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  1. #1
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
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    Please comment on my gear list.

    I am going on a long trip in a few months. Will leave here (China) on July 3, and ride to Turkey and maybe on to London. It should take 7 to 11 months. I have never ridden anywhere near this far before. Here is my gear list....

    Bike: Surly Long Haul Trucker, factory built 2010 version
    Seat: Brooks B17 seat. I did about 13,000 km on this seat, mostly commuting in Chengdu. It is well broken in, and not sagging.
    Handlebars: Nitto butterfly handlebars

    Shifters: Deore STI shifters, and this meant I needed to change the front derailleur as well.
    Cables: Jagwire
    Rear Derailleur: Shimano XT RD-M771SGS top-normal long cage
    Front Derailleur: Shimano FD-R443

    Front crankset: Andel Forged arms. Silver. Aluminum rings, 110mm BCD, 48-36-26t
    Cassette: Shimano CS-HG50. 9-speed. 11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-34t
    Chain: SRAM PC971 9-speed

    Hubs: Shimano XT
    Rims: AlexRims Adventurer
    Spokes Swiss DT Champion
    Tyres: Schwalbe Marathon XRs. I have a couple of spare Schwalbe Marathon Mondials in my bags as well.

    Front and rear guards: Cheap but strong ones from Taobao

    Front rack: Tubus Ergo
    Rear rack: Tubus Cargo

    Rear Panniers: Ortlieb Back-Roller Classic, black
    Front Panniers: Ortlieb Front-Roller Plus
    Handlebar bag: Ortlieb Ultimate 5 plus
    Rack bag: Ortlieb Rack Pack XL

    Speedo: Topeak Comp 130
    GPS: Garmin Edge 700

    Bottle Cages: Topeak 1.5 litre cages, two of them, inside the frame and a smaller one for under the frame.

    Spares
    2 Tubes
    2 Tyres Schwalbe Marathon Mondial
    1 Chain
    1 Rear Cassette
    1 Brake pads set
    2 Brake cables
    2 Gear cables
    4 Chain Links
    6 Spokes
    2 Brake bolts
    2 Brake cable bolts
    2 Crank bolts
    6 rack bolts
    2 drink holder bolts

    Tools

    24 Patches
    3 Glue tubes
    3 Tyre levers
    1 Pump Topeak Road Morph
    1 Set of Allen Keys
    1 Cone spanner
    1 Spanner (cone nut)
    1 Chain breaker
    1 Cassette removal tool
    1 Chain whip
    10 Large zip ties
    10 Small zip ties
    1 Needlenose Pliers
    1 Proofide
    Duct tape

    Clothes
    3 Bike shorts
    1 Long bike pants
    3 Short sleeved shirt
    2 Long sleeved shirts
    4 Pair socks
    4 Pair thick socks
    1 Shoes
    1 Sandals
    1 Black fleece hoodie
    1 Down Jacket
    1 Gortex
    2 Zip off pants
    2 t-shirts
    1 hat
    1 sunglasses
    1 Pair of short gloves
    1 Pair of long gloves
    1 Beanie
    2 Neck mufflers
    6 Underpants

    Camping Gear
    1 Tent Sierra designs vaporlite
    1 Thermarest
    1 Kathmandu -10 Down bag
    1 Kathmandu Sleeping bag silk inner
    1 Head torch
    1 Under tent sheet
    1 Sitting on tarp
    1 Rope
    1 Soap
    1 Scrubber
    1 Tootbrush
    1 Toilet paper
    1 Trowel

    Cooking Gear
    2 Pots
    1 Frying Pan
    1 Whisperlite
    1 Fuel bottle
    1 Fork
    1 Knive
    1 Spoon
    1 Cup
    1 Coffee machine
    1 Coffee container
    1 Box for spices
    5 Spice jars
    1 Cutting board
    1 Swiss army knife

    Electronics To keep my inner geek happy on the road
    1 Camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS10
    1 Camera Charger
    2 Spare Camera battery
    3 SD cards
    1 SD Card reader
    1 Phone
    1 Phone cable
    1 iPod 120 Gb
    1 Netbook
    1 Netbook cable
    1 External HD Backup of music, books, photos
    1 GPS
    1 GPS cable
    1 Solar battery charger
    1 Headphones
    2 Headphone cables
    5 Headphone foamies
    1 Kindle
    3 Pelican cases, iPod and external HD in one, iPhone in another, camera in another.
    1 Dry bag, for Netbook and Kindle. Not worried about them getting wet, but the air bag provides padding.

    Documents
    1 Passport
    1 Credit card
    2 Bank Cards
    10 Passport photos

    Miscellanous
    Small backpack for going around towns and cities
    Money belt
    Needle thread package
    First Aid kit, bandages, sling, idodine, safety pins, antibiotics.
    Notebook
    Pencils
    Business cards
    Sunscreen
    Magnifying glass
    Binoculars

    Kitchen Sink.
    Last edited by azesty; 02-25-12 at 06:58 PM.

  2. #2
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    Well, since you're carrying it all, I don't have an issue with it.

    You just have sooo many duplicates of items its just crazy. If you have an iPhone, then why a ipod & Kindle. Why a netbook with iphone/kindle/etc. why 2 pots & frypan. Why are you carrying basicly an entire another bike in spare parts. Why so many shorts/pants/

    Have you weighed this entire household? I shutter to think what this totals up to.
    Last edited by VT_Speed_TR; 02-24-12 at 07:37 PM.
    1965 Moulton Speed 4, 1974 Fuji 12 speed, 1987 DB Ascent EX, 2006 Dahon Speed TR, 2009 Salsa Fargo, 2011 Gravity 29.4, 2011 Salsa Casseroll, 2012 Surly Moonlander

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chris Pringle's Avatar
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    Wow! Sounds like you are ready to go. How many Lbs./Kgs. is this? I would personally consolidate or eliminate some of the electronics. Binoculars? Are you very much into bird-watching or something? I'm curious to know your specs for crankset and cassette, which you do not mention. I would also suggest you do a one week trip somewhere (with this same exact list) before your big departure. Once you start crossing borders shipping things back home becomes quite expensive.
    Handcrafted panniers and bags for the discerning cyclist


  4. #4
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    When I look at lists like this, I never see a boot/tape for repairing a tire blow out. It rarely happens, but when it does, unless you're hauling a spare tire, can be a show stopper. A Park Tool boot and some Gorilla Tape(very tough stuff) takes up little space, weighs an ounce, and delivers a ton in piece of mind.

    Used it once to repair a Marathon touring tire on a friend's bike.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  5. #5
    Member Perigee's Avatar
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    azesty,
    The only things I didn't see on your list is bug repellent, a lock and cable, and some water purification tablets. I would like to see a picture of all this gear loaded onto the bike. My loaded touring bike weighed 100 lbs and I was carrying way less than you are for my 6 month tour. Also, what are you carrying for protection other than the Swiss Army Knife? Some of the areas that you are riding through may not be very friendly.

  6. #6
    sth
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    I would say lighten where you have multiples. IE:
    1 spare tire
    no spare chain
    one spare cable
    glueless patches
    rather than a roll of duct tape, wrap a length of it around things like bottles etc
    one or 2 bikes shorts vs 3
    1 shirt each of long sleeve and short
    less socks
    1 or 2 prs of undies
    1 pr convertible pants
    coffee machine?
    pick one or two seasonings, not 5
    no cutting board
    pair down the electronics
    magnifying glass?

    It is tough pairing down. As with hiking, lay it all out on the floor and turf half of it. More than the weight of it all is the space needed to carry it all. Be brutal and ask yourself if really need it.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
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    A lot of stuff. Put it all in a pile (assuming you have purchased it all!!) Then start removing stuff into another pile. Then um and err and put it back. Repeat ad nauseam. I was really grateful that I carried my heavier duty jacket even though I initially put it in the Reject pile.

    Spares
    2 Tubes: I would take 3 tubes for a trip like this.

    6 rack bolts
    2 drink holder bolts
    ----- I make sure that the bottle cage bolts are the same length as rack bolts so I can switch them over. I like my rack bolts a bit longer than normal (limited by chain clearance) and the end slotted for a screwdriver to ease removal.

    .......................
    1 Chain breaker: Do you use a bike multitool with one included?
    1 Cassette removal tool
    1 Chain whip
    A roadside cassette removal tool like NBT2 will eliminate the chain whip. You MUST remove the cassette with a proper tool before using the NBT2 for the 1st time, it cant remove a tight cassette. I tighten the lockring with a stubby wrench (cooltool) to about 6/7 clicks.
    ................
    1 Needlenose Pliers
    Can you take a decent multitool with a metal file for general utility.
    ..............
    Duct tape
    2m wrapped around a pencil.
    + Nylon patching fabric for tent/bag/clothes etc., about 30x30cm
    ...............
    Clothes

    1 Black fleece hoodie
    1 Down Jacket
    Fleece is bulky and heavy to pack. I prefer a synthetic thin padded jacket style.
    Down may be OK for central asia nights.
    ..........
    2 Zip off pants
    Too many. 1 zipoffs. Take 1 overpants in Pertex or breathable w/proof for really cold conditions.
    ............
    2 t-shirts
    You can ride in T shirts. Combine with yr 3 short sleeved jersies: 5 garments.
    I take 2 Merino T shirts and 1/2 cycling jersies.
    .............
    6 Underpants
    Take 3 minimalist slip style in polycotton for quick drying.

    What about a towel, med/large microfibre.
    .......................
    Camping Gear

    1 Sitting on tarp
    I like the versatility of a 3/4 length thermarest style plus a 1/3 length closed cell foam mat. I use the mat to sit on, insulating me from the ground. I also sleep on it at the foot end. When your thermarest springs a leak, you can sleep on the small mat.
    A small extra tarp (2x2m) is good for cooking under if your tent is too small. Rig as a vestibule extension.

    1 Rope
    You need something to put over your shoulder so you can haul the bike up v steep rough trails. A length of webbing may be better Can you adapt the ortleib shoulder straps for this?. 10m parachord is always useful. You dont need 20m climbing rope.
    Bungie chords or old inner tubes for strapping stuff to rack top.
    1 Soap
    All purpose body/hair/dishwashing mountain suds.

    Nailclippers?
    ................
    1 Trowel
    Can be very minimalist and light.
    .........................
    Cooking Gear
    1 Box for spices Waterproof tupperware style boxes of various sizes.
    1 Cutting board. Thin flexible kind takes up no space, gives you large food prep surface, you can use on your rear rack if needed.

    1 Swiss army knife
    Difficult to clean off food, hygene risk. I took a Kuhn Rikon paring knife in yellow with plastic blade protector. Small size,low weight, big utility and easy to clean. Also usable in defence in extremis.
    Downsize the Swiss army knife to scissors/small blade style. Do you need corkscrew?

    V small wooden spoon is good for cooking and eating. i found it more useful than a metal or plastic one.
    Plunger type pepper mill.
    ...........................
    Electronics To keep my inner geek happy on the road
    3 SD cards

    1 Dry bag, for Netbook and Kindle. Not worried about them getting wet, but the air bag provides padding.
    ...

    You may not need drybags with ortleibs but they are useful, esp inside the tent for organising stuff. You dont want dirty panniers inside the sleeping area.
    Transparent map holder or large, tough, clear plastic bag for local paper maps.

    Battery management issues. Try and standardise on battery types so you can switch them. I know this is really hard to do. Also, use devices with direct USB recharging socket and a solar charger with a USB power output.
    Too much computing power/duplication.
    Not enough SD card. Take more, switch them around so if one fails you dont loose everything. They are the one irreplaceable item you carry. Ever other part of you kit can be purchased again, but not your photos.
    .................................
    Documents
    1 Passport
    1 Credit card
    2 Bank Cards
    10 Passport photos

    driving licence, Youth Hostel Association card, Insurance docs, Contact information sheet on paper.
    small photocopies sealed in plastic distributed around in case stuff gets stolen.
    Small family/dog/girlfriend/hot chick photo on paper.
    ......................

    Miscellanous
    Small backpack for going around towns and cities
    V useful. Use unpadded stuffsac style can double up as pillow.

    Money belt. I prefer neck holder for passport, some cards and money. A normal looking webbing belt with moneybelt feature is good.

    Lipsalve.


    You can get a monocular/microscope style thing for wildlife.
    Silva compass has a magnifying glass.
    In the UK we always keep an emergency whistle on our Silva compass string.

    "Everything you have gets stolen" procedure: Dont worry, you can replace it all as long as you are in one piece.
    Make a list of useful info in a text file. Use a simple, basic encryption to conceal stuff like credit card account no (conceal the format by adding extra stuff to the beginning to fool sniffing programs). Put on email. Do not send. Save as draft.
    You now know your insurance and credit card contact details, embassy phone numbers, passport number, and can resume your life.

  8. #8
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    Have you loaded the bike yet with all the stuff?

    What you are planning is really adventurous and the only other person on here that I can think has done similar sorts of rides is mev, so it might be worth checking out his packing lists to see where you can pare yours down, perhaps. Weight is a key factor because it will increase wear and tear on the bike and you. Volume, as alluded to in another post, will also be a factor, and that's why I've asked if you have loaded the bike with the stuff yet.

    I supposed it does come down to how secure you want to feel in what will be very remote regions (something that perhaps other posters haven't quite grasped). Hence your need to carry spares such as the cassette. And the clothing is another conundrum, because I know that the weather can vary so vastly across the region.

    I think as to the bike maintenance, look at the conditions you have commuted under. You say the Brooks has done around 13,000km, which falls in the distance you plan to ride on this tour (I think). Look back at what you have had to replace on whatever the bike was you rode over that distance and extrapolate from there.

    I would have concerns about the Alex rims. As far as I am concerned, Alex doesn't have a particularly good reputation. And I note that you haven't included spare spokes on your list. If you go with the Alex rims, get the OEM spokes replaced with DT Swiss ones if you can. You have bolts which you shouldn't need if you use Loctite 242 judiciously over the bike, but not spokes. Does your cone spanner fit both front and rear cone nuts? How robust is your bottom bracket (ie, are the bearings internal or external) and maybe you might need a tool for that. What pedals?

    As to clothing, you do seem a bit overloaded with stuff that weighs more and takes up extra space. The extra thick socks seem a bit much, especially if you were to go with mid-weight wool socks as your based pairs. And six pairs of underpants -- why? I don't have a problem with the three pairs of bike shorts, but you might consider opting for one pair of padded shorts and a couple of pairs of unpadded compression shorts -- they take up less space, and your butt should be acclimatised to the Brooks so you don't needed padded ones. As to shirts, you also seem to have a lot of them... I would ditch the T-shirts, provided the on-bike shirts are practical enough to wear off the bike in the typical social environments you may experience (ie, plain colour and loose cut).

    Use your tent footprint as the sit-on tarp; no point in taking two things when one can do double duty. As far as a cutting board, cut out the bottom of a round plastic cannister and use that -- it should be of a size to fit in your frying pan. Put your spices into ziploc plastic bags; there is no point in carrying the extra weight of jars if you don't need to.

    I am scratching my head about the "coffee machine". There are plastic devices that sit on cups with filter paper to drip your coffee through so you shouldn't need a percolator or similar.

    Personally, I think you need to reconsider the electronic equipment you want to take. It all runs on batteries, and unless your solar charger is up to the task (which I seriously doubt), you will be short on power for much of your trip if you aren't able to locate suitable power sources along the way.

    I'd seriously look at getting a second credit card (even if you have to open an account at another financial institution) and keep it and the second bank card secure elsewhere from your wallet or money belt (maybe in under the insole of your shoe -- and I am serious). A lone traveller losing a CC and/or bank card either through misplacement or theft is in trouble. I lost my wallet at Christmas in Mt Gambier and if Machka hadn't been with me, I would have been in a pickle money-wise.

    You don't make any mention of lights for the bike. I would definitely get a couple of powerful LED rear lights, and one for the front, preferably two with one having a strong flash. You will be out at night at some stage and will need them to be seen as much as to see by.

    I'd also ensure I had some paperwork to prove that your bike belongs to you, even if it is a fake receipt.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  9. #9
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Good list OP, I would add two more spare tubes.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
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  10. #10
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
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    First, thank you all for your comments. I had some trouble getting to sleep last night thinking about this

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Pringle View Post
    Wow! Sounds like you are ready to go. How many Lbs./Kgs. is this? I would personally consolidate or eliminate some of the electronics. Binoculars? Are you very much into bird-watching or something? I'm curious to know your specs for crankset and cassette, which you do not mention. I would also suggest you do a one week trip somewhere (with this same exact list) before your big departure. Once you start crossing borders shipping things back home becomes quite expensive.
    Not sure about the weight, but have done a couple of short tours with friends on not good bikes where I have carried all their stuff as well as much of this.

    Yes, into bird watching, and astronomy, and have spend the last 5 years living in big cities unable to see the stars. Phone battery doesnt last long enough to read on, so the kindle is needed.

    Added the information about the drivechain/crankset.

    Wont be able to do a one week tour, I finish work on the 30th of June, and my visa will expire on the 31st of August, it is a long way to Kyrgystan from here, about 2300 km, and it will be very very hot.

    Home is here, but when I leave there wont be a home besides my bike. That will hold all my posssesions. No shipping home will happen.



    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Pringle
    When I look at lists like this, I never see a boot/tape for repairing a tire blow out
    Two spare tyres.

    Quote Originally Posted by Perigee
    The only things I didn't see on your list is bug repellent, a lock and cable, and some water purification tablets.
    Thanks, bug repellent is important. I will have a lock and am thinking about a water purifier, and iodine tabs.

    Quote Originally Posted by sth
    no spare chain
    Not sure you appreciate where I am going. I may find a couple of good bicycle shops between here and Turkey, or I may not. The chances of finding shops with 9 speed chains are not good. The trip to Turkey is about 14,000 km. One chain will not do.

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    So much good advice!!!!
    Tubes, yes, 3
    Like the bolts idea, but they are so small that a couple of extra make no difference. Not sure how many I could buy between here and Turkey.

    Will look at a good multitool. Can you recommend one?

    Fleece/down. My plan is to ride from here to Qinghai province and ride through there for about 1000 km. It is high, doesnt go below 3000 m, and there will be a few 4000 m + passes, one I think is about 4600 m. It will be cold up there. However, there is trouble there at the moment, which may not finish before I get there. This means I will need to be down on the flat, at about 500 m and it will be very hot. Many days over 40 C. I will also be crossing a depression in a desert, -50 m, in 50 C temps. By the time I get to Tajikistan where there are more 4000 m + passes, it will be into September, and the chance of real cold starts to become enough to constitute danger.

    Towel! I have a purple cheesecloth like sarong I bought in India about 10 years ago. I have owned it longer than anything I currently have. I will take that for a towel. It is light, and dries so quickly.

    I like the pannier strap hauling idea, thanks for that!

    I dont use nailclippers, I just pick except for one on a finger that got a little too close to an electric bench plain. That nail still grows funny. Will have to take some small scissors for that one.

    Dont need a corkscrew.

    I have a couple of email tricks for storing that information too. Has never made a difference, but it is always good to know it is there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    I am scratching my head about the "coffee machine".
    I found one on Taobao that makes an espresso shot and only weighs about 150 g. Cant find it at the moment, will post it later.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    It all runs on batteries, and unless your solar charger is up to the task (which I seriously doubt), you will be short on power for much of your trip
    The two things from the electronics that will be used heavily while I am away from power are the Kindle and the iPod. The Kindle will run for many weeks, and I doubt that I will be away from power for longer than that. The other is the iPod, I really like listening to music while I ride. My small solar charger/battery should be able to keep that going, along with its initial charge, for a week. If it dies, so be it.

    Camera isnt that tough on batteries, but maybe another would be good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan
    Spokes and rims
    Yeah, my back wheel is my biggest worry. It comes with DT Swiss 14g stainless spokes, but the XT hub has had a bit of criticism. I can pull the rest of the bike down to ball bearings, and put it together again. But I have never built a back wheel. I have had problems finding people to build good wheels here. However there will be a new bike shop opening soon, and friends of mine tell me this guy is great. I will see about changing out the back wheel, hub and rim.


    Working on the credit card.

    Again, thank you all for your comments, they have been most helpful.

    I have a crazyguyonabike journal for this trip here:

    http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?doc_id=9796

    and you can see a couple of the other short trips I have made there too.

    z
    Last edited by azesty; 02-25-12 at 07:02 PM.

  11. #11
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    I would add an extra tube as some else said. Good luck on your trip OP. I was wanting to do the same, but because this will be my first trip, I am just going to do Korea and Japan. I am starting the same time as you it seems. Good luck!

  12. #12
    Senior Member shipwreck's Avatar
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    I have found that the topeak 1.5 L cages can vibrate a lot on rough roads, leading one to fatigue and break on me, and I have done nothing like the roads you may be on for that distance.

    So I ziptie the top of the cage, were the height adjuster and strap are, to the frame. That stopped the vibration, but made it hard to change the height for different bottles.
    And, that rubber strap they come with is a really weak point. be prepared to use a rubber band or something when that breaks.

    Good luck on your tour!

  13. #13
    djb
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    I too wonder about the total weight. sleisure or tiredofit fellow writes on his webpage of crossing Canada on a LHT with a really heavy load, I forget but I think it was between 75-100lbs. really heavy. You could check out his tiredofit website and read up on that part of his cycling history (he is in Africa right now on a diff bike). Personally I find your list rather daunting, and despite not haven undertaken a trip as long and isolated as this, it does seem to be a heck of a lot of stuff (or rather weight I should say)

    you could also check out other really long distance trips on CGOAB to compare lists and such, and/or even contact directly some journal writers with specific questions.

    I recall that the family that went from Alaska to the bottom of S America had some issues with the fathers bikes sti brifters at one point, most likely from accumulated dust and grit inside. If you do stay with sti shifters, some sort of spray lubricant like wd-40 or jigg-a-loo sprayed into the innards would help with less gumming up of the innards if you are in really tough, dusty dusty conditions. (for a trip like this, as much as I love sti shifters, I'd be hesitant with them in the sort of areas you will be in--its very easy for someone like me to give out armchair advice, so Id mine crazyguy for real experience with a long trip like this.)

    all the best with planning.

  14. #14
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Load up your bicycle with all that stuff ... and spend a day climbing hills.

    Then decide if you want to keep all of that, or get rid of some of it.


    You made the comment that: Home is here, but when I leave there wont be a home besides my bike. That will hold all my posssesions. No shipping home will happen."

    You'll be crossing several borders. What are you doing about the requirement to produce a permanent address at many of these border crossings in order to prove that you have no intention of staying and trying to get work in that country?

    Also, have you settled your insurance?

    And, as Rowan mentions, do you have a receipt for your bicycle or some other proof of where you purchased it and that it is yours?

  15. #15
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
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    I have an Australian drivers license with an address. I doubt they are going to go there and check

    Havent worked on insurance yet, but know where I will get it from.

    Dont have a receipt for the bike, but will get some Chinese receipt that will cover it

    z

  16. #16
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    Load up your bicycle with all that stuff ... and spend a day climbing hills.

    Then decide if you want to keep all of that, or get rid of some of it.
    this is really the most important suggestion here, you have to pack this all up (and add some more weight for extra water and food you will have to carry at some points) and actually see if you think after a days ride with lots of hills, "ok , this is doable" or "holy crap, I need to take 10 or 20lbs off this..."

  17. #17
    Senior Member Chris Pringle's Avatar
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    In regard with your small chainring, I would swap the 26t chainring for a 22t. Given the weight and terrain you'll be covering, you'll definitely need it. Your legs will thank you. I met this guy several years ago touring off-road in Colorado with tons of weight in his panniers while crossing very mountainous terrain. A few days into his tour he came down with tendonitis in the knee. He had to quit his tour as this takes several weeks to recover.

  18. #18
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
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    I should add that I have been a regular commuter for the last three years, racking up 16,000 km in the last three years. My daily ride is a 12.5 km sprint, that I generally average 30 kmph, up to 33 kmph. I am in pretty good shape for an old guy.

    I have most of the equipment now, but still have to think about water, and how I am going to deal with bad water. I am not sure I want to be using that much iodine.

    Anyboy have a suggestion for a good water filter?

    z

  19. #19
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VT_Speed_TR View Post
    Well, since you're carrying it all, I don't have an issue with it.
    Me either. You have more than twice what I would take. Less clothes, more stops. Less spare everything. I understand being prepared, but the more I do this the less I carry. Unless you plan on weeks at a time without human contact, you can probably get by with half or less of what you have.

    Marc
    Read Simply Cycle

    "I can still do everything I used to, but now I'm mature enough to take a nap without being told." - Me

    "You don't deteriorate from age,you age from deterioration" --Joe Weider

  20. #20
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
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    A bicycle trip? I thought you were moving!

    OK Seriously - here's a suggestion that should cut your weight in half. Keep the list as is and identify some advance areas where you can pick up some of the stuff on that list as you travel. Its impossible that you'll need or use all of in the first five days so set up a list of priorities based on immediate useage and make plans to acquire some functional souveniers later on. Make a list of things you can DISGARD and replace as you go along. Like socks. They won't last months.

    Also suggest you ditch the frying pan. Aside from open frying using a lot more fuel, you can fry in a pot - you can't make a stew in a frying pan. Same for the coffee pot. Eating in the street is a better bet when you can, cheaper and will save clean-up, cooking and shopping time. If and when you must cook, the most functional cooking utensil for a single burner is a tall pot with a cover to keep heat from escaping. Thats either an asparagus cooker or a set of stacking stainless steel pots as is common in Thailand. http://www.zebra-head.com/en/product...yid=0000000003

    Keep in mind that fresh produce has a life expectancy of HOURS without refrigeration. Proper nutritien WILL be an issue. Suggest you bring some high protein meal replacements in powder form as a backup and plan on replentishing them ocassionally.

    And try to kill some redundant items. Most cameras will double as a card reader for example. Bringing a phone AND an iPod AND a Kindle AND an external HD plus all supporting cables seems a bit much. What do you need all that seperate storage for?

    But I would suggest you add ZipLocks in a variety of sizes. They can do everything from keeping your food fresh to keeping not so fresh socks and underwear away from everything else.
    Last edited by Burton; 03-06-12 at 07:11 PM.

  21. #21
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    Me either. You have more than twice what I would take. Less clothes, more stops. Less spare everything. I understand being prepared, but the more I do this the less I carry. Unless you plan on weeks at a time without human contact, you can probably get by with half or less of what you have.

    Marc
    Did you read the OP's first paragraph?

  22. #22
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Older steel axle XT is more commonplace to repair [10x1 mm] than the new alloy one.

    ride the kit around, locally for a week, so you save on mailing stuff back..
    by dropping it off at home..

    coffee machine?

    do you have someone to send mail drops ahead
    so you don't need to carry all your extra spares from day one?
    Last edited by fietsbob; 03-06-12 at 07:32 PM.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Newspaperguy's Avatar
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    That's a lot of stuff. Wow.

    I'm thinking about what it would mean to try to carry all that on my bike. It may be worth swapping the racks and panniers for a decent trailer. A Burley will give you a lot of carrying capacity.

    The list of parts has me a bit concerned. Is it really necessary? Perhaps it depends on the route, but there are a lot of populated areas along the way from China to Turkey. Would it be possible to get to the nearest town of decent size and get the required parts for repair from the bike shop or through the mail? I don't know the bike culture along the proposed route, so maybe each spare part truly is necessary.

    I'm also wondering why two pots and a frying pan? Why not one pot and an optional frying pan?

    The electronics could be streamlined too.

    Still, every one of us has a unique touring style. Mine isn't what someone else would prefer.
    Life is good.

  24. #24
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    Machka and I attended a presentation at a Bicycle Tasmania meeting of a couple who rode through Mongolia, and trust me on this, the gear list that azesty has put up would not be out of order if his route is through similar country. It can be very remote and very rustic.

    However, I would leave behind the Proofide. In hot weather, it does liquify, and if it leaks, it will stink out whatever is touches. I am sure there is plenty of yak or goat fat along the way that can be put to use on the Brooks.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  25. #25
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
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    I have been trying to find a way to share GoogleEarth tracks, but cant. Ridewithgps, where I have the planned route is blocked here and I am having vpn problems as well so I cant use that either, though that is where I made the following images

    So I have added a couple of images of where I plan to ride.

    This is the route through China







    This might give you some idea of the remote parts... this is not the crowded east coast, but the high empty western parts. Until I get to Xining, at the point of the dogleg on the second image, about 1500 km, I doubt I will see a bike shop, let alone one that will have parts for a bike that wasnt built before the end of the cultural revolution.

    After that, between Huaxi and Turpan, while I will be on a main road, there is very very little in the way of habitation. I looked at a few routes through more remote areas, but there seems to be no water at all, let alone food.

    That gets me to the Kyrgystan border.

    I have thought long and hard about a trailer. I toured with a trailer in Australia once and did like it. There is even a bob trailer for sale in a shop nearby....

    <edit>
    Damn, they got resized I think, so here are links to the originals...

    http://i.imgur.com/GuRAJ.jpg
    http://i.imgur.com/8RRjK.jpg
    http://i.imgur.com/nRoGM.jpg
    http://i.imgur.com/8jGAZ.jpg
    http://i.imgur.com/HwvLr.jpg

    </edit>


    z

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