Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What GPS do you use for touring?

    I think I am about to buy a Garmin Edge 800. Mainly for planning routes on back roads and following others previous tracks.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member chrisch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Rotkreuz, Switzerland
    My Bikes
    Trek 520, Gary Fisher Big Sur
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use a Garmin Legend Cx loaded with the OpenCycleMaps from velomap.org.
    TrackMyTour.com - An iPhone app for Bike Touring! See who's touring now and where.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Sachelis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Tarmac (roadie) and 2011 56cm 600 LHT (touring)
    Posts
    111
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneli View Post
    I think I am about to buy a Garmin Edge 800. Mainly for planning routes on back roads and following others previous tracks.

    Thanks
    There is an active thread on this topic at http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...Bike-computers.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,337
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i think i asked about gps units before got loads of advice on them but mostly jargon of which i know nothing about.
    so how hard can it be to say buy any sat nav (GPS) tell it were you want to go and surly it will guide you there.
    isn't that what there supposed to do.

  5. #5
    BeaverTerror Yan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    My Bikes
    2013 True North custom touring; 2009 Unicycle.com Club Uni; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport
    Posts
    1,593
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use an Ipad with one of the many GPS apps. It's not a functional as a dedicated GPS unit, but it's also more flexible and is good enough. This is a backup. I refer to paper maps first.
    Yan

    2013 True North custom touring; 2010 Novara Randonee; 2009 Unicycle.com Club 24"; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,089
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Daneli View Post
    I think I am about to buy a Garmin Edge 800. Mainly for planning routes on back roads and following others previous tracks.
    If you want to pre-plan your routes at home and have a GPS unit guide you along them, the Garmin units work great. I used my Edge 705 when I rode from San Francisco to Los Angeles and it was much easier than trying to navigate with a paper map.

    That said, I would only rely on the GPS unit's built-in routing functions in an emergency. If you just plug in a destination, the route you'll end up with is often far from optimal. The Edge, at least, is only smart enough to keep you off of interstate freeways and unpaved roads. It won't take hills, car traffic, or other factors into account which can lead to some pretty miserable riding...

  7. #7
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,339
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post

    That said, I would only rely on the GPS unit's built-in routing functions in an emergency. If you just plug in a destination, the route you'll end up with is often far from optimal. The Edge, at least, is only smart enough to keep you off of interstate freeways and unpaved roads. It won't take hills, car traffic, or other factors into account which can lead to some pretty miserable riding...
    And sometimes it tries too hard to be a nanny. I was on a ride where I knew I was only a few miles from my destination. It was a hot a miserable day so I wanted to know EXACTLY how far to my destination. So I picked my destination and had it do it route. It came to something like 35 miles!

    It was trying to protect me from a mile or two of road that it thought was too busy for me to travel. When I knew all to well that that section was perfectly safe. What is crazy is that it was taking me on a road, far busier then the one I was on!

    What I don't like about the GPS is the screens are far too small to see where the GPS wants to take you. Even the larger screen on my GPS AMp 60 is a bit small. That is why I am considering moving to a tablet PC with on board GPS and mapping software.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

    Albert Einstein

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Old Pueblo
    My Bikes
    2008 Surly LHT, 1985 Nishiki Prestige, 1985 Miyata 310, 2013 Surly Troll
    Posts
    105
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use my Garmin Etrex Legend. I bought it originally for hiking, but they sell a bike mount, so it works fine.

    ETA: It does require a bit more advance planning, because it's harder to mess with the gps on the bike. But that's probably a good thing for me.

  9. #9
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Parkville, Md
    Posts
    7,615
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Personally on road tours I leave the GPS home.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    638
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Garmin GPSMap 60 csx. I 've had it for about 5 years now and it has functioned in rainy days on my motorcycle, hiking, snowshoweing, and of course biking. I plan most of my routes on the PC or get them from ridewithgps.com, and then load them into the GPS unit. The one feature I think is important is that the unit use AA batteries. I can pick those up anywhere and not have to worry about charging some internal battery that some units use.
    1965 Moulton Speed 4, 1974 Fuji 12 speed, 1987 DB Ascent EX, 2006 Dahon Speed TR, 2009 Salsa Fargo, 2011 Gravity 29.4, 2011 Salsa Casseroll, 2012 Surly Moonlander

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Gaseous Cloud around Uranus
    Posts
    3,399
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Map and compass...$20....batteries don't die,But you must use brain.....
    Everything should be as simple as possible...But not more so.---Albert Einstein

  12. #12
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Central Coast, CA
    My Bikes
    Surly LHT, Specialized Rockhopper, Nashbar Touring (old), Specialized Stumpjumper (older), Nishiki Tourer (model unknown)
    Posts
    3,388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Garmin Vista HcX. I've taken it on two tours. One was on the road, on the Lewis and Clark route. One I just finished, on the Montana portion of the Great Divide Route, on dirt roads and trails.

    On the road ride it was of very limited value, as much because of my lack of knowledge of how to use it as anything else. On the Great Divide it was very valuable. It confirmed the positions and turns we got from using the maps.

    It could be much easier. One of the problems is the way the programmers designed the software. It doesn't seem intuitive at all. For me there was a pretty steep learning curve. Another issue is the size of the screen. I can see the purple route and the triangles for the waypoints and for my position. For everything else I need my reading glasses. I can't stop to put on my reading glasses every time I want to see something!

    Another problem is that the waypoints that you download from ACA's site are all given obscure, arcane names. You can't tell what anything is from its name. Furthermore, the process of taking ACA's routes and using them to create your own is a pretty lengthy, tedious one. I started a week before I left and only managed to get the first 14 days done.

    Another issue with Garmin's mapping software is that if they don't have a road on their map, you can't go there. A few times I had two waypoints that were close together, but Garmin didn't know that there was a way to get between them, so it would backtrack a long way to go around via roads it knew. And this was on the topographic map, which is supposed to allow you to go offroad!

    Since I paid the money for the unit, I'm going to continue using it, and continue trying to learn to make it more useful. I'm not going to give it a ringing endorsement. If you have the money and the patience (and perhaps the eyesight) you may find it very useful. If not, the maps are much more useful, as long as you do a few things to make them useful, e. g. figure out each day's mileage to the turns, campsites, etc. from your starting point, accurately calibrate your bike's computer, and pay attention. (This last was partly why I bought the gps. Several times I spaced out or didn't figure the mileages right and missed a turn or a campsite. When I did my "due diligence" this didn't happen. The ACA maps are pretty good.)

    One last thing. When I had the streets map loaded, the Garmin was helpful in finding restaurants, motels, etc. I could use it just like the gps in my car. I didn't have to preload anything; all the points of interest were there, including phone numbers. When I used the topographic map this time, none of that information was there. I'm thinking next time I might bring two microSD cards with me - one with the streets software and one the topo.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,089
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by BigBlueToe View Post
    Another problem is that the waypoints that you download from ACA's site are all given obscure, arcane names. You can't tell what anything is from its name. Furthermore, the process of taking ACA's routes and using them to create your own is a pretty lengthy, tedious one. I started a week before I left and only managed to get the first 14 days done.
    When I rode down the Pacific Coast, I found the ACA's data files to be relatively useless. It was much quicker for me to map the route myself using Bicycling the Pacific Coast and the ACA maps as a reference than to try to use ACA's data. I think it took me one long evening to plot my entire 550-mile route down the Pacific Coast...

    Another issue with Garmin's mapping software is that if they don't have a road on their map, you can't go there. A few times I had two waypoints that were close together, but Garmin didn't know that there was a way to get between them, so it would backtrack a long way to go around via roads it knew. And this was on the topographic map, which is supposed to allow you to go offroad!
    I've never tried to use Garmin's software. The online mapping software I use generally has a setting which forces your route to stay on-road. You have to turn it off if you want to go "off-road". Some of the better sites will automatically follow bike paths and trails if you enable the right settings.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •