Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Refitting an old bike as a tourer

    I can't get it out of my mind - I want to ride the entire Katy Trail this fall... I have a stable of bikes but none are touring rigs and I don't see a Surly or Bruce Gordon in my financial future, at least not this year. There is that beautiful old teal Fuji Tivoli... it is lugged steel and has some braze-ons (for panniers?). The Katy Trail is hard-packed gravel, pretty much flat from end to end since it's an old rail line. I'll need suitable tires, sure. What do you think - is this doable? What else needs to be done to make the Fuji a passable tourer?
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chicago!
    Posts
    212
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, there are a lot of questions to answer. If it's the same as this one - http://classicfuji.com/Tivoli_1988_Page.htm - then as long as it's in ok riding condition you should be fine to do the Katy Trail.

    - the whole trail (now that the eastern end is in Machens, not St. Charles) is about 240 miles. How many miles/day do you want to do, and will you just go on the trail (or will you ride further, for instance to get to or from either KC or STL on either end)? Some would do the whole trail in two days, some would take a week.
    - will you be camping or staying indoors?
    - how much do you want to spend?

    Easiest would be to get a big Carradice saddlebag and a big handlebar bag, and stay indoors. There are tons of places to stay on the trail or not far from it, they range in price from $5 for a night at the hostel in Tebbetts, to as expensive as you'd like in a place like Hermann or Jeff City.

    If you want to camp, you'll probably need at least a rear rack. The Tivoli has fender eyelets on the dropouts, but you'd need to use p-clamps on the seat stays. Easy enough to do, you just need to make sure your rack/pannier combo gives you space for your feet while pedaling.

    The crushed limestone surface of the Katy is pretty friendly to tires, as long as it's not really wet. I'd check tire clearance, as you'll probably want at least 28mm tires. Though 25s would probably work fine. I'm a fan of full fenders when riding too, especially with all of that dirt and dust along with possible wet - but that's up to you.

    So, yeah, it's doable. Go cheaper on the bike and you'll spend more on lodging; get fully outfitted on the bike and you've got the option of camping.

  3. #3
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry, should have gone into more detail. I'll take up to a week, easy pace, camp at least every other day. Haven't worked out the logistics. I've never done anything quite like this before, but hey, like the Viagra commercial says, I'm to the point in life where I know how to get things done. I'm just thinking about the mode now, will worry about the means later.

    I also have a Specialized Sequoia with mount points, etc. It's an aluminum bike. Would it be a better choice for refitting?
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chicago!
    Posts
    212
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Whichever one is in better mechanical shape and more comfortable for long rides is the one I would take. Both bikes are fine for the ride, not the most ideal, but both can be made workable. Last fall while I was riding the Katy on my way from KCMO to Chicago, I ran into a few 20-somethings who were riding three speed cruisers with their camping gear in milkcrates on the back. They seemed to be having the time of their lives.

  5. #5
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    On the road-USA
    My Bikes
    Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG
    Posts
    16,279
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can tour on just about anything. My first tour was on an old single speed Western Flyer, had a medium sized basket on it. Bed roll was strapped to the handle bars, repair kit in the seat bag and off we went. Been hooked every since.

    I routinely tour on my Raleigh Superbe with a large saddle bag and a rear rack, I tour on my Raleigh Twenty with a rack bag and small drop down panniers. I also have a couple of other bikes that are better suited for longer tours.

    Make sure you can fit a rack, fenders wouldn't hurt and tires in the 32+ range are good.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
    _Nicodemus

    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  6. #6
    Biker
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    New Mexico
    My Bikes
    One or more from each decade since 1960s
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good advice so far. A solid rack mount is a must, a good fit for your size is just as important, and a seat that you have ridden regularly would be nice. I"d make sure that chain and freewheel/freehub were in good condition because you don't want a skipping gear. Lube them at least if you don't think they need replacement. For the trail, I'd make sure I had a bell to alert walkers, etc. And yes some good tires 28-32 should do just fine, but realize that fenders may take some compromising or sacrifice. A front fender is much more needed because your stuff on the back will form a rear fender to a certain degree. I'd certainly check your head tube adjustment because you are going to live on the bike for a few days and that's distinct from a Saturday ride. Enjoy! Tom

  7. #7
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,883
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
    You can tour on just about anything. My first tour was on an old single speed Western Flyer, had a medium sized basket on it. Bed roll was strapped to the handle bars, repair kit in the seat bag and off we went. Been hooked every since.

    I routinely tour on my Raleigh Superbe with a large saddle bag and a rear rack, I tour on my Raleigh Twenty with a rack bag and small drop down panniers. I also have a couple of other bikes that are better suited for longer tours.

