Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    My Bikes
    Tout Terrain Rohloff/Gates Metropolitan; Felt Footprint
    Posts
    45
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Grip fatigue on tour?

    Hey all,

    I'm currently doing a tour of the west coast (Portland - San Diego), and am currently 1,200mi into it. I've had knee issues (iliotobial band friction syndrome) that I am now thankfully over, after having bought a foam roller.

    One remaining niggle, though, is my grip strength.

    After about three days on tour, I noticed I had little tremors and twitches in my fingers. That was due to me putting pressure on the central base of the hand when riding, so I stopped that and the tremors and twitches went away quickly.

    However, I've got some pretty massive grip fatigue. It's not affecting my riding in any way, but my thumb/index finger pinching grip is very weak. I can't eat with chopsticks, hold a wine glass by the stem in the normal way or any action that requires pinching (writing is ok, however).

    There's no pain, tingling, numbness or anything of that sort going on.

    I ride with padded gloves most of the time, but take them off just for variation at other times.

    I had my bike professionally fitted, and while they wanted to lower the stem a little bit (the saddle is more or less level with the top handlebars), everything else should be ok.

    This is my bike:


    Any ideas?

  2. #2
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    36,703
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You might try raising your handlebars a bit. And focus on dropping your shoulders and bending your elbows while you ride. Relax your upper body.

    One stretch I do to regain feeling in my fingers if they go numb on a long ride is to sit bolt upright, then put one hand/arm behind my back in an "L" shape. Vertical part of the "L" is my upper arm beside my body, horizontal part of the "L" is my forearm resting across my back at about waist level. Within seconds, the feeling returns to my hand. Then I repeat with the other arm. That might help your situation a bit too.

  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    35,788
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Maybe you need to trust the steering you get from the saddle, more

    and lighten the grip you may have in the handlebars,
    from one that may be too much ..
    It's not like holding onto a hammer (that you need to not fly out of your hand)


    i fitted on a half grab-on set on the upper, curve,
    but with aero levers and cable there I have used a set and a half of
    padded tape , and used split in half of 1 on the tops ,
    and then a whole piece of padded tape wrapped over the partial section.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 08-20-12 at 01:42 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NE Tx
    My Bikes
    Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial
    Posts
    2,548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lower the bar, the more pressure on the hands. When I rode an upright, the bars, at saddle height, were wrapped in pipe insulation foam. Much more ergonomically correct than skinny bars. Also used aerobars for another comfortable riding position. Solved all the hand pressure problems. Wish I could have solved the saddle problems.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  5. #5
    Macro Geek
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    My Bikes
    True North tourer (www.truenorthcycles.com), 2004; Miyata 1000, 1985
    Posts
    1,160
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Aerobars, like these:

    http://www.profile-design.com/profil...airstryke.html

    I nearly gave up touring in the early 1990s due to hand problems. I starting using Airstrykes in 1994. They saved my touring "career" by giving me a riding position that requires no gripping. On the road, I rely on them for up to 50% of a typical day.

    Just don't use aerobars in traffic, or any time you might need quick access to your brake levers!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    NE Tx
    My Bikes
    Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial
    Posts
    2,548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by acantor View Post
    Aerobars, like these:

    http://www.profile-design.com/profil...airstryke.html

    I nearly gave up touring in the early 1990s due to hand problems. I starting using Airstrykes in 1994. They saved my touring "career" by giving me a riding position that requires no gripping. On the road, I rely on them for up to 50% of a typical day.

    Just don't use aerobars in traffic, or any time you might need quick access to your brake levers!!!
    Exactly. Same model I used. Same results.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  7. #7
    Hot in China azesty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    China
    My Bikes
    Giant Lava
    Posts
    961
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Lots of good advice here as well as some very good links

    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...s-when-touring

    z

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Try shifting your grip. I wouldnt get the twitches, but the musculature in my hands began to change ever so slightly the couple months after buying wheels (no car only pedals).


    I've been a pianist most of my life so i have an intimate relationship with my hands. I started to drop my shoulders as mentioned in an above post. This helped a lot with my torso & breathe patterns. Then I began to grab side grips on the outsides of my bars, underhand grips, & grips in between certain fingers. I also stretch out my pinky fingers to just above my break levers while my thumb is pointing towards the stem. These little tricks have helped my hand fatigue greatly. p.s. I dont use any gloves unless its cold.
    Last edited by Thaddeus088; 08-21-12 at 09:40 PM. Reason: clarification derp

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •