Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 98
  1. #1
    Member Nitatunarabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Russia
    My Bikes
    Surly Moonlander, Salsa Vaya
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Choosing a bike for a lite touring. 1 - 1.5K EUR.

    Hello! First of all, sorry for my English, I'm Russian.

    I want to buy a new bike for a lite touring (not very long, not so fast, almost recreational riding for about 60-80 km (37-50 miles)).

    My current bike is an old and crappy japanese full-suspended piece of junc, the UGO folding:
    001.jpg

    I've bought it occasionaly last season for a very little amount of money just to try cycling. I didn't know how cool and exciting is to ride the bicycle can be, so I decided to get the cheapest option available. Now I'm addicted, and I'm on the market to replace the bike :))

    I'm totally newbie in cycling, so I don't really know, what bike (and what a kind of a bike) I really need. As I mentioned above, the distances are not very long, but I want to increase the distance at least twice. There are many hills and some dirt on the road. You can see the pictures below:
    002.jpg

    003.jpg

    004.jpg

    005.jpg

    006.jpg


    After some reading on the Internet, I decided to get a touring or cyclocross bike. I want a light-weight bike, I want Quick-Releases on both wheels (I need to trensport the bike by the train to the track). My budget is 1000 - 1.500 EUR.

    Here are my options now:
    1. Salsa Vaya 3
    2. Kona Sutra
    3. Bianchi Imola
    4. Trek 520
    5. Jamis Aurora Elite
    6. Surly Long Haul Trucker
    7. Kona Jake the Snake
    8. Scott CX Comp

    Is at least one of them suitable for the road pictured above? Have you any other suggestions?

    Update 1 (24-jul-2012): Bike choosed, bought and assembled. Here are the total list of components, the review and the addendum in this thread.
    Last edited by Nitatunarabe; 07-23-12 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Added links to reviews for those who came here from the search engines.
    Please, sorry for my English. It's not my native language.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chapala, Mexico
    My Bikes
    Habanero Titanium
    Posts
    284
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Your English is very good! I tried to learn Russian and was terrible so you have my respect.

    It looks like you have several nice choices in your list. Are you able to actually test each one out to see how comfortable they are for you? Fit is very, very important (as I learned the hard way). IŽm sure youŽll have several replies from some of the more qualified riders on this site, but I would buy the bike with the best fit and then make sure it has as many of the features that I could afford. Quality really does matter.

    FWIW, you donŽt have to be a super-rider, but just enjoy it. I started riding again a few years ago and know IŽll never be super-fit or super-fast, but there is something about biking that really makes me happy. When I ride, I can relax and let my mind clear. And at the end of a longer ride, the feeling of accomplishment is incredible.

    Please post pictures when youŽve made your choice. Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chris Pringle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The Pearl of the Pacific, Mexico
    My Bikes
    '12 Rodriguez UTB Custom, '83 Miyata 610, '83 Nishiki Century Mixte (Work of Art), '06 Specialized Epic Marathon MTB
    Posts
    1,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Concur with Dengidog. You've done a nice job narrowing down the list of bikes. Now it's a matter of fitting and testing. I see many of your top choices are American brands. Our European counterparts have mentioned here that many these models are REALLY difficult to source in Europe, although they are popular bikes in the U.S. An example of this is the ubiquitous Surly Long Haul Trucker which you see all over the internet and here in the Bike Forums. It might be possible to import it but it might not be worth the hefty extra cost for a bike that you'll be getting based on reviews. At any rate, my suggestion is also to look at German and UK brands. You might have an easier time finding them in Russia to try before you buy.

  4. #4
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Uncertain
    Posts
    7,090
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Looking at the road surfaces, and your suggestion that the touring you want to do is light, and relatively short, I'd say a Cyclocross bike would be ideal. You've already identified the jake the snake and the Scott CX comp. Add the Specialized Tricross sport and the Fuji Cross to your list and pick the one you like the best. All of these bikes will do the job you describe very well, and be fast enough on paved roads to give you a real road-bike feel. And all of these bikes are readily available on this side of the pond, though I'm afraid I have no idea how easy it is to find them in Russia.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sherwood, OR
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Please forgive the question, but how much do you weigh? If you are over 85-90kg (190 pounds), I would be looking at all steel bikes to ride on the roads you picture. I do not have anything against carbon (My Jake the Snake has a carbon fork) but if I was riding in those conditions, I would take my Long Haul Trucker. It weighs 3-4kg more, but if you are carrying gear, you would hardly notice the weight.

    At the very least, I would exclude bikes that have less than 28 spokes on either wheel.

    To echo what others have stated, test ride as many bikes as possible, and make sure that the shop (if you have one) fits the bike to you before you test ride it.

    Good luck, welcome to Bike Forums, and let us know how you fare!

  6. #6
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Windy City
    My Bikes
    A road bike for every purpose
    Posts
    9,461
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also look at the Bianchi Volpe: http://www.bianchiusa.com/bikes/road/steel/volpe/

    This is a Cyclocross/touring & sports bike that fits your needs.
    2014 Trek DS.1: "Viaggiatore" A do-it-all bike that is waiting in Italy
    2012 Pedal Force CG2: "Secolo Bicicletta" the modern carbon fiber road bike
    2012 Pedal Force CX2: "Carbone CX" the carbon fiber CX bike
    2010 Origin 8 CX 700: "Servizio Grave" Monstercross/29er bike
    1997 Simoncini Special Cyclocross: "Little Simon" lugged Columbus steel CX bike
    1987 Serotta Nova Special X: "Azzurri" The retro Columbus SPX steel road bike
    1971ish Peugeot PX10: "Fancy Lugs"

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,212
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Can you get all those bikes where you live? are there bike shops to test ride any on the list?

    Given the road conditions, Rigid fork mountain bike, 1.75" wide touring tire.
    change handlebars and saddle to suit your personal preferences.

  8. #8
    Member Nitatunarabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Russia
    My Bikes
    Surly Moonlander, Salsa Vaya
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you all, guys, for the response an for the warm welcome! It's really nice to receive the help and to read the opinions from people around the world. Internet is a really great thing, and this forum is one of the best resources there!

    Quote Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
    Please forgive the question, but how much do you weigh?
    Oh, aggiegrads, you should not apologize for your question, it's correct! My weight is about 50-55kg (110-122 lbs), plus backpack (no more than 10 kg (22 lbs)), see photo below:
    DSCF3203.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
    It weighs 3-4kg more, but if you are carrying gear, you would hardly notice the weight.
    The weight is not a problem while riding. My current bike is about 18 kg (~39.7 lbs) and I really do not feel it's "heavy" while riding.

    The problem is that I need to travel to my riding road by the train, so I should carry the bike in hands to load it to a railroad car, to bring it to the railway platform and so on... The problem is about hand-lifting and carrying, not about the riding.

    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Can you get all those bikes where you live? are there bike shops to test ride any on the list?
    No, unfortunately, I cannot get none of the listed bikes locally. There are only a few bike shops in my area, and there no Konas, Salsas and so on there. The most popular bikes here are Stelses, GTs and, sometimes, Cubes. Almost all bikes here are MTBs. Most of them are full-suspended.

    I have to mention that buying a new, well-known-branded bike is not common in my area, most peple buying old used Japanese or very-very-very cheap Chinese nonames.

    There is no such thing as "test ride" in local shops, as I know. You can go to the shop, talk to seller, see (but not to touch!) the bikes and make a decision which to buy (or not to buy). If you buy a used bike (or bike which someone sells personally, not as a shop), you can do a very short ride arond the seller (a few meters circle around the person who sells the bike). I have no idea how to understand anything from such test!

    So, I decided to import the bike myself. Fortunately, now the e-Commerce is very developed and Russian post has a very large and reliable logistics network, so delivering a bike from the US or the EU should not be a problem. I have an experiense in delivering appliances and equipment from Germany, China, Japan and the US, so I think, I can buy the bike online anywhere.

    ---

    I have a question about Jake the Snake. I've read at Bike Radar's review that this bike is hard to drive uphill:
    However, while we understand that 48/39 front chainrings are great for the road, we were gagging for lower ratios when riding 'proper' trails. That'll require a change of chainset though, so try and negotiate a swap to a triple or compact drive unit when you buy.
    The are many hills in my area, and climbing ability of the bike is important to me. Which of the mentioned bikes can provide it?

  9. #9
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Uncertain
    Posts
    7,090
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nitatunarabe View Post


    Oh, aggiegrads, you should not apologize for your question, it's correct! My weight is about 50-55kg (110-122 lbs), plus backpack (no more than 10 kg (22 lbs))
    I'd recommend that you buy a bike with a rack and put your baggage in panniers, or at least secure your backpack to the rack. Wearing a backpack while riding becomes less and less pleasant the further one goes.


    I have a question about Jake the Snake. I've read at Bike Radar's review that this bike is hard to drive uphill:


    The are many hills in my area, and climbing ability of the bike is important to me. Which of the mentioned bikes can provide it?
    Most of the bikes listed are geared slightly lower than the Jake, but with the cyclocross bikes the difference between them amounts to only a few percentage points. If ease of climbing is a priority then I think you should consider the bikes that come with a triple chainring. The Kona Sutra is one such, and of course it already has a rack for your baggage.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Sherwood, OR
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    Most of the bikes listed are geared slightly lower than the Jake, but with the cyclocross bikes the difference between them amounts to only a few percentage points. If ease of climbing is a priority then I think you should consider the bikes that come with a triple chainring. The Kona Sutra is one such, and of course it already has a rack for your baggage.
    The Surly Cross Check might be worth a closer look if you are concerned about gearing. It comes "triple ready", meaning that the crankset is drilled to accept a third chainring, the stock derailleur is for a triple, and the rear derailleur is a long cage. The cross check is an extremely durable and versatile bike. Rack and fenders will be no problem at all.

    You can disregard my previous comment about carbon forks. At your weight, I would not worry about it at all. I was picturing a 100kg guy named "Sasha" thundering down unpaved roads in rural Russia.

    Since you will not be able to test ride a bike, you want to pay very close attention to how your bike fits you and decide if you want something bigger or smaller. The length of the top tube is the most important measurement. There is a Surly owners group on google that has compiled a spreadsheet of different rider's measurements and the frame sizes that they own. This would be an excellent resource if you decide on a Long Haul Trucker or Cross Check.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Chapala, Mexico
    My Bikes
    Habanero Titanium
    Posts
    284
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by aggiegrads View Post
    The Surly Cross Check might be worth a closer look if you are concerned about gearing. It comes "triple ready", meaning that the crankset is drilled to accept a third chainring, the stock derailleur is for a triple, and the rear derailleur is a long cage. The cross check is an extremely durable and versatile bike. Rack and fenders will be no problem at all.

    You can disregard my previous comment about carbon forks. At your weight, I would not worry about it at all. I was picturing a 100kg guy named "Sasha" thundering down unpaved roads in rural Russia.

    Since you will not be able to test ride a bike, you want to pay very close attention to how your bike fits you and decide if you want something bigger or smaller. The length of the top tube is the most important measurement. There is a Surly owners group on google that has compiled a spreadsheet of different rider's measurements and the frame sizes that they own. This would be an excellent resource if you decide on a Long Haul Trucker or Cross Check.
    I really agree w/Aggie about paying close attention to the bike fit. I had to do the same thing (ordering a bike from the US when I live in Mexico) and my lack of bicycle knowledge really showed when I first rode it. Some of the problems are too embarrassing to admit (totally my fault), but once the bike had a few adjustments, it was like magic. Now when I ride, I feel like IŽm flying. Take your measurements, have a friend take them, and then do it once more. Make sure youŽre confident in the numbers. Good luck and donŽt forget to let us know what you get!
    Last edited by dengidog; 05-11-12 at 01:38 PM.

  12. #12
    Member Nitatunarabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Russia
    My Bikes
    Surly Moonlander, Salsa Vaya
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Now, I'm considering to get Salsa Vaya 3 or Kona Sutra. I'm checking the availability of both bikes at this time and will post the final decision here.

    I've asked the same question (which bike is right for me) here, in Russian bike forums, and all the people said that I need a MTB (hardtail). They said that none of the listed bikes is suitable for my roads (I can post more pictures if needed), and the touring / cyclocross bike is a very bad option. They said that the bike which is suitable for the pictured roads MUST (yes, uppercase!) have a suspension fork.

    I know, for some reason the MTB is the most popular kind of bike here, in Russia. Many people ride hardtails and even full-suspended MTBs even on paved roads. But... Maybe they're right? What do you think?
    Please, sorry for my English. It's not my native language.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You don't need suspension on the roads in the pictures, but I would choose wide tyres (fe. 26" 50mm). I'd happily ride them with my LHT . The suspension is just an other heavy part that can fail...

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bremen, Germany
    My Bikes
    Poison Chinin IGH
    Posts
    365
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nitatunarabe, don't be sorry for your English, it's more than adequate.

    Lots of folks in Russia had good experience with German bike shops, like bike-components.de or bike-discount.de (excuse me moderators, no advertising here). And they source those Salsas and Surlys, you'd find those bikes there for sure. Another choice could be Fahrrad Manufaktur T-Randonneur, it's very similar to your choice and easy to order from Germany.

    Do not be worried about front suspension and mtb frames. Good front shock that will help you on the bad roads costs a lot, requires regular maintaince, will not let you use lowriders, etc. It's a good thing for serious offroad riding, but most of the people doing real world touring on the most crappy roads choose to stay away from suspension forks, if nothing else, rigid forks are lighter, cheaper and nothing can go wrong with them, less headaches! Remember that front shock was designed to glue the front wheel to the ground, to increase speed on the singletrack and not to increase your comfort. FYI, Chukotka guys ride rigid bikes, there was a thread recently at Velopiter.

    What will help you on those roads are wide tires and longer wheelbase. It will roll over potholes very nicely and will provide quite some cushion to your ride.

    In Russia MTB is so popular mostly to due to the marketing hype. Which forum in Russia are you using? I could suggest asking also on Velopiter.spb.ru or Velomania. Still majority will recommend you MTB hardtails, but there are plenty of folks who ride something more similar to what you want (including myself ). I wonder where do you live actually? Must be somewhere in the North or East, no?

    A bike like LHT or Vaya looks gorgeous among all those cheapo Stels bicycles.

    Concerning your choice: I'd look for the bikes that can allow tires 42 - 47 mm wide or wider. That way you can go trail riding loaded or not and having a comfortable ride. Winter riding will be Ok as well. I think Kona Sutra is a bit on the narrow side, though it will be just fine on those roads in summer.

    What is really important, get the bike that will fit your body! A bit hard to do over the internet, especially since most of the bikes are designed for mens proportions. You are going for road style frame and handlebars, that is quite different from mtb bikes you may find around. Really, invest some time in asking and finding what size is appropriate for your dimensions. I keep recommending people to use Competitive Cyclist bike fit calculator, the french road fit, it saved me from the lower back pain and works very well for my wife (she also rides the bike of the style you've chosen).

    --
    I keep editing this post If you ride in really horrible muddy spring roads, be sure to have tires that will have some knobs or a good thread for good traction.

    Look what bikes we were riding around Ladoga Lake, where roads were in both, good and terrible condition, paved and unpaved, hilly and flat, and we did some forest riding too. Everything except mud. Great memories and no issues with the type of the bikes we had.

    Last edited by mikhalit; 05-10-12 at 09:03 AM.

  15. #15
    Conquer Cancer rider Boudicca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    Fun bike, city bike, Bike Friday bike (also fun bike)
    Posts
    5,825
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Where are you in Russia, Nita? And will the drivers respect cyclists? I lived in Moscow for five years, and I swear I only saw a bicycle there once, and it was being ridden on a crazy-busy Moscow Garden Ring by a man with one leg (I kid you not -- he was sort of kicking the pedal up with his single leg to push down on it again). It looked a bit like a suicide wish to me. But that was a long time ago, and even then the roads in dacha country would have been lovely for road bike or cyclocross. Little traffic, relatively smooth surfaces.
    Zero gallons to the mile

  16. #16
    Senior Member Chris Pringle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The Pearl of the Pacific, Mexico
    My Bikes
    '12 Rodriguez UTB Custom, '83 Miyata 610, '83 Nishiki Century Mixte (Work of Art), '06 Specialized Epic Marathon MTB
    Posts
    1,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How are things going? I believe a frame with wide tires will be fine. Make sure you can get it with 26" tires 1.75 to 2.0. A bike with "good" front suspension will throw off your budget to $2,000 or more. If you're doing a mail order from the U.S., you will find that most of the major brands can't be sold that way there. They require you walk into a shop. It can be frustrating. Have you considered going custom? If you are ordering a U.S. brand all the way from America, why not go for something truly made there? Try a brand such as Rodriguez who have tons of experience working with women and customers overseas. Explain to them your situation and concerns. You will also need to increase your budget for that, but you will be much happier with the investment made.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bremen, Germany
    My Bikes
    Poison Chinin IGH
    Posts
    365
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just remembered someone explaining that in mud you don't actually need a wide tire, you need a tire like 37mm wide to cut through the mud. And this guy (mev) cycled from Amsterdam to Vladivostok and had good experience with 35mm tires, see his post.

    And next time someone tries to convince you that full suspension is necessary for your roads, show them the AfrikaBike picture, that's the bike that Kona designed specifically for utility cycling in the African conditions. No suspension and only one gear.

    Last edited by mikhalit; 05-10-12 at 08:43 AM.

  18. #18
    Slow Rider bwgride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    811
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nitatunarabe View Post
    Now, I'm considering to get Salsa Vaya 3 or Kona Sutra. I'm checking the availability of both bikes at this time and will post the final decision here.

    I've asked the same question (which bike is right for me) here, in Russian bike forums, and all the people said that I need a MTB (hardtail). They said that none of the listed bikes is suitable for my roads (I can post more pictures if needed), and the touring / cyclocross bike is a very bad option. They said that the bike which is suitable for the pictured roads MUST (yes, uppercase!) have a suspension fork.

    I know, for some reason the MTB is the most popular kind of bike here, in Russia. Many people ride hardtails and even full-suspended MTBs even on paved roads. But... Maybe they're right? What do you think?
    I think the Salsa Vaya would be excellent. You certainly do NOT need suspension for off-road or bad roads. I regularly ride my Surly LHT off-road with wider tires (see images), so I think it too would be a good choice.

    When I buy a new bike I will likely get a Surly Troll and I think this bike would work very well in your area:

    http://surlybikes.com/bikes/troll
    Attached Images Attached Images

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Bremen, Germany
    My Bikes
    Poison Chinin IGH
    Posts
    365
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My favorite Vaya build (can't help it, i love monstercross bikes ) :
    Last edited by mikhalit; 05-10-12 at 08:45 AM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    898
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Nitatunarabe View Post
    Now, I'm considering to get Salsa Vaya 3 or Kona Sutra. I'm checking the availability of both bikes at this time and will post the final decision here.

    I've asked the same question (which bike is right for me) here, in Russian bike forums, and all the people said that I need a MTB (hardtail). They said that none of the listed bikes is suitable for my roads (I can post more pictures if needed), and the touring / cyclocross bike is a very bad option. They said that the bike which is suitable for the pictured roads MUST (yes, uppercase!) have a suspension fork.

    I know, for some reason the MTB is the most popular kind of bike here, in Russia. Many people ride hardtails and even full-suspended MTBs even on paved roads. But... Maybe they're right? What do you think?
    I have personally toured on both a 700c touring bike like the Salsa Vaya/Sutra/Soma Saga or LHT type in the past and had also toured until recently with a full suspension bike, namely a BMC Fourstroke 03 running a pair of Old Man Mountain panniers until its recent demise when it got ran over by an 18 wheeler truck! I had ridden in very rough roads myself, especially on FSR (Forestry Service Roads) on Vancouver, BC, Canada and our interior like the Kettle Valley, Cowichan trails and some small remote islands that you need to get on small powered boats.

    Judging from your size, you would probably benefit more on the Salsa Vaya 3 as this bike uses 26" tires (MTB size) on their 50 to 52cm sizes. Unless you're an abnormally very large and tall woman, the Salsa will give you more options in tire sizes in the 26" range for your terrain. The Sutra is meant mostly for road touring, so the tire clearance for fatter tires are not as good as with the Salsa.

    Suspension forks. There is nothing wrong riding with a suspension fork at all, but having one does help smooth out the bumps. I've ridden on roads that are similar to yours on both touring bike and a fully suspended bike. Guess what, the suspended bike provides 100% more comfort. Fat tires can only provide limited suspension capabilities. I've led tours off-road with people who claimed that their touring bikes with off-road tires will do fine, but after about 40km or so, they couldn't wait until they see the first sign of a highway to get on to! In fact, it was just last year and some with bikes that are posted here.

    Again, comfort is an individual thing. Some people can sleep like a baby with a thin Thermarest, but some may need extra thick ones and some more may need a real bed or an air mattress. Just because someone said a Thermarest is like a mattress does not really mean that you're going to feel the same.

    Touring is about being comfortable on the saddle and bars and I think the majority of people in your Russian forum probably speaks experience. But your needs may be different than the masses, your choice basically has to come down to fit, and then choosing the right bike for the comfort as well as weight for portaging.

    Hope this helps..
    Trek 5000 carbon road bike
    Masi Speciale CX touring bike
    Dahon Mu SL (performance hybrid road bike)
    Dahon Speed Duo (slow poker shopper or coffee getter bike)

  21. #21
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,212
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Are you going into the euro-zone countries to shop for your bike,
    or are you looking at Russian bikes?
    perhaps Origial-Posting person can share what bike brands are available to him,
    without say shipping western brands half way around the globe.

    all 8 of those brands are common in the US market, may be not in Eastern Europe.

    Then suggestions amongst what bikes are actually available to him,
    can narrow the field.

    If buying a particular wheel size, are spare tires available locally?

    A rigid fork hard tail MTB is still a reasonable choice,
    given wide popularity of , the 559 tire spares are easier to find.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 05-10-12 at 12:12 PM.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Sandy, UT
    My Bikes
    Gunnar Roadie, Gunnar Sport, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2, Miyata 610, Seven Elium Race
    Posts
    69
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Long Haul Trucker is very sturdy, and fits 26" wheels if you order the right frame. Suspension does make rough roads easier. If you want suspension in a hard tail, then the Surly Troll is a good bet. The right size is key. You have more room for sizing error with the Troll since it's a mountain bike frame. Try to write somebody about fit and sizing, or just read on the internet. Can somebody in Russia that you have faith in give you an idea what size mountain bike frame you should ride?

    If you are concerned about carrying weight, either of the Surly's will weigh much less than your current bike. My 58CM Long Haul Trucker probably weighs about 30. Assuming you'd ride a smaller size, yours would weigh less than that. The nice things about Surlys is that they're tough, and you can buy them fully built up if you want.

    Good luck. Keep looking and writing and this will work out. Enjoy the road!
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Gunnar Sport, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis, Miyata 610.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Sandy, UT
    My Bikes
    Gunnar Roadie, Gunnar Sport, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis 2, Miyata 610, Seven Elium Race
    Posts
    69
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh, one more thing, unless they're a lot more expensive over there, both the Surlys are well within your budget.
    Seven Elium Race, Gunnar Roadie, Gunnar Sport, Surly LHT, Gary Fisher Genesis, Miyata 610.

  24. #24
    eternalvoyage
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,437
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you opt for a rigid fork, adding a good suspension stem will help with bumps and rough roads.

    Learning to grip more lightly can help too. On very rough roads, your shoulders can take a beating. Good suspension stems help, and require little maintenance.

    You might be able to find used ones on the internet.

    Good luck, and hope you enjoy whatever you decide on.

  25. #25
    Member Nitatunarabe's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Russia
    My Bikes
    Surly Moonlander, Salsa Vaya
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Велосипеды

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    Lots of folks in Russia had good experience with German bike shops, like bike-components.de or bike-discount.de
    Thank you for the links, mikhalit! Unfortunately, bike-discount.de does not ship assembled bikes to Russia. I'll check bike-components.de later.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    What will help you on those roads are wide tires and longer wheelbase. It will roll over potholes very nicely and will provide quite some cushion to your ride.
    Thank you again. I think, both Sutra and Vaya-3 are long enough for me :)


    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    Which forum in Russia are you using?
    I've asked this question at two forums: drom.ru (not the best plase to ask about bikes, I know) and at veloforum.net (both links are machine-translated to English).