    Make sure you can fit a rack, fenders wouldn't hurt and tires in the 32+ range are good.

    Aaron
    Sure you can tour on any bike but you can also wear a cilice and do self flagellation. It may purify you but it won't necessarily be fun.

    I'd say stay away from the Fuji which falls more on the racing side of the bicycle world. Short, choppy ride that doesn't improve with a load and rough surface. Mounting racks would be more difficult and you are more likely to have problems mounting bags on the bike and being able to pedal without heel clipping the bags all the time.

    The Sequoia is marginally better. It's still a tad short but at least mounting a rack would be easier.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  8. #8
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Sure you can tour on any bike but you can also wear a cilice and do self flagellation. It may purify you but it won't necessarily be fun.

    I'd say stay away from the Fuji which falls more on the racing side of the bicycle world. Short, choppy ride that doesn't improve with a load and rough surface. Mounting racks would be more difficult and you are more likely to have problems mounting bags on the bike and being able to pedal without heel clipping the bags all the time.

    The Sequoia is marginally better. It's still a tad short but at least mounting a rack would be easier.
    I can't find a cilice large enough to fit around my massive cyclist thighs, and I also can't find Katy-trail suitable tires to fit 700c wheels. I think I want to do this adventure in mid-October, so there's no hurry... unless I'm saving money to buy a proper touring bike.
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  9. #9
    Senior Member blaise_f's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Phoenix
    My Bikes
    Surly Trucker
    Posts
    627
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My favorite touring bike is a 40s French bike. My second is a Specialized Hard Rock I got for free, converted to a 700c tourer, though, I consider going to 650b with it. The Specialized had garbage components on it, but you could very easily put a better groupset / handlebars / etc on it and tour. I changed it over to a Suntour component set, with mustache bars - it's a good grocery bike. Lots of early MTBs have bosses for racks on both the front and back. As well, there are *tons* (literally, thousands) of bikes from the 60s, 70s, 80s that were road bikes, but make excellent, bomb-proof tourers. I'm a C&V guy myself, so I prefer that road.
    http://bygonebicyclist.com
    Penny-farthing adventures, touring & collecting

  10. #10
    BeaverTerror Yan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Shanghai, China
    My Bikes
    2013 True North custom touring; 2009 Unicycle.com Club Uni; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport
    Posts
    1,604
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I frequently ride the rail trail near where I live on a road bike with 23mm tires. Surely you can slap some 28s and a rack on that Fuji and take it touring. In fact I rode around Lake Ontario (on proper roads) fully loaded with 23mm Vittoria Rubino Pros. No, I wouldn't do it again with those tires, but I survived. Get a Jandd Expedition rear rack. The extra length will prevent heel strike.
    Yan

    2013 True North custom touring; 2010 Novara Randonee; 2009 Unicycle.com Club 24"; 1989 Miele Tivoli; 1979 Colnago Sport

  11. #11
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,883
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by YokeyDokey View Post
    I can't find a cilice large enough to fit around my massive cyclist thighs, and I also can't find Katy-trail suitable tires to fit 700c wheels. I think I want to do this adventure in mid-October, so there's no hurry... unless I'm saving money to buy a proper touring bike.
    You shouldn't have a problem finding tires for 700C. 29er tires are really just 700C rebranded. I've used Continental Touring tires and Continental Contacts in 37mm width on the Katy. Worked well. Given recent experiences with Continentals and blowouts, I wouldn't recommend them. Schwable, Panaracer and others make tires that will work...if they fit in your frame.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  12. #12
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    You shouldn't have a problem finding tires for 700C. 29er tires are really just 700C rebranded. I've used Continental Touring tires and Continental Contacts in 37mm width on the Katy. Worked well. Given recent experiences with Continentals and blowouts, I wouldn't recommend them. Schwable, Panaracer and others make tires that will work...if they fit in your frame.
    Here's where I really show my ignorance - these wider tires fit the existing rims? I think the rims are 15mm inside measure. Whatever came with the bike.

    I measured the wheelbases of all my rides last night. The giant old Schwinn is the longest, 43", which is the same as a 58cm LHT, but the Schwinn is a 64cm gaspipe clunker, so it's not a candidate. The other bikes were all within a cm of each other in wheelbase. At this point, unless I fall backwards into either a pile of money or a proper touring bike, I'm back to the old Fuji.
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chicago!
    Posts
    212
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You should be fine with 32mm tires on that size rim, which is more than wide enough for the Katy Trail. Most of my limestone trail riding has been on either Continental Ultra Gatorskins or Panaracer Pasela TGs, between 28mm and 35mm wide. You could consider using a trailer with the Fuji as well, it all depends on what you have to spend - or sell one of the bikes and look for a used touring or sport touring bike from the mid 80's to mid 90's with the braze-ons you need.
    Last edited by threecarjam; 07-21-11 at 11:50 AM.

  14. #14
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Denver, CO
    My Bikes
    Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
    Posts
    15,883
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by YokeyDokey View Post
    Here's where I really show my ignorance - these wider tires fit the existing rims? I think the rims are 15mm inside measure. Whatever came with the bike.

    I measured the wheelbases of all my rides last night. The giant old Schwinn is the longest, 43", which is the same as a 58cm LHT, but the Schwinn is a 64cm gaspipe clunker, so it's not a candidate. The other bikes were all within a cm of each other in wheelbase. At this point, unless I fall backwards into either a pile of money or a proper touring bike, I'm back to the old Fuji.
    It's not the tires that fit the rims that's the problem but the tires you can fit in the frame that are the limiting factor on how wide a tire you can use. Measure between the forks and chain stays where the tires pass through. Give your self a little clearance on each side and see how wide a tire you can fit in there.

    Your rims are about the same dimensions as a high end mountain bike rim. I fit 2.3" tires on mine. You can't pump them up to 100 psi but they will fit. That width, however, is overkill. 28mm to 35mm is a good range for the Katy.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  15. #15
    Senior Member jakbikesdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    WesternSlopeCO
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Really anything'll do. I rode this bike (GT Rebound I bought new as a mtb in '99): on the Katy & MKT then south to Eminence, MO.http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/6924
    The last day I was on the KATY to COMO I rode with a cyclist who was touring on a Surly with smooth tires 700x25? I think. He said he had no prob. whatsoever.
    & Not a single flat! I've since evolved this bike into for a tour from Pcola, FL to Starkville, MS (still no flats!)....in 3wks or so I'll be on tour again, this time riding from MS to COSprings.
    We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive. -Aldo Leopold

  16. #16
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jakbikesdc View Post
    Really anything'll do. I rode this bike (GT Rebound I bought new as a mtb in '99): on the Katy & MKT then south to Eminence, MO.http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/6924
    The last day I was on the KATY to COMO I rode with a cyclist who was touring on a Surly with smooth tires 700x25? I think. He said he had no prob. whatsoever.
    & Not a single flat! I've since evolved this bike into for a tour from Pcola, FL to Starkville, MS (still no flats!)....in 3wks or so I'll be on tour again, this time riding from MS to COSprings.
    Whoa, that's a truck.
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  17. #17
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I had a moment of lucidity and realized that my touring bike was sitting right under my daughter's nose all the time - her aluminum Specialized Sequoia is purpose-built for the task. Triple, ratcheting stem, plenty of room for fenders and big tires, three cage mounts, heavy duty brakes... The frame is just a bit small but the seat's adjustable and I like a shorter cockpit anyway, and long wheelbase isn't as important for me because I'll pull a trailer. She doesn't know it yet, but she'll figure it out when she notices that I've replaced the purple speckled bar tape with something a bit more manly. This kills all kinds of birds with fewer stones. The Specialized has fancy low-count paired-spoke wheels that I planned to put on my new road bike anyway. So my new issue is - I want to use 28mm Schwalbe Marathon tires and need new wheels suited to the task. Without spending my pension. Recommendations?
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

  18. #18
    Senior Member jakbikesdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    WesternSlopeCO
    Posts
    184
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by YokeyDokey View Post
    Whoa, that's a truck.
    My bike is my concept of "home on the road". That's pretty much all I need for living purposes (I could actually do fine with less), Vagabiking around the US. I guess they say "yeah it's easy cuz you're young and single". Sure, why not! Wouldn't mind changing the single part though.
    We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive. -Aldo Leopold

  19. #19
    DisMember YokeyDokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2010 Fuji Roubaix, 1984 Schwinn World Sport
    Posts
    247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jakbikesdc View Post
    My bike is my concept of "home on the road". That's pretty much all I need for living purposes (I could actually do fine with less), Vagabiking around the US. I guess they say "yeah it's easy cuz you're young and single". Sure, why not! Wouldn't mind changing the single part though.
    I hope it's easy for old and single people too... I'll start finding out in October. The biking part, that is - I'm not changing the single part, it cost waaaaay too much to get that way hahaha

    You know why divorce costs so much? Because it's WORTH IT. :-DDD
    The Internet: Bringing the world's bathroom wall to your computer since 1995.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •