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Old 01-17-05, 08:48 PM   #1
wolfclan333
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Do people actually use trunk bags on tour?

My last tour I strapped on my tent and bag on top of rack (where a trunk bag would fit) Do people use trunk bags on tour? I do see that trunk bags are nice for day rides (lunch jacket etc) but on a tour???
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Old 01-17-05, 10:45 PM   #2
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I did a week long ride in September, where I camped out 3 nights and stayed in motels the other 3. I was able to pack all my needs in two rear panniers, a handlebar bag, and a trunk bag. My sleeping bag and tent fit in one pannier. I carried no cooking supplies.

My next tour, whenever that happens, will see me using two front and two rear panniers along with a handlebar bag. I intend to carry a pillow and other larger items, and will probably put the tent and/or sleeping bag on top of the rack.
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Old 01-18-05, 09:41 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wolfclan333
My last tour I strapped on my tent and bag on top of rack (where a trunk bag would fit) Do people use trunk bags on tour? I do see that trunk bags are nice for day rides (lunch jacket etc) but on a tour???
I use a trunk bag for around town but I wouldn't use one on tour. That back rack is valuable real estate. The tent, bag and pad are too bulky to put in panniers. If you need room for jackets and daily wear clothes, a handlebar bag will do the trick.

Make sure you get good bungies for holding down the stuff however. Watching your sleeping bag, tent and pad bouncing down the road in the middle of nowhere will get your heart to going Stopping to set up camp at night after a 90 mile day and not finding them there will get your heart to stop!
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Old 01-18-05, 09:55 AM   #4
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I use a trunk bag while touring. I camp with a minimal of gear so everything packs inside my panniers. I don't like to have my tent and sleeping bag exposed to the elements on the rear rack so they also are safely packed away. Inside the trunk bag is my camera (now new digital camera , snacks for the day, wallet, cell phone and rain jacket. These are all things I need quick access to and I can easily take the trunk bag with me if I go into a restaruant or store.
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Old 01-18-05, 10:22 AM   #5
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like cyccommute, my tent and sleeping bag won´t fit in the panniers. and i like piling things on my rear rack so i just bungeed my tent, sleeping bag, daypack and windbreaker on it. i´m thinking about adding a drysack on my next trip. i use 4 bungies, 2 for tent and sleeping, 2 for the small rucksack and the windbreaker.

i put my camera, money, candies, cookies and stuff like that in the handlebar bag. and in the rucksack some more cookies and other bulky stuff like tools that i might need on the road.
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Old 01-18-05, 11:12 AM   #6
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like cyccommute, my tent and sleeping bag won´t fit in the panniers. and i like piling things on my rear rack so i just bungeed my tent, sleeping bag, daypack and windbreaker on it. i´m thinking about adding a drysack on my next trip. i use 4 bungies, 2 for tent and sleeping, 2 for the small rucksack and the windbreaker.

i put my camera, money, candies, cookies and stuff like that in the handlebar bag. and in the rucksack some more cookies and other bulky stuff like tools that i might need on the road.
I carry my tools and excess baggage as well as my wallet and extra glasses in a Camelbak. I know, I know, Camelbaks are sweaty and probably bad for your health but loaded with ice at the start of the morning, there is nothing more refreshing than ice cold water at noon! And I can load two of my three water bottles with Gatorade and not have to suck that swill all day. (Love what it does for me, hate the taste.)

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Old 01-18-05, 12:14 PM   #7
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Camelbaks are sweaty and probably bad for your health
Why is a Camelbak bad for your health? I've been using one for the past 6 months and I thought it is fine....Now you have me thinking I'm doing something wrong... Are they bad for your health?
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Old 01-18-05, 12:28 PM   #8
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Why is a Camelbak bad for your health? I've been using one for the past 6 months and I thought it is fine....Now you have me thinking I'm doing something wrong... Are they bad for your health?
It just when you leave water in them for months at a time and forget to clean them out and they get all slimy on the inside that they MAY be bad for your health. Plus when you ride a road bike with one of them on, the roadies may beat you up or cast disparaging looks in your direction. Who can stand that kind of abuse?