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    I wonder where do you live actually? Must be somewhere in the North or East, no?
    I live in Vladivostok.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    Look what bikes we were riding around Ladoga Lake, where roads were in both, good and terrible condition, paved and unpaved, hilly and flat, and we did some forest riding too. Everything except mud. Great memories and no issues with the type of the bikes we had.
    You've calmed me down. If you rode that roads without issues, I think, I have no reasons to worry about the bike's ability to survive there :))

    ------
    Quote Originally Posted by Boudicca View Post
    Where are you in Russia, Nita? And will the drivers respect cyclists? I lived in Moscow for five years, and I swear I only saw a bicycle there once, and it was being ridden on a crazy-busy Moscow Garden Ring by a man with one leg (I kid you not -- he was sort of kicking the pedal up with his single leg to push down on it again). It looked a bit like a suicide wish to me. But that was a long time ago, and even then the roads in dacha country would have been lovely for road bike or cyclocross. Little traffic, relatively smooth surfaces.
    AFAIK, here, in Vladivostok is almost the same crazy traffic and even worse roads. I almost never ride here expect a short trip from my home to the train station and [seldom] night rining near my home: on weekends, at 03-04AM there are almost no cars and people on the streets, and it's possible to join the ride in Vladivostok :))

    Most time I ride not in Vladivostok, but in Shkotovo village and near (the people there believe that the "City 17" from Half Life - 2 is actually Shkotovo).

    ----
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Pringle View Post
    Have you considered going custom?
    No, I have not. To build custom is too complex task for me. To buy an already-made custom is difficult too, because I cannot decide which of them is actually "good", and which is "crap" due to lack of knowledge and experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Pringle View Post
    Try a brand such as Rodriguez who have tons of experience working with women and customers overseas. Explain to them your situation and concerns. You will also need to increase your budget for that, but you will be much happier with the investment made.
    Unfortunately, Rodriguez bikes are out of my budget.

    ----
    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    Just remembered someone explaining that in mud you don't actually need a wide tire, you need a tire like 37mm wide to cut through the mud. And this guy (mev) cycled from Amsterdam to Vladivostok and had good experience with 35mm tires, see his post.
    Great news, I can use Kona sutra! :))

    Quote Originally Posted by mikhalit View Post
    And next time someone tries to convince you that full suspension is necessary for your roads, show them the AfrikaBike picture, that's the bike that Kona designed specifically for utility cycling in the African conditions. No suspension and only one gear.
    Nice picture, thanks! I'll post it in that forums :))
    ----
    Quote Originally Posted by bwgride View Post
    I think the Salsa Vaya would be excellent.
    I like Vaya-3 too. But in comparison to Kona Sutra, the Vaya-3 has a worse equipment (Avid BB vs BB7 brakes, Sora vs Tiagra). The price is almost the same for me, so I consider to get Sutra. What do you think?

    ----
    Quote Originally Posted by pacificcyclist View Post
    Judging from your size, you would probably benefit more on the Salsa Vaya 3 as this bike uses 26" tires (MTB size) on their 50 to 52cm sizes. Unless you're an abnormally very large and tall woman, the Salsa will give you more options in tire sizes in the 26" range for your terrain. The Sutra is meant mostly for road touring, so the tire clearance for fatter tires are not as good as with the Salsa.
    How do you think, does the equipment difference between the Vaya-3 and the Sutra matter?

    ---
    Quote Originally Posted by chris1548 View Post
    Try to write somebody about fit and sizing, or just read on the internet. Can somebody in Russia that you have faith in give you an idea what size mountain bike frame you should ride?
    Thank you for advice. I'll read, calculate and post the results here.

    Quote Originally Posted by chris1548 View Post
    If you are concerned about carrying weight, either of the Surly's will weigh much less than your current bike.
    Yes, that's true! I think, almost any modern bike (maybe expect downhill ones) is lighter then my 18kg (~36 lbs) hippopotamus :))
    Please, sorry for my English. It's not my native language.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •