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Thread: wtb saddles

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    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    wtb saddles

    I saw someone mention that WTB saddles are fairly common on touring bikes. So, if you're using one, what model is it? Their web site was fairly lacking in information, so I can't tell which saddle would be appropriate for touring.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  2. #2
    It's true, man.
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    I have one of the "V" models on my Inbred tourer. I don't recall if it's the Pure V or the Pro V, or what. It's fine. My main consideration was getting one that didn't have any stitching or decoration that would touch any of my softer bits. I have a Brooks and a Specialized that I like better.

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    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    The appropriate one is the one that fits you right

    Almost all my bikes have Rocket V Pro's on them.

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    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
    The appropriate one is the one that fits you right
    Yea, I just thought maybe I could get a consensus as a starting point.

    I'm about ready to give up on the Brooks for the 3rd model now. No matter what I do, I'm just not feeling the love. I just can't believe that what I have is as good as it gets.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

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    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
    Almost all my bikes have Rocket V Pro's on them.
    I had my sit bones measured a few years ago, and most saddles are actually narrower than my sit bone measurement. I think I was about 135 MM, IIRC. So when I get into wider non-leather saddles I tend to find a lot of padding.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

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    Senior Member Wheelmonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    I had my sit bones measured a few years ago, and most saddles are actually narrower than my sit bone measurement. I think I was about 135 MM, IIRC. So when I get into wider non-leather saddles I tend to find a lot of padding.
    How does one go about getting their sit bones measured. That interests me. Is it something I could do on my own?

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    To measure your sit bones fill a 2 gallon zip lock baggie with some flour so when it's sealed and burped of air it will be about an inch thick. Put it on top of a toilet seat lid and lean forward to a riding position while rocking around a bit. Works perfectly.

    WTB saddles tend to be over-padded with the exception of the Devo, Deva, and Siverado. These saddles are also flat side to side and front to back which seems to work better IMO.
    Last edited by Clem von Jones; 07-12-11 at 12:44 PM.

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    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clem von Jones View Post
    WTB saddles tend to be over-padded with the exception of the Devo, Deva, and Siverado. These saddles are also flat side to side and front to back which seems to work better IMO.
    Well, I'm taking a risk on the comfort V (probably the most padded saddle they have). I have no complaints with my Bontrager Boulevard (at least up to ~85 miles), other than numbness. If this saddle alleviates the numbness, I guess I don't care if it's over padded by long distance standards. If it works for me, I'll be happy.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

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    The best bet is to try to find a store that's a member of WTB's demo program. They'll have a eight or more saddles that you can check-out and use for test-rides. WTB offers to many different lengths, widths, and padding levels that it can be difficult to pick the right saddle without a little trial and error...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clem von Jones View Post
    To measure your sit bones fill a 2 gallon zip lock baggie with some flour so when it's sealed and burped of air it will be about an inch thick. Put it on top of a toilet seat lid and lean forward to a riding position while rocking around a bit. Works perfectly.
    This may work perfectly, but it doesn't really tell you anything. Manufacturers have numerous different ways that they measure saddle width. Knowing how far apart your sit bones are doesn't really help you determine which saddle to buy unless you know exactly how the saddle manufacturer calculates the width.

    Even then there's a lot of personal preference involved. I was measured using Specialized's Ass-o-meter and told I needed to buy one of their 143mm saddle. Hated them all! The only Specialized saddle I can ride for any length of time is the 130mm-wide Phenom that came with my mountain bike...

  11. #11
    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    The best bet is to try to find a store that's a member of WTB's demo program. They'll have a eight or more saddles that you can check-out and use for test-rides. WTB offers to many different lengths, widths, and padding levels that it can be difficult to pick the right saddle without a little trial and error...
    It would be great if the saddle I thought I wanted was part of the program. That, and if their dealer locator was working. I've accepted that I've ordered 2 saddles and one or both may be duds that need a re-sell.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  12. #12
    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chandltp View Post
    It would be great if the saddle I thought I wanted was part of the program. That, and if their dealer locator was working. I've accepted that I've ordered 2 saddles and one or both may be duds that need a re-sell.
    Just a FYI, Performance sells a lot of the WTB line and as long as you don't trash the saddle they'll take it back no questions asked.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
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    Bought a Speed V Comp a few weeks back, replacing the stock saddle on my GT. Seems good up to about 45-50 miles then it begins hurting me a lot. It's far better than my old saddle which would begin hurting around 10 miles, but I've done 2 metric centuries and a 52 miler on it, and damn it's starting to kill me on those longer rides.

    I'm seriously considering just going for a Brooks now.


    EDIT: I should note that I'm wearing gym shorts over padded bike shorts. I am going to attempt just wearing the bike shorts next to see if that lessens the discomfort. It's possible that may be the cause. So much for modesty... sigh.

  14. #14
    Senior Member rockpilex's Avatar
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    I must have a steel butt, or I'm really good at bike set up. My bikes have these saddles; concors,turbo, prologo nago evo, flite, b17, b68 all work for me. Ps. I have a chamois in my shorts.

  15. #15
    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
    Just a FYI, Performance sells a lot of the WTB line and as long as you don't trash the saddle they'll take it back no questions asked.
    I'm pretty sure I checked and they didn't have the Comfort V, which was the width I was looking for. If I decide to go for one of the narrower ones, I'll have to remember to look.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  16. #16
    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    As a side note, I've tried 3 models of Brooks. My experience varied from being so miserable after a week that I didn't want to go near my bike to just being mildly uncomfortable. In any case, I never felt the love and decided that somehow, it had to get better.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clem von Jones View Post
    To measure your sit bones fill a 2 gallon zip lock baggie...
    Another method is to place a piece of corrugated cardboard on a hard, flat surface. Sit on it naked. Move around a bit so that your sit bones live dimples in the corrugated board. Measure distance between center of dimples to determine sit bone width.

    I've had the best luck with the old style SI Flite saddle, which is only 10-15mm wider than my sit bones. My bikes are set-up with the handlebar ~10mm lower than saddle - just a little below level to saddle. This position evolved from lots of riding to determine best fit.

    I think there's more to good saddle fit than just having one wider than your sit bones. You actually sit on soft tissue when riding, not just the ischial tuberosity ("sit bones"). I've found saddles that sag or "hammock" even a little bit don't support the perineum, and it's uncomfortable for me. IME good quality "plastic" saddles sag less than tensioned leather (brooks style) over time. I get more saddle longevity from San Marco and Selle Italia saddles than Brooks for this reason. I have several saddles that I don't use, all part of the "trail and error" process. I've never tried WTB saddles, or Fizik (too expensive).
    Last edited by seeker333; 07-17-11 at 08:40 AM.

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    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    i've found the rocket V works well for me on bikes with the bar and saddle heights roughly the same. YMMV, of course.

    -rob

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    Laser V.

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    Senior Member alan s's Avatar
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    Rocket V. If you wear padded lycra shorts, don't get one with seams that could cause wear.

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    Simple method of finding sit bones spacing is to get some wood slats, place them on the floor, and adjust their spacing until you feel you are resting on top of them.

  22. #22
    Senior Member chandltp's Avatar
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    I guess I should mention my handlebars are higher than my seat. I'm sitting almost completely upright. If the Comfort V doesn't work, I'll be checking Performance Bike for the Rocket V. That was my 2nd choice.
    There are 10 types of people, those that understand binary and those that don't.

  23. #23
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    a wider saddle is a common choice, as the riding posture is more upright.

    Guys may like a woman's performance oriented saddle,
    or a 'unisex' with a wider shape, but firmer padding..

    I Use a Fi'zi:k Vitesse on my daily rider..

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