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Old 02-03-12, 02:38 PM   #1
SFGary
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Need help find a bike route from Phoenix (or Flagstaff) AZ - Pueblo, CO - part 2

Hi bike tourers

I need help find a bike route from Phoenix, AZ or Flagstaff to Pueblo, CO. I have heard that credit card touring (no camping) along this route may not be possible, is that true? Thanks

Gary
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Old 02-03-12, 03:02 PM   #2
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Well, now we're confused. No camping/credit card touring is an oxymoron in the cycling world. CC touring means motels and no cooking.

If you are doing a credit card tour, you'd have to research any route carefully to verify motels within daily riding distances, and call ahead for reservations. In the area you're proposing, that will mean you'd have to do a lot of interstate riding, a most disagreeable proposition for most, tho it is legal in AZ, NM, and CO, mostly.

For insurance and options, you should consider gearing up for light duty camping. With care, this can be done on a road bike with about 15 lbs of gear, or less. Water will be the big issue, even on long stretches of interstate, much less in the boonies.
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Old 02-03-12, 04:11 PM   #3
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Well, there are a number of pre-made routes nearby, you could start by looking at the Adventure Cycling maps for Grand Canyon Connector and Western Express. ACA maps have some hotel info.

That puts most of your route in Utah and Colorado, which would be my strong preference over the Four Corners area, which for me is too sandy and windy and poverty-stricken to make appealing touring. But it does take you through the parks, where accommodations can be hard to find if you are not camping. OTOH, the Santa Fe / Chama / Pagosa Springs area could be nice too. Personally I would stay off the Navajo Nation as much as possible (my bias, after driving there).

You're really going to have to do the leg work and mileage math yourself though with respect to the hotels, with your own knowledge of what's a reasonable amount of miles per day for you, taking into account terrain, time of year (Weather), and what kinds of landscape you prefer.

Devil's in the details, get out the map, the internet, crazyguy, ACA, and start pinning those details down.
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Old 02-04-12, 03:02 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
Well, now we're confused. No camping/credit card touring is an oxymoron in the cycling world. CC touring means motels and no cooking.

If you are doing a credit card tour, you'd have to research any route carefully to verify motels within daily riding distances, and call ahead for reservations. In the area you're proposing, that will mean you'd have to do a lot of interstate riding, a most disagreeable proposition for most, tho it is legal in AZ, NM, and CO, mostly.

For insurance and options, you should consider gearing up for light duty camping. With care, this can be done on a road bike with about 15 lbs of gear, or less. Water will be the big issue, even on long stretches of interstate, much less in the boonies.
Hi Cyclebum, sorry for the unclear language. I meant that I don't want to camp, if possible. I would like to motel/hotel it all the way. I do understand the water issue. Maybe I am not yet in shape but I use about a liter of water per hour of riding and that is probably a lot.

Gary
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Old 02-04-12, 03:13 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by valygrl View Post
Well, there are a number of pre-made routes nearby, you could start by looking at the Adventure Cycling maps for Grand Canyon Connector and Western Express. ACA maps have some hotel info.

That puts most of your route in Utah and Colorado, which would be my strong preference over the Four Corners area, which for me is too sandy and windy and poverty-stricken to make appealing touring. But it does take you through the parks, where accommodations can be hard to find if you are not camping. OTOH, the Santa Fe / Chama / Pagosa Springs area could be nice too. Personally I would stay off the Navajo Nation as much as possible (my bias, after driving there).

You're really going to have to do the leg work and mileage math yourself though with respect to the hotels, with your own knowledge of what's a reasonable amount of miles per day for you, taking into account terrain, time of year (Weather), and what kinds of landscape you prefer.

Devil's in the details, get out the map, the internet, crazyguy, ACA, and start pinning those details down.
Hi valygrl

Thanks for your reply, I'll look up the ACA Grand Canyon connector. What kind of terrain does the Santa Fe/Chama/Pagosa Springs area have?

Gary
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Old 02-04-12, 03:29 PM   #6
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Maybe I am not yet in shape but I use about a liter of water per hour of riding and that is probably a lot.
Gary
In normal temps, that does seem like a lot. But, water needs are very individualistic. I was cycling on 100+ days last summer, drinking 1/2 liter every 30 minutes by the clock in a water scarce section of SD. That was not enough, but I was forced to ration.
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Old 02-04-12, 05:29 PM   #7
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Hi valygrl

Thanks for your reply, I'll look up the ACA Grand Canyon connector. What kind of terrain does the Santa Fe/Chama/Pagosa Springs area have?

Gary
Semi-mountainous. I think the pass from Chama to Pagosa is around 7500 feet. Beautiful area, I've driven there in May and ridden there in June and both times it was lovely and green, with nice mild/warm temperatures. I haven't ridden around Santa Fe much, it's high but desert-y.
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