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Old 01-18-05, 09:46 PM   #9
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Do people actually use trunk bags on tour?

Yes, day snacks, notebook & Bible.
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Old 01-18-05, 11:04 PM   #10
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Personally I haven't but I know that many people who go on fully supported tours or even light/credit card tours do use them.

Some of the advantages include the trunk being more behind your body which should provide some aerodynamic benefit. Personally I would be much more tempted to keep the top of the rack empty and use a single saddlebag instead.

It really comes down to the type of tour you are planning to go on and how much carrying capacity you really need.

~Jamie N
htt://www.bicycletouring101.com
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Old 01-18-05, 11:37 PM   #11
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as a light tourer I use a small trunk bag (14L volume) of Deuter (Race X Air model). It has an air-system so sweat is reduced to a minimum. I put around 3kg of lugage in it, which causes no back problems.
The rest of my lugage (around 5-6 kg) is put in a SQR-saddlebag of Carradice (http://www.carradice.co.uk/sqr-products.htm).
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Old 01-18-05, 11:57 PM   #12
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I pack my tent and sleeping bag into a river dry sack and it goes right on the rear rack. Snacks, sun block, and other items which I will need access to, go in my handlebar bag. I don’t travel real light- I would rather enjoy a spacious 2 person tent and comfy warm sleeping bag at the end of the day.

I do use my rack trunk for my daily commute and rides around town.
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Old 01-19-05, 12:43 AM   #13
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I use mine... I mount my tent stakes under it... and anchor the hell out of them so I can be absolutely sure the sakes don't end up on the highway 40 miles behind my campsite :-) It's a handy place to throw stuff like food and waterproof booties...
D
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Old 01-20-05, 03:16 AM   #14
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Instead of a trunk, we used small day packs on a recent tour (along with panniers). I made some straps to hold them on the rack. When we went walking, we could use the day pack as a day pack. Worked wonderfully. You do want to be a bit conscientious and keep the pack straps ends under control and out of your spokes, but that was never really a problem.

Mike

Last edited by sakarias; 01-20-05 at 03:26 AM.
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Old 01-22-05, 05:54 PM   #15
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I didn't, but I could have I suppose.

My setup is:

1 rear pannier with sleeping bag, tent, thermarest, pannier covers.
1 rear pannier with clothes.
1 front pannier that's essentially the 'kitchen'
1 front pannier that's odds and ends.
1 handlebar bag that's my 'office'.

There's enough room between the panniers to allow for a trunk bag. Generally, though, I twist a bungie between the two bags and use it as a clothes line to dry the previous days clothes (which I sink wash after making camp.)
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Old 01-22-05, 09:24 PM   #16
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Our insulated trunk bag is almost essential for me. I can carry my medications, blood glucose meter, test strips, etc. in it without having much worry regarding weather issues.

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Old 01-24-05, 11:34 AM   #17
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I don't even have a trunk bag.

Back in the days I cycled solo, I had smaller panniers and the top of rear rack was useful for the tent, sleeping bag and other stuff.

Now that I cycle with kids, I need much more than a trunk bag even for day rides. ON tours with my oldest daughter on trailercycle, I had:

- 42-L panniers in front
- 54-L panniers over the rear wheel, with tent posts in the right pocket
- tent itself folded and stored on the front part of the rear rack (the Piccolo is attached near the centre)
- sleeping bags in two panniers attached to the trailercycle, and mattress on the rearmost rack.

I like the expandability allowed by bungee cords on top of the rear rack. I also like the nylon straps on top of Arkel's T-42 panniers. They are useful to attach extra items for short distances, like stuff bought at the grocery store and needed for supper.
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Old 01-28-05, 10:08 PM   #18
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I used a Carradice - they sit fairly close to the bicycle so you can put stuff behind them.

http://ca.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mac...ca.jpg&.src=ph
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