Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-11-12, 06:47 AM   #1
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Need advice on pannier size for 2-4 day touring.

Hi everyone, new to touring, but have been mountain biking for a long time. I was given some new panniers, they are 30L, (15L each side) for my touring bike. I only plan on doing touring for 2-4 days at a time. Do you all think I'll need larger ones? Maybe one for the front as well? Any and all ideas are appreciated since I've never done touring/camping before.
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 07:20 AM   #2
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
They are a bit small for long duration trips but OK for 2-4 days.
You can put your sleeping bag and tent on top of the rear rack.
If you reduce your footwear and cooking luggage, the rest takes up very little room.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 09:49 AM   #3
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,987
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by djyak View Post
Hi everyone, new to touring, but have been mountain biking for a long time. I was given some new panniers, they are 30L, (15L each side) for my touring bike. I only plan on doing touring for 2-4 days at a time. Do you all think I'll need larger ones? Maybe one for the front as well? Any and all ideas are appreciated since I've never done touring/camping before.
30L bags are on the large side. You could go with a smaller front pannier which are typically 15L to 20L. However, once you get past 2 overnights (3 days of riding), you are usually carrying as much stuff as you would for a week, a month or a year.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 10:31 AM   #4
Cyclebum 
Senior Member
 
Cyclebum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: NE Tx
Bikes: Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial
Posts: 2,768
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
30L bags are on the large side. You could go with a smaller front pannier which are typically 15L to 20L. However, once you get past 2 overnights (3 days of riding), you are usually carrying as much stuff as you would for a week, a month or a year.
Agree. Temp expectations are more relevant to pack volume than length of tour. With experience, you'll probably find that 30L panniers are too big as you learn to minimize your needs. Especially for summer touring, and with a rack pack. OTOH, never hurts to have a little extra room for unexpected this and thats.
__________________
The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me
Cyclebum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 11:16 AM   #5
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 6,096
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
It'll depend much more on your own packing style than on the length of the trip. Some people carry 40 lbs of stuff on an overnight outing while others manage with 15 lbs to go 3000 miles. So get together the things you plan to take along and see how well they fit in your current panniers.
Bike handling is usually better if you have some of the weight up front, so if things are tight with the panniers you have it's probably best to supplement them with a front pair rather than getting bigger ones.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 04:04 PM   #6
LeeG
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 4,672
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
smaller is better than bigger.
LeeG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 05:42 PM   #7
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks guys. I'm thinking of getting some small ones for the front, even out the load a bit, but again keeping them small. From the list I've compiled from here and a few other sites and friends, I won't need a whole lot. I've actually cut a lot out of the lists.
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 06:27 PM   #8
antokelly
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 2,971
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 43 Post(s)
don't go cutting out to much its a holiday on a bike after all why suffer comfort enjoy yourself buddy pack enough gear thats going to keep you smiling.
antokelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-12, 06:45 PM   #9
mtnbud
Senior Member
 
mtnbud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Salem Oregon
Bikes: 1986 Diamondback Ascent 1996 Klein Pulse Comp, 2006 Specialized Sequoia Elite
Posts: 480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Totally agree it's better to have some weight up front. I used to tour with all of my supplies on the rear rack. I finally bought a front rack and small panniers after seeing how much better my buddies bike handled with front panniers. Evening out the load does wonders for the handling of the bike. Small panniers up front and back are should be sufficient unless you plan on going hog wild on cooking gear and extra amenities. I try to keep my cooking needs simple. Packing light makes the hills much nicer.

If you plan appropriately, you probably don't need panniers up front and back. - It'll be nicer for bike handling and you can pack a little more.
mtnbud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 02:28 AM   #10
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just sticking to the minimum on cooking supplies, and my main focus of events is photography. The more I read all of the advice from all these forums, the more excited I'm getting for the trip.
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 06:43 AM   #11
Tourist in MSN
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Madison, WI
Bikes: 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 2015 VO Pass Hunter, 1961 Ideor, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, 1972 Raleigh Gran Prix, Perfekt 3 Speed of unknown age. Also a 1980s Bianchi Mixte on a trainer for indoor exercise.
Posts: 3,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)
Two days is only one night, you can do that without cooking gear. As noted by Cyccommute, once you are up to four days, that is a full load.

No two people carry the same amount. I usually carry a liquid fuel stove but a butane type is usually much smaller and lighter. I also enjoy food that has more preparation than freeze dried, which means more pots and utinsels. And, I usually avoid the heat, thus have to carry clothing and sleeping bag for sub freezing temperatures. You need to decide are you on the light side or heavy side on these types of issues, as they will dictate how much gear you need.

