Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 29
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Why wouldn't I tour on Open Pros?

    Looking to build up a dynamo equipped wheelset for my touring bike and I can't decide on rims. There's plenty of bombproof options around, but I'm wondering if most of them aren't over-egging it.

    I regularly see posts from clydes weighing 220 pounds (or more) espousing the strength of Open Pros. Given I only weigh 180 I figure I would have a bit of breathing room in terms of luggage.

    I have that would be mostly described as ultralight gear, and I can't see wanting more than 20 pounds on the rear (I prefer putting as much up front anyways).

    So, now's your chance to convince me the weight of something like A719s are worth it.

    Cheers, Lachlan

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,410
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No reason to convince you of anything. If you want Open Pro wheels go for it. What weight of tire do you plan on using?

    You might consider the reason people "over-egg" on wheels is that there isn't a spare set of wheels available at the end of the days ride. If something happens to your wheels you don't ride the next day and drive to the bike shop for a replacement. If something happens to your touring wheels you don't ride. Now if you're argument is that a Open Pro is just as durable as a 565g 719 one might as well ask if they're overbuilding 435g Open Pros.
    Last edited by LeeG; 05-02-12 at 08:32 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,041
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only issue I could see with Open Pro's and touring, is what tire width you intend to use, I've used Open Pros with 23 & 25mm tires, should work with 28mm fine, but would look at a wider rim if using a wider tire. i.e. with 37mm tires, I'm using DTSwiss TK 7.1's which are about 5mm wider than the Open Pros.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Middle Earth (aka IA)
    My Bikes
    A lot of old bikes and a few new ones
    Posts
    6,598
    Mentioned
    56 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I'm skeptical about using open pros for bike touring or I should say, I wouldn't do it. Get the mavic A719 which weigh around 130 more grams per rim. They will hold up a lot better than the open pros. Plus I'd get them in 36 hole. You are not going all that fast when touring to begin with but you are weighed down so you are much better off having rims that will get you to where you are going.

    Edit: I'm not sure you need convincing since it seems as if you have made up your mind. All I can say is that I've done a fair amount of touring and there is nothing worse than being far from anywhere with a bike that is not working.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Middle Earth (aka IA)
    My Bikes
    A lot of old bikes and a few new ones
    Posts
    6,598
    Mentioned
    56 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    By the way, you should think about why touring is different (and harder on wheels). The rider can and does get his butt off the bike when he/she hits a bump which makes a life a lot easier on the wheels. If you have 30 or so pounds of extra weight (assuming that we are talking about full on touring with tent, sleeping bag, etc), the wheels have to be able to hold up with the extra weight. So the OP is mistaken, I think, to focus only on his weight in trying to guess-estimate whether the open pros will hold up for touring or not.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,295
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by lachy94 View Post
    I regularly see posts from clydes weighing 220 pounds (or more) espousing the strength of Open Pros. Given I only weigh 180 I figure I would have a bit of breathing room in terms of luggage.
    Really? Recently, all I see are complaints about how the latest Open Pros aren't nearly as durable as the ones being made several years ago. Lots of reports of rims cracking, spokes pulling through, etc. I've seen these reports in the Clyde and Road forums, among others. I don't think a light-weight wheelset is a bad idea, but I'm not sure I'd take a chance on the Open Pros...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    central florida
    Posts
    180
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lets face it, this is the only bike
    that'll satisfy purists for touring....600_8955817e1bfc0e8fabe275ed3518f660[1].jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,114
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Really? Recently, all I see are complaints about how the latest Open Pros aren't nearly as durable as the ones being made several years ago. Lots of reports of rims cracking, spokes pulling through, etc. I've seen these reports in the Clyde and Road forums, among others. I don't think a light-weight wheelset is a bad idea, but I'm not sure I'd take a chance on the Open Pros...
    This is true. I won't build with Open Pros anymore. The quality control is no longer there. You might get a wheel that will last 50,000 miles or you might get one that will start cracking 200 miles down the road. Even if I did build a wheel with Open Pros, I would not tour with them. And if a customer asked for them, I would refuse to build it. I just don't have enough faith in the rim.
    Learn what's a platform pedal.

  9. #9
    Senior Member tarwheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    My Bikes
    Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL
    Posts
    7,243
    Mentioned
    32 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I've got Open Pros that have been trouble-free with more than 20,000 miles of use and newer ones that cracked will just a few thousand miles. I had some Velocity Dyad 36H rims built for touring and they are much lighter and less expensive than Mavic 719s and reportedly just as durable. My LBS also built me some 32H DT Swiss 465s that my mechanic feels are more durable than 36H OPs.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,410
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
    By the way, you should think about why touring is different (and harder on wheels). The rider can and does get his butt off the bike when he/she hits a bump which makes a life a lot easier on the wheels.
    Yep, bunny hopping with panniers, piece of cake!

  11. #11
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    9,384
    Mentioned
    72 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can tour on anything you want, all sorts of bikes tour the coast.

    If you bring money , then you don't have to carry much more than a weekend amount of gear.
    a few tools and clothes for changing weather..
    AKA credit card touring..

    should you damage the wheel, you can always buy another one.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-02-12 at 08:48 PM.

  12. #12
    Senior Member alan s's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    3,610
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Turn the question around and ask yourself why you would tour on Open Pros? Do you already have them, so it is a cost issue to buy another wheelset? Do you need the extra .25 mph a lighter wheelset will give you? Over a day, that could add up to a couple extra miles. Is the peace of mind from knowing your wheels are overbuilt or just right, rather than underbuilt, not worth a lot to you?

  13. #13
    Randomhead
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    13,616
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    a lighter wheelset will not gain you an appreciable amount of speed, but it can delay you by a lot while you are trying to figure out how to replace the rim. My favorite rim right now is the Velocity Synergy, although I have been thinking about trying the A23's.

  14. #14
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Edwardsville or Chicago Illinois
    My Bikes
    Peugeot PX10, Serotta Nova X, Simoncini Cyclocross Special, Origin8 monstercross, Pedal Force CG2 and CX2
    Posts
    9,677
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    a lighter wheelset will not gain you an appreciable amount of speed, but it can delay you by a lot while you are trying to figure out how to replace the rim. My favorite rim right now is the Velocity Synergy, although I have been thinking about trying the A23's.

    +1

    I've been using 32 hole A23's with great results for more than a year. I have 4000 miles on one set with zero problems. I'm 210 pounds. If the route was 100% good pavement, I'd use the A23.

    I'm using Velocity Dyad for gravel paths and roads.
    When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

  15. #15
    __________ seeker333's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,816
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    favorite rim right now is the Velocity Synergy
    I've built several with Synergy OC rim in 26", and I like them too for the dish reduction.

    I'm thinking of building some disc-capable light tourer wheels with (700c) Aerohead OC. I found some for $45, cheaper than Synergy at $65, and I'm currently pinching pennies (and twenties). Have you tried the Aerohead OC?

  16. #16
    Senior Member Shimagnolo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Zang's Spur, CO
    Posts
    6,754
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by seeker333 View Post
    I've built several with Synergy OC rim in 26", and I like them too for the dish reduction.

    I'm thinking of building some disc-capable light tourer wheels with (700c) Aerohead OC. I found some for $45, cheaper than Synergy at $65, and I'm currently pinching pennies (and twenties). Have you tried the Aerohead OC?
    I have Synergy's on two bikes, and Aerohead's on a third, all with OC on the rear.
    Love 'em!

  17. #17
    I'm doing it wrong. RJM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    My Bikes
    2014 Rivendell Roadeo, 2010 Rivendell Sam Hillborne, 2014 Trek Fuel Ex 9, 1996 Specialized Stumpjumper
    Posts
    3,932
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    a lighter wheelset will not gain you an appreciable amount of speed, but it can delay you by a lot while you are trying to figure out how to replace the rim. My favorite rim right now is the Velocity Synergy, although I have been thinking about trying the A23's.
    Tough choice between the Synergy OC and the Dyad. I have two wheelsets but the Dyad is laced to Phil freewheel hubs and the Synergy to LX hubs. I rather ride the Phil just cause I like the bling, but it has nothing to do with the rim. Synergy rims are pretty sweet.(Dyads are too)
    "Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself." - Leo Tolstoy

  18. #18
    <riding now> BigAura's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Chapin, SC
    My Bikes
    surly LHT, paris sport fixie, trek 5000, fuji ss
    Posts
    1,729
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by lachy94 View Post
    I regularly see posts from clydes weighing 220 pounds (or more) espousing the strength of Open Pros. Given I only weigh 180 I figure I would have a bit of breathing room in terms of luggage
    If your breathing room of 40 pounds includes ALL GEAR (racks, panniers, helmet, shoes, camping stuff, tools...) and SUPPLIES (full water & max food). PLUS your route is paved then your 32-hole-open-pro's will probably work fine. If you're over that weight OR considering unpaved roads, I'd think twice.
    bikegpx.us for free touring map routes & gpx files

  19. #19
    A little North of Hell
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,594
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    rims

    there are other rims besides open pro's.
    Ambrosio Excellence
    Torelli Triumph(same as above)
    DT Swiss RR 465
    Mavic CXP 33
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    XXXI

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,295
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
    a lighter wheelset will not gain you an appreciable amount of speed, but it can delay you by a lot while you are trying to figure out how to replace the rim. My favorite rim right now is the Velocity Synergy, although I have been thinking about trying the A23's.
    I have Synergy OCs front and rear on my touring bike. I've been very happy with them so far! Love the way they keep the spoke tension more even between the drive and non-drive (or brake and non-brake) sides of the wheel.

  21. #21
    Cyclist storckm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    My Bikes
    Yuba Mundo; Early 70's Free Spirit (Reynolds 531) fixie; 80's Shogun 500; Mid 90's Iron Horse tandem; trailer and tag-a-long; Schwinn Range for commuting, with lights and front and rear racks.
    Posts
    558
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Twenty pounds is pretty light. One difference between a heavy rider and a light rider with gear is that the gear can't lift up a little to make things easier on the wheels when going over bumps.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,410
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I knew a guy who toured through Italy on 360gram sewup rims with panniers. He weighed 125lbs. My partner in the shop weighed 185lbs and he rode on light Rigida rims with 15lbs of gear.

    I guess the real question is what reward you get using training/racing rims over touring rims designed for the load? After X trips do you say "yeehaw, my wheels are still round!"?

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Pearland, Texas
    My Bikes
    Cannondale, Trek, Raleigh, Santana
    Posts
    5,995
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lachlan, I have an older set of OPCDs that have been on a couple of my road bikes and they're great, on the road bike. True enough you can mount wide tires on a narrow rim as mountain bikes often are set up that way. My touring bike has CR18 rims and 35 mm tires. Just my opinion that a wide road tire works better with a wider rim. While nobody wants to grind more weight than they have to up a hill, a heavier wheelset and tire combo works well on the flats, much like a flywheel.

    Your bike, your choice.

    Brad

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi all,


    Sorry if I came off a bit obnoxious, I wrote the message quite late at night and didn't put much thought into it.


    Thanks for your feedback. Especially valuable is the advice about the drop in QC at mavic and also the consideration about the fact touring weight can't react to the road.

    I should have specified this wheelset will not be touring only, and will serve as a general commuting and winter training set, so I don't want to carry potentially unecessary weight 100% of the time for the small % I am actually touring. However, you have convinced me I should find a better compromise.


    At a bike shop the other day I was discussing this issue. I was mentioning dyads, but the guy there recommended the H+ Son TB14. Partly because of the aesthetic, which suits my Bob Jackson, but partly also because they weigh the same as dyads but are a little more engineered (double eyeletted, welded instead of pinned, reinforced valve area). They're quite a new rim, but does anyone have experience with them?



    Cheers, Lachlan

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,410
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    best way to address unnecessary weight is with the extra 10lbs of racks, lock, lap top, beer, books, etc. After that look at lighter tires as well as building the front wheel differently than the rear. Commuting and training wheels aren't supposed to be light, they're supposed to last, once you put the expectation of carrying a pannier load on your everyday wheels why not go for durable? For the extra 100grams in the heavier rear rim you can put on a 300 gram tire instead of a 450gram touring tire. Ta Da, you now have lighter wheels.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •