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Old 02-12-12, 04:28 AM   #1
MichaelW
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Electric cooking stove !!!

It doesnt use electricity, it generates the stuff for charging phones etc.
Biolite.

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Old 02-12-12, 05:45 AM   #2
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What'll they think of next...
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Old 02-12-12, 06:27 AM   #3
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Ayup...reduce your carbon foot print...and just how do they calculate that?

Interesting concept though.

Aaron
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Old 02-12-12, 09:18 AM   #4
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pretty interesting.
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Old 02-12-12, 03:49 PM   #5
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The "environmentally friendly" angle is pretty silly. Wood smoke is terrible for your health and for the environment.
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Old 02-12-12, 04:29 PM   #6
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how many BTUs ? Adjustable flame, boil/simmer?
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Old 02-12-12, 05:18 PM   #7
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how many BTUs ? Adjustable flame, boil/simmer?
I bet it would work even better if it were designed to run on white gas or other usual camping fuel..
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Old 02-12-12, 05:42 PM   #8
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The "environmentally friendly" angle is pretty silly. Wood smoke is terrible for your health and for the environment.
Actually a twig picked up from the ground and burned efficiently in a device such as this will release the same amount of carbon into the air as allowing the twig to decompose thru rotting also an oxidation process. Burning twigs doesn’t involve cutting down trees and using petroleum products in doing such,so this device is a neutral device. If it works as advertised as a source of battery charging and then reduces dependency on throwaway batteries. It could be a positive on environmental impact. All devices have to also be measured on how much energy and pollution would go into building any energy saving device. Based on that this could actually be less polluting than a solar cell as they require a great deal of energy to produce some reports say solar cells take more energy to produce than they can produce in their life. Below are links explaining the basics of burning wood.
http://www.alternativeenergyprimer.com/Environmental-effects-of-wood-burning.html

http://www.ecofire.com/WoodBurning.htm
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Old 02-12-12, 05:44 PM   #9
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I'm waiting for a mini nuke battery for all your power needs.


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...ing-and-going/
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Old 02-12-12, 06:12 PM   #10
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I love the ingenuity. I'll be looking forward to seeing real-world (i.e. bicycle touring) results. My first take is: sooty pots may be a non-starter for some.
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Old 02-12-12, 06:45 PM   #11
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If your going wood, I would say go with the Sierra Stove Titanium version. But then again, it doesn't provide electrical power but it is more compact.

http://www.zzstove.com/sierratt.html
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Old 02-13-12, 09:19 AM   #12
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What do you do when all the available twigs are soaked? I also wonder about output and flame control.

I'll stick with my Dragonfly, its use of "heavy, expensive" White Gas not withstanding.
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Old 02-13-12, 09:45 AM   #13
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It doesnt use electricity, it generates the stuff for charging phones etc.
Biolite.
Interesting concept. However, this dry forest Colorado boy would have like to see a clearer space around an open burn stove in their video. Setting up an open burn in the middle of a pile of leaves is a good way of burning down thousands of acres of forest.

This also brings up the question of if the stove would be allowed in some western US forests during fire bans. This is an open flame and would have risk associated with it. Gas and liquid fuel stoves are allowed during fire bans but I doubt that you could use this kind of stove in those situations. Best to check before you shell out $130.
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Old 02-13-12, 09:47 AM   #14
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What do you do when all the available twigs are soaked?
Doritos. They burn really, really well with a cheery yellow glow.
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Old 02-13-12, 10:24 AM   #15
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You don’t have to spend $130 to burn some twigs. I have a DIY stove I made from a stainless mug from the dollar store. Drilled a row of holes around one side using the other side as a wind shield. I set my Pepsi can stove inside and the cups rim gives the space I need for a pot above to sit on. If I don’t use the pop can burner I can drop in a can of Sterno or some heat and a wick in an empty Sterno can or a couple charcoal bricks or twigs. Clear a good area down to dirt and cook there.

Yes you have to be careful with open flames and pick and choose when might be a good time and place for such. And yes sooty pans and pots, poor adjustment of temp etc. I think the selling point above is if you can get electricity out of heat with this then that’s something someone might want. I personally think this would be better if it rapidly charged a slow discharge battery pack. I don’t like the idea of plugging my iPhone directly into a fire burner. They show a LED light but I think I might like the light better after the fire is out.

And with any fire have your water handy in case you have a problem. And follow posted guidelines always with regards to fire.
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Old 02-13-12, 11:02 AM   #16
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I took care of the Sooty pot issue, sandblasted the bottom,
and sprayed black high temperature Auto exhaust header paint on,
black improves heat absorption ..

back in the Scouts we used #10 cans, and had a sewn trouser leg cover
to keep the other stuff in the pack cleaner.
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Old 02-13-12, 03:07 PM   #17
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Ayup...reduce your carbon foot print...and just how do they calculate that?

Interesting concept though.

Aaron
A carbon footprint is based on the fossil carbon used. Wood and other biomass that has been growing relatively recently utilizes the carbon that is part of the natural carbon cycle of the planet. It's on a very short rotation, geologically speaking. Even if you were to burn wood that is a thousand years old, it wouldn't have much impact on the carbon cycle of the planet. Only when you dig up vast quantities of carbon that have been out of the carbon cycle for millions of years, do you start messing with the system.

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You don't have to spend $130 to burn some twigs.
The point isn't burning of the wood but the electrical generation from burning the wood. You can't get that from just any old stove.

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Yes you have to be careful with open flames and pick and choose when might be a good time and place for such. [/FONT][/SIZE]
First, their video shows some irresponsible behavior with regards to an open burn. I'd even have some problems with a liquid fuel stove used in the middle of a pile of aspen leaves. Secondly, the rules of using open fires here in Colorado aren't all that clear. During a fire ban, you can burn liquid or gaseous fuels and you might be allowed to burn wood in an open fire in an established fire pit...i.e. not a ring of rocks... although in severe conditions even burning in a fire pit may be banned. At that point, you might not be able to use this kind of stove because it is an open fire. Just sayin' you might have trouble with a Forest Ranger.
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Old 02-14-12, 01:01 AM   #18
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All very good points. I have lots of Ultra Light Weight hiking equipment. I have several stoves and I have researched just about every know stove (I think). I actually own:

1. Coleman Fyrestorm Titanium: http://www.coleman.com/coleman/Colem...ct_id=9770-A25
2. Snowpeak GigaPower SS version (manual): http://www.snowpeak.com/stoves/backp...ve-gs-100.html
3. Vargo Triad Titanium Alcohol Stove: http://www.campmor.com/vargo-triad-t...ci_kw={keyword**
4: And a Coleman Model 5438 (had to mention it)

They all play a part and can be used in a variety of situations. For instance, you wouldn't want to use the GigaPower under windy situations because when you use a wind screen around it, it can build up heat and cause an explosion since the stove sits directly on top of the isopropane/butane fuel. The Fyrestorm has a braided line separating it from the stove hence safely using a wind screen around the burner. The Fyrestorm can also use gasoline or white gas (Coleman fuel). The Vargo is small and light for ultralight backpacking and is tough since its made of out titanium. Cokecan stoves are cheap yes, but they are aluminum and only last so long. Yes you can easily make another one........and back and forth but its a nice stove. The fuel is fairly common, Methanol or "HEET" and is found in most gas stations. Isopropane/Butane is expensive and can become costly if you are on an extended tour/hike. You can run pure Ethanol in there but I wouldn't want to burn my EverClear in it.


If you choose to get the Sierra Stove then you could burn wood. Yes it's hard to get wet wood going unless you have some solid fuel tablets. Then its like a little blast furnace since it uses a little battery and fan setup.

Sierra Stove: http://www.zzstove.com/mcart/
Solid Fuel tabs (good blog about them) http://www.wilderness-survival.net/f...inder-amp-fuel

If you still want to go with wood and be even lighter then you can use a Vargo Titanium Hexagon Wood Stove: http://www.backpacker.com/gear-revie...ove/gear/14993 These aren't as easy to get going or keep going since there isn't a fan to help burn the wood from under the stove but it does create an updraft in its design (from what I understand).

There are many things to consider when choosing which one to cook with/carry/use/pack/purchase.....Are you just heating up water (boiling) or are you needing to control your flame for actual cooking? Are you at altitude? Is there a fire ban in the area? Are you going lightweight? How far between replentishment stops? What type of area are you going to be traveling through? Jungle, desert, woodland? Will you be packing water with you or are you going to be filtereing along the way? Soooo many things to consider that I may carry one or all of my stoves at any given time (Except the Coleman 5438 ).

Another good site: http://www.torontocycles.com/Selling/Vargo.html

Anyway, I hope this helps some......

Last edited by IndianaShawn; 02-14-12 at 01:53 AM. Reason: Adding a cycling link
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Old 02-14-12, 01:32 AM   #19
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I'm waiting for a mini nuke battery for all your power needs.


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80...ing-and-going/

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Old 02-14-12, 05:19 AM   #20
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I think the Biolite Camp Stove was a money making spinoff from the larger and more useful Homestove. The Homestove is designed for developing-world, family homes, where wood has to be collected and is in short supply and smoke is a major health risk. It uses 1/2 the fuel and produces 10% of the smoke of a typical cooking fire.

If you use this together with a solar cooker where possible, you could really cut down your fuel, which you have to collect from endangered forests and carry home.
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Old 02-14-12, 10:00 AM   #21
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What do you do when all the available twigs are soaked? I also wonder about output and flame control.
Zip stoves can burn wet wood just fine, you just need a little dry kindling to get the fire lit. The fire gets as hot as the high setting on my gas stove at home. You can also adjust the flame down lower by turning off the fan or adding a little less wood. From the web site, it appears that the BioLite is a Zip stove with a novel way to power its fan, so I expect it would cook as well as the Sierra Zip.
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