You can start with the two you have and a small duffle strapped on the rear rack and see if you need more or not. I preach trying what you have first before incurring major expense. But do not scrimp on the warm clothing.
Tourist in MSN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 07:11 AM   #12
Seb71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Romania
Bikes:
Posts: 175
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
30L bags are on the large side.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
Agree. Temp expectations are more relevant to pack volume than length of tour. With experience, you'll probably find that 30L panniers are too big as you learn to minimize your needs.
30L is the combined volume of his panniers. Each bag has 15L and I would not call 15L panniers as too big.
Seb71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 09:17 AM   #13
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seb71 View Post
30L is the combined volume of his panniers. Each bag has 15L and I would not call 15L panniers as too big.
Correct, each pannier is only 15L. From all the photos I've seen, most are noticeably larger than these. So I should upgrade?
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 10:49 AM   #14
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,987
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seb71 View Post
30L is the combined volume of his panniers. Each bag has 15L and I would not call 15L panniers as too big.
I know that 30L is the combined volume of his panniers. I didn't say they are too large but they are large(ish).
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 02:04 PM   #15
Seb71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Romania
Bikes:
Posts: 175
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think that the best way to get an answer is to put your gear inside your panniers and decide for yourself. For instance, some are using only a tarp as a shelter and others are using a 2 person 4-season tent. The needed volume is different for different people, as can be seen from the replies from this thread.
Seb71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 02:54 PM   #16
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seb71 View Post
I think that the best way to get an answer is to put your gear inside your panniers and decide for yourself. For instance, some are using only a tarp as a shelter and others are using a 2 person 4-season tent. The needed volume is different for different people, as can be seen from the replies from this thread.
Well, that's some good advice there. I suppose that really is the only way to find out. I do have a two person tent I'll be using, and have worked up a good packing list. I suppose I'll just have to pack it and see.
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 03:43 PM   #17
buelito
train safe
 
buelito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Reston, VA
Bikes:
Posts: 801
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
not having done much touring since the early 70's, I can only say things that are similar... If you are a backpacker, the larger the pack, the more you will carry, as you will tend to fill the pack. The same applies to panniers on a bike. Figure out what you need to carry, then re-analyze and THEN buy your bags. I am always amazed when I come back from a week long bike trip (where I don't carry y stuff on the bike), and realize how much I took with me that I never used. Obviously the weather is a big factor, as you need dry clothes to get into if you get wet, or ride wet; you need cold weather gear in some areas and so on.

train safe
buelito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 06:21 PM   #18
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,987
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 182 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by djyak View Post
Well, that's some good advice there. I suppose that really is the only way to find out. I do have a two person tent I'll be using, and have worked up a good packing list. I suppose I'll just have to pack it and see.
Don't waste pannier space on the tent or bag. Those go on the rack deck. Save your space in the bag for things that need to go in there.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 06:30 PM   #19
10 Wheels
Galveston County Texas
 
10 Wheels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: In The Wind
Bikes: 2010 Expedition, 03 GTO
Posts: 29,727
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 237 Post(s)
I liked having my 7x5 tent, rain fly, ground cloth in a front pannier.
Tent poles on the rear rack.
Air mattress, pillow, fan in the other front pannier
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Birth Place of Texas Ride April 2010 001.jpg (102.4 KB, 35 views)
File Type: jpg Birth Place of Texas Ride April 2010 031.jpg (101.6 KB, 24 views)
__________________
[SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI
10 Wheels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 08:05 PM   #20
Aushiker
Senior Member
 
Aushiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Fremantle, Western Australia
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Trucker, Salsa Mukluk, Giant Defy
Posts: 1,028
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
My vote is for Ortlieb panniers. I now have Ortlieb Sport-Packer Plus panniers but Ortlieb's Front-Roller Classic would do the trick I think. I have a review of the earlier version but it should give you an idea. Just one point to note, these panniers only have a capacity of 12.5 litres.



Andrew
Aushiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 09:23 PM   #21
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 19,767
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 477 Post(s)
those you got,+ maybe a stuff sack for Sleeping bag, top of rear rack..

then if you feel like adding 2 front bags, balance is improved..

Or just put the panniers on the front , big fluffy bag on the back rack.

Last edited by fietsbob; 02-12-12 at 09:29 PM.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-12, 11:31 PM   #22
Doug64
Senior Member
 
Doug64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Oregon
Bikes:
Posts: 3,907
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
My wife used a pair of Ortlieb Front Packer Pluses to ride across the country. She supplemented this with a small Ortlieb Rack Pack. Depending on your weight, 25 pounds on the rear of the bike may not affect handling at all. She has since switched to the Rear Packer Plus, for more capacity. Also depending on your load. the 30L bags should do fine for 2-4 days.



This was on a 3 week trip, including camping and cooking. We were using our lighter road bikes and relatively small capacity panniers. I doubt if either set had a capacity greater than 30 L. She had about 20 lbs of gear and I may have had 25-30 lbs.

Last edited by Doug64; 02-12-12 at 11:40 PM.
Doug64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-12, 05:28 AM   #23
djyak
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
djyak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Yuba City, CA
Bikes: Cannondale M300 mountain, '72 German Kurfalz touring
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Definetly feeling better now about my free panniers. I was worried I might now be able to use them. I laid out some of my gear last night, just to get a bit of a visual, it's still too cold here to do the touring I want, but from what I've laid out, I don't think I'll need to add front panniers, but will get a bar bag instead.
djyak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-12, 08:45 AM   #24
mtnbud
Senior Member
 
mtnbud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Salem Oregon
Bikes: 1986 Diamondback Ascent 1996 Klein Pulse Comp, 2006 Specialized Sequoia Elite
Posts: 480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by djyak View Post
Definetly feeling better now about my free panniers. I was worried I might now be able to use them. I laid out some of my gear last night, just to get a bit of a visual, it's still too cold here to do the touring I want, but from what I've laid out, I don't think I'll need to add front panniers, but will get a bar bag instead.
Excellent! A bar bag will be a great place for your photography equipment and other items for quick access.
mtnbud is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:20 PM.