First photo is of the frame that came with it on the left (appears to be fully "dipped" like you propose) and on the right is my homemade version.

    25IMGP2555.jpg

    Second photo shows just why I like these types of brackets so much, they do not take up a lot of valuable handlebar space like the newer brackets do. Sorry this photo is out of focus, the auto focus zeroed in on the grass in the background.

    25IMGP2556.jpg

  21. #21
    Senior Member cycleheimer's Avatar
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    I just finished a ride with my LG handlebar bag. The thing keeps dipping down, can't get it to stay level. My old Cannondale with a metal support bracket is still my favorite.
    Bike-A-Holic

  22. #22
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    In substitute for the Wire support, as in #20, I have one made by Klick-fix.

    It is interchangeable with the Eclipse/Kirtland type. But the Quick Removal is better..

    With it, I repurposed an Ortlieb Camera Bag as a Dry , padded handlebar bag.

  23. #23
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    Yeah, if I was going to take on a whole lot of cost or complexity it wouldn't be to have some key. Might be useful on a city bike, but not really for touring.

  24. #24
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    25IMGP2555.jpg

    MSN, I love that frame and miss the excellent bags that used to be made to fit it. I got rid of the Louis Garneau HB-09 and have been looking for a new bag ever since. Front bags in my opinion used to be much better---simple, practical, and cheap.

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