Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 42
  1. #1
    Canadian Chick Aquakitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Couple generic Pacific Coast questions: Maps/Weather

    Hey there,
    I bought the book Bicycling the Pacific Coast: A Complete Route Guide, Canada to Mexico... should I bother getting the ACA maps as well? Book seems pretty detailed.

    I am planning on leaving end of Sept. I realize the weather is random, but what do you all think? Does it usually stay fairly mild? What's traffic like in Sept/Oct? FTR I am only going to San Fran this trip.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,541
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Today, here: NOAA, 7 days out..
    http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick...Field2=-123.83
    looks like I'll put my Rain gear back in my bike bags

    ODOT has free Coast bike route maps, but the ACA maps are treated for water resistance..

  3. #3
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Parkville, Md
    Posts
    7,693
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How much of the coast are you riding? Personally if I was doing The coast again I might skip Washington state and do more of California. I started in Seattle and finished in San Luis Obispo last time. The Washington part I did on the AC route didn't thrill me.

    The best map for the Oregon section is the free one from ODOT. Order it from them for free or pick it up in a bike shop there.

    The AC maps do the best job of listing currently available services. Quite a bit has changed since the book was last published even if you have the latest version, but you can get by with the book if you want. In that case call ahead to see if stuff is still there and open. Even with the AC or ODOT maps that is a good idea.

  4. #4
    Canadian Chick Aquakitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
    How much of the coast are you riding? Personally if I was doing The coast again I might skip Washington state and do more of California. I started in Seattle and finished in San Luis Obispo last time. The Washington part I did on the AC route didn't thrill me.

    The best map for the Oregon section is the free one from ODOT. Order it from them for free or pick it up in a bike shop there.

    The AC maps do the best job of listing currently available services. Quite a bit has changed since the book was last published even if you have the latest version, but you can get by with the book if you want. In that case call ahead to see if stuff is still there and open. Even with the AC or ODOT maps that is a good idea.

    Aye I usually do that anyways. Eh it would tweak my OCD if I skipped Washington (I read that somewhere else, oh wait, it was you! ACA forum thread comes up on Google ). We are stopping in San Fran to visit family no real time limit though.

    The ACA route has you go over those "islands" instead of down to Seattle, right? Seems like that would be fun. But then I like seeing lots of no one if possible, lol.
    I am not really too concerned about campsites you should see some of the places I have camped. I was wondering what would be open but I will get to that part eventually.

  5. #5
    Senior Member simplygib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Hard Rock Sport, Peugeot Triathlon, Schwinn Paramount Series 7
    Posts
    671
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most of the people I run into on the coast have that book. It's good, but parts are out of date as others have said. In general, if you keep the ocean on your right you can't go too wrong. As far as weather, it should be good that time of year, but expect occasional rain - more so in the north - less as you get further into California. In fact, it's about the perfect time of year for the CA coast. Lots of fog in summer, less in fall. But anything can happen, weather-wise.

  6. #6
    BF Avatar Zombie Hunter Jseis's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    SW Washington state on the ocean!
    My Bikes
    1973 Motobecane Grand Jubilee, 1981 Centurion Super LeMans, 2010 Gary Fisher Wahoo, '03 Colnago Dream Lux, several older family Treks
    Posts
    1,073
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've ridden cross country (Seattle to NY via Canada) and short sections of the coast route in Wa.

    September's a good month, mid October on is a crapshoot on weather. Coast route is a lot of short up and downs. I'd ride the whole thing, otherwise your just riding Ore or Ca and there's no bragging rights there. Besides, the best coast is in Wa (though basically off the beaten path), less people and definitely more rugged off the Olympic mts. 7 days spent from Bellimgham south can involve islands, Puget Sound, radical environment change (Sequim) and get your legs tuned up for the Ore/Cali headlands. 101 south of Astoria is busy with RV's and you alternate between stripped out 101 (Astoria to Seaside) with rural (Tilamook), then stripped out Lincoln City-Newport. South of Newport is more remote. The coast is rugged in all three states. SW storms can spring up with vicious SW head winds. Normal fall weather is NW afternoon breeze to stiff wind but not always a tailwind due to headland and valley effects. I've seen a few (dozens) of riders coming south from Puget Sound/Olympics and they all looked gassed as they've been on the road barely a week and rolling hills probably surprised them.

    In iPhone app like topo maps is good for land form and elevation changes. Most structure rides around private/KOA and state park campgrounds 'cause there can be long gaps between.
    Amerika, Land of the Very Brief.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    hmmm - looked at the ACAs. from Vancouver, BC to Astoria, OR the first half looks to be pretty scenic. through Bellingham, down the famed scenic Chuckanut Drive, out to Anacortes, down Whidbey Island across the Deception Pass bridge, Washington State Ferry to the Olympic Peninsula, staying east side of that and see lots of the Inland Waters of the Pacific Northwest (yes its the name of it) til you get to the bottom of Puget Sound. then lots of woods and hills, very much inland, to Astoria. second half ain't bad, its just that it pales in comparison to the first half and what you will on Oregon and California coast. traffic on some of the roads (Hwy 20 down Whidbey Island) will be heavy, but lots of cyclists and good shoulders too. you could detour west to the Washington Coast, adding some miles but some more ocean views. weather? moderate temps (50 at night, 70 during day) , maybe a little rain in Washington ... maybe not.

  8. #8
    Canadian Chick Aquakitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Jseis View Post
    I've ridden cross country (Seattle to NY via Canada) and short sections of the coast route in Wa.

    September's a good month, mid October on is a crapshoot on weather. Coast route is a lot of short up and downs. I'd ride the whole thing, otherwise your just riding Ore or Ca and there's no bragging rights there. Besides, the best coast is in Wa (though basically off the beaten path), less people and definitely more rugged off the Olympic mts. 7 days spent from Bellimgham south can involve islands, Puget Sound, radical environment change (Sequim) and get your legs tuned up for the Ore/Cali headlands. 101 south of Astoria is busy with RV's and you alternate between stripped out 101 (Astoria to Seaside) with rural (Tilamook), then stripped out Lincoln City-Newport. South of Newport is more remote. The coast is rugged in all three states. SW storms can spring up with vicious SW head winds. Normal fall weather is NW afternoon breeze to stiff wind but not always a tailwind due to headland and valley effects. I've seen a few (dozens) of riders coming south from Puget Sound/Olympics and they all looked gassed as they've been on the road barely a week and rolling hills probably surprised them.

    In iPhone app like topo maps is good for land form and elevation changes. Most structure rides around private/KOA and state park campgrounds 'cause there can be long gaps between.
    Quote Originally Posted by Altamont View Post
    hmmm - looked at the ACAs. from Vancouver, BC to Astoria, OR the first half looks to be pretty scenic. through Bellingham, down the famed scenic Chuckanut Drive, out to Anacortes, down Whidbey Island across the Deception Pass bridge, Washington State Ferry to the Olympic Peninsula, staying east side of that and see lots of the Inland Waters of the Pacific Northwest (yes its the name of it) til you get to the bottom of Puget Sound. then lots of woods and hills, very much inland, to Astoria. second half ain't bad, its just that it pales in comparison to the first half and what you will on Oregon and California coast. traffic on some of the roads (Hwy 20 down Whidbey Island) will be heavy, but lots of cyclists and good shoulders too. you could detour west to the Washington Coast, adding some miles but some more ocean views. weather? moderate temps (50 at night, 70 during day) , maybe a little rain in Washington ... maybe not.
    All sounds pretty much like what I figured. Thanks for the info, I think I will grab the maps, seems worth it and I like having lots of maps. I have a GPS/phone/computer so no problem there, but nothing like a good paper map!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    2,637
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    We started our Pacific Coast ride in Vancouver, BC going north to Lund and then heading south on the route described in "Bicycling the Pacific Coast." We came down Vancouver Island to Victoria, and then crossed into the U.S. at Port Angeles, Washington. We chose to ride the Hood Canal option rather than the coastal route through Washington. We were experiencing quite a bit of rain, and thought the "inland route" would be a little drier. The route to SF is pretty straight forward, and the information in the book is useful. In the more populated areas south of SF the route as described in the book seemed confusing at times, especially in the larger cities.

    We have completed 8 multi-week tours in various places on the Pacific Northwest Coast in the U.S. and Canada, including the Pacific Coast Route, and had some rain on 7 of the trips. All but one of those tours started after Labor Day.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Clarabelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Sequim, Washington on the Olympic Peninsula
    My Bikes
    Co-Motion Mocha, Fuji touring, Trex hybrid, Bike Friday Tandem Traveler
    Posts
    438
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
    Hey there,
    I bought the book Bicycling the Pacific Coast: A Complete Route Guide, Canada to Mexico... should I bother getting the ACA maps as well? Book seems pretty detailed.

    I am planning on leaving end of Sept. I realize the weather is random, but what do you all think? Does it usually stay fairly mild? What's traffic like in Sept/Oct? FTR I am only going to San Fran this trip.

    Thanks.
    I've ridden the Washington and Oregon portion several times, and for that, the book is all you need. September weather is usually good but there are no guarantees. October, especially from the middle on, can be a little iffy. It's a great ride, so enjoy.

  11. #11
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Parkville, Md
    Posts
    7,693
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
    The ACA route has you go over those "islands" instead of down to Seattle, right? Seems like that would be fun. But then I like seeing lots of no one if possible, lol.
    I am not really too concerned about campsites you should see some of the places I have camped. I was wondering what would be open but I will get to that part eventually.
    I hopped on the AC route by taking the ferry from Seattle to Bremmerton. The ferry ride was nice, but the ride from Bremmerton to Astoria was just OK at best. I personally would probably either try a more coastal route or skip Washington state next time. I would definitely prefer to do more of California than to do that part of Washington again, but since SF is a destination for you that may not make sense.

    I will add that others may like that section better than I did. OTOH, some Washington guys I met commented "We live in Washington and start in Astoria". Also I didn't see another tourist in Washington, but never camped alone in Oregon or California on that trip, so it must be less popular with at least some others.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,293
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's downhill all the way!

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    217
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
    I hopped on the AC route by taking the ferry from Seattle to Bremmerton. The ferry ride was nice, but the ride from Bremmerton to Astoria was just OK at best. I personally would probably either try a more coastal route or skip Washington state next time. I would definitely prefer to do more of California than to do that part of Washington again, but since SF is a destination for you that may not make sense.

    I will add that others may like that section better than I did. OTOH, some Washington guys I met commented "We live in Washington and start in Astoria". Also I didn't see another tourist in Washington, but never camped alone in Oregon or California on that trip, so it must be less popular with at least some others.
    so true - I do not know why the ACA doesn't re-route that course over to the coast, once you clear Puget Sound. everything from BC south to Hood Canal is nothing less than spectacular, cliffs along the water overlooking islands, ferry rides, bridges over high gorges, etc, but that inland part down to Oregon is horrible. you must have spoken to folks who started in Seattle. they would have missed the best parts.

  14. #14
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Eugene, OR
    My Bikes
    Road, touring and mountain
    Posts
    3,779
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you have the book, buying and packing the maps seem redundant. So the maps are waterproof....put the book in a plastic zip bag, it's not going to be THAT wet. I think that the ACA made their maps from the book anyway, IMHO you gain nothing with the maps.

    In Oregon all you need to do is follow these signs, they take you on the best route (the book route).

    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,155
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
    Hey there,
    I bought the book Bicycling the Pacific Coast: A Complete Route Guide, Canada to Mexico... should I bother getting the ACA maps as well? Book seems pretty detailed.
    I have both the book and the ACA maps and used them for a SF to LA ride a couple of years ago. I read the book before leaving, but left it at home and took the maps on the trip since they were lighter and took up less space. The route are pretty similar between the two. The book does a much better job of describing the main route, alternative routes, and attractions. The maps provide a more comprehensive list of campgrounds and services along the route.

    If I had it to do over again, I probably wouldn't purchase the ACA maps. I programmed the route into my GPS ahead of time and found I didn't spend much time looking at the maps. They're a nice back-up, but I don't think I looked at them more than once or twice on the entire trip.

  16. #16
    djb
    djb is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Montreal Canada
    Posts
    3,800
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    It's downhill all the way!
    Don't ever buy some Florida beach front property from this fellow....

  17. #17
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,541
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    AquaKitty can visit the WetDog, in Astoria..

    a town with 2 micro-breweries .. Ft George the other one.


    It's "a Nice Little Drinking Town, with a Fishing Problem".
    Last edited by fietsbob; 08-14-13 at 12:51 PM.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    My Bikes
    1995? Trek 830 (with mods); 1980ish Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As someone who has visited the Oregon Coast frequently over the last almost four decades in all seasons of the year, I have some comments on the weather. Going there in November we always pack some layers and some rain gear. Going camping in March we always pack some layers and some rain gear. Going in May we pack layers and rain gear. In July, we might pack one less layer, but we still bring the rain gear just in case. It can cloud up and rain any month of the year, but IN GENERAL your more rain-free period will be about mid-July until mid-August. That's also, unfortunately, when you'll run into more traffic. Higher traffic is generally around Astoria, then Seaside/Cannon Beach, and then Lincoln City and Newport. You'll find less traffic in between most of those, and less traffic the further you get away from the east-west highways that connect the coast with the interior of the state. The Oregon coast is great for scenery and beauty and not so much for careless skimpy swimsuit wearing beach-bumming.

    The ODOT map is excellent in many regards as it gives you profiles of the elevation changes (compressed for length quite a bit), vehicle count totals for different sections, and climate info. When I finally tick the Oregon Coast bike route off my bucket list I will take the ODOT map and a photocopy of the relevant pages out of my book on it.



    Tangent alert:
    The book, in my opinion, should have fewer errors considering its now in its 4th edition. It's not the Henry O. Hatfield Marine Science Center, people, but the Mark O. Hatfield Marine Science Center. It's not Humbolt County but Humboldt County, and that's just the two errors I caught in five minutes of skimming this morning. They aren't really material to the overall book, but the editor in me wants to redline a copy and send it back to the publisher with a request for a free copy of the fifth edition.

  19. #19
    Senior Member adventurepdx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    347
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SteamDonkey74 View Post
    Tangent alert:
    The book, in my opinion, should have fewer errors considering its now in its 4th edition...They aren't really material to the overall book, but the editor in me wants to redline a copy and send it back to the publisher with a request for a free copy of the fifth edition.
    I agree with that sentiment! Some errors carry over from eariler editions. I remember them misspelling Glisan St in Portland as "Olisan" for both the 3rd and 4th Editions.

    But to be fair, I've heard that there isn't a heck of a lot of money in these types of guidebooks, and publishers aren't likely to pony up enough of an advance to justify the amount of time and research needed for the book. I'm guessing that Kirkendall/Spring got through the first edition on their enthusiasm for doing the book. For each subsequent edition, the case may be less enthusiasm by the authors for rechecking/updating the route, rather it's more like obligation to update the information (and maybe pressure from the publisher, as they are unlikely to keep on wanting to reprint an edition that's several years old.) The last (Fourth) Edition came out in 2005, I'm wondering if there will be a Fifth Edition soon.
    http://urbanadventureleague.blogspot.com/ http://societyofthreespeeds.wordpress.com/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/urbanadventureleaguepdx/

  20. #20
    Canadian Chick Aquakitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I see the maps offer a GPX file and I just found this http://tsteven4.qwestoffice.net/maps...oastRoute.html . Anything in the maps that isn't on there? I am one of those annoying GPS addicts who plan everything out online then end up on a dirt road on top of a mountain trying to find the McDonalds because the GPS told me to.
    Seriously though, I have never seen an ACA map, and I can't even find an illegal image of it anywhere. Would be nice if they provided a sample.


    Glad you guys mentioned to take the coastal route now though... I will make sure to cut onto that part in the book as I am heading south from Van and not doing Van Isle (been there done that heh).
    Last edited by Aquakitty; 08-27-12 at 05:44 PM.

  21. #21
    Senior Member adventurepdx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    347
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
    Seriously though, I have never seen an ACA map, and I can't even find an illegal image of it anywhere. Would be nice if they provided a sample.
    If you go to their website, they have info on their maps here: http://adventurecycling.org/routes/maps.cfm

    They even have a sample image of it here: http://www.adventurecycling.org/routes/maplarge.cfm
    mapdetail_lg.jpg
    http://urbanadventureleague.blogspot.com/ http://societyofthreespeeds.wordpress.com/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/urbanadventureleaguepdx/

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    My Bikes
    1995? Trek 830 (with mods); 1980ish Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    AquaKitty,

    I got your PM but since I don't yet have 50 posts it won't let me respond. If you send me your email address via PM I'll contact you that way, or...?

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    4,952
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Aquakitty View Post
    ... But then I like seeing lots of no one if possible, lol.
    ...
    In that case, consider skipping both the book and ACA routes for a small portion of NorCal and head up and over to the Lost Coast. There are three roads into the Lost Coast, depending on whether you would feel like you had missed something if you skipped the Avenue of the Giants. You can either climb the backside of The Wall out of Ferndale (campground (Camp A.W. Way) between Petrolia and Honeydew), or come over Bull Creek Flats Rd/Mattole Rd after the Avenue, then over Wilder Ridge for both of those options. You can also wait until Briceland Thorn Rd to head on out (flattest option, but has more traffic than the first two). In either case, you either continue on Briceland Thorn Rd. to Usul Rd and then head south on a twenty-four mile dirt road completely devoid of traffic, or take the fork to Shelter Cove (two campgrounds and a store, but check on them first), and then get to Usul Rd. via the largely unpaved Chemise Mountain Rd. There is a campground on Usul Rd six miles from Hwy 1 (primitive, bring a water filter).

    The climbs on the Lost Coast are far steeper and longer than anything else on the Pacific Coast. You will definitely want some very low gearing and quality brakes. While there is very little traffic, the few people who are driving are unfailingly friendly. There is a tavern and store in Petrolia, but they aren't open very long hours and a store in Honeydew that opens around 9:00 A.M. The shower at Camp A.W. Way is just cold water, but you can always swim in the river instead or heat your own. I haven't taken the fork to Shelter Cove for years, so I'm not sure what is going on there. There used to be showers at the campgrounds, but who knows what is there now. Usul Rd. is wonderful. On the west side is wilderness and on the east side is a private hunting reserve. It is not unusual to see a couple of motorcycles on it and I have only seen one car ever. After days of being on Hwy 1 it is a fantastic change of pace.

    Oh, Usul Rd hits Hwy 1 at mp 90. Fort Bragg is at mp 60, so you are thirty miles from a good meal and cheap shower (state campground at Ft. Bragg) when you get to the end of Usul. I usually stop at one of the campgrounds between Usul and Ft. Bragg to clean my chain since twenty-four miles of red clay dust (or sticky clay mud) can really make a mess of it. (Don't drink all your Tri-Flow before you get there!). I also change back to road tires when I clean up my chain. If you tour on 32mm or wider, you might be able to ride Usul when it is dry without going to off-road tires, but I roll 25mm or 28mm which just won't do on that road. (Especially the time I got to it after 7 inches of rain had fallen overnight.)

    If you want more detail, PM me and I'll make up a ridewithgps map. If you want to maximize your off-road miles, talk to Asanacycles. He rode all the gravel roads thereabouts sometime within the past two years. I usually ride from Eugene to Davis twice a year, but I didn't go this year so any recent changes are outside my ken.

  24. #24
    Canadian Chick Aquakitty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
    I hopped on the AC route by taking the ferry from Seattle to Bremmerton. The ferry ride was nice, but the ride from Bremmerton to Astoria was just OK at best. I personally would probably either try a more coastal route or skip Washington state next time. I would definitely prefer to do more of California than to do that part of Washington again, but since SF is a destination for you that may not make sense.

    I will add that others may like that section better than I did. OTOH, some Washington guys I met commented "We live in Washington and start in Astoria". Also I didn't see another tourist in Washington, but never camped alone in Oregon or California on that trip, so it must be less popular with at least some others.
    Quote Originally Posted by Altamont View Post
    so true - I do not know why the ACA doesn't re-route that course over to the coast, once you clear Puget Sound. everything from BC south to Hood Canal is nothing less than spectacular, cliffs along the water overlooking islands, ferry rides, bridges over high gorges, etc, but that inland part down to Oregon is horrible. you must have spoken to folks who started in Seattle. they would have missed the best parts.
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    I have both the book and the ACA maps and used them for a SF to LA ride a couple of years ago. I read the book before leaving, but left it at home and took the maps on the trip since they were lighter and took up less space. The route are pretty similar between the two. The book does a much better job of describing the main route, alternative routes, and attractions. The maps provide a more comprehensive list of campgrounds and services along the route.

    If I had it to do over again, I probably wouldn't purchase the ACA maps. I programmed the route into my GPS ahead of time and found I didn't spend much time looking at the maps. They're a nice back-up, but I don't think I looked at them more than once or twice on the entire trip.
    Quote Originally Posted by B. Carfree View Post
    In that case, consider skipping both the book and ACA routes for a small portion of NorCal and head up and over to the Lost Coast. There are three roads into the Lost Coast, depending on whether you would feel like you had missed something if you skipped the Avenue of the Giants. You can either climb the backside of The Wall out of Ferndale (campground (Camp A.W. Way) between Petrolia and Honeydew), or come over Bull Creek Flats Rd/Mattole Rd after the Avenue, then over Wilder Ridge for both of those options. You can also wait until Briceland Thorn Rd to head on out (flattest option, but has more traffic than the first two). In either case, you either continue on Briceland Thorn Rd. to Usul Rd and then head south on a twenty-four mile dirt road completely devoid of traffic, or take the fork to Shelter Cove (two campgrounds and a store, but check on them first), and then get to Usul Rd. via the largely unpaved Chemise Mountain Rd. There is a campground on Usul Rd six miles from Hwy 1 (primitive, bring a water filter).

    The climbs on the Lost Coast are far steeper and longer than anything else on the Pacific Coast. You will definitely want some very low gearing and quality brakes. While there is very little traffic, the few people who are driving are unfailingly friendly. There is a tavern and store in Petrolia, but they aren't open very long hours and a store in Honeydew that opens around 9:00 A.M. The shower at Camp A.W. Way is just cold water, but you can always swim in the river instead or heat your own. I haven't taken the fork to Shelter Cove for years, so I'm not sure what is going on there. There used to be showers at the campgrounds, but who knows what is there now. Usul Rd. is wonderful. On the west side is wilderness and on the east side is a private hunting reserve. It is not unusual to see a couple of motorcycles on it and I have only seen one car ever. After days of being on Hwy 1 it is a fantastic change of pace.

    Oh, Usul Rd hits Hwy 1 at mp 90. Fort Bragg is at mp 60, so you are thirty miles from a good meal and cheap shower (state campground at Ft. Bragg) when you get to the end of Usul. I usually stop at one of the campgrounds between Usul and Ft. Bragg to clean my chain since twenty-four miles of red clay dust (or sticky clay mud) can really make a mess of it. (Don't drink all your Tri-Flow before you get there!). I also change back to road tires when I clean up my chain. If you tour on 32mm or wider, you might be able to ride Usul when it is dry without going to off-road tires, but I roll 25mm or 28mm which just won't do on that road. (Especially the time I got to it after 7 inches of rain had fallen overnight.)

    If you want more detail, PM me and I'll make up a ridewithgps map. If you want to maximize your off-road miles, talk to Asanacycles. He rode all the gravel roads thereabouts sometime within the past two years. I usually ride from Eugene to Davis twice a year, but I didn't go this year so any recent changes are outside my ken.

    Dang, That sounds awesome! There is one problem however... the spouse. He is not that into long episodes of solitude and dirt roads. Don't ask about the last 600km rail-trail trip we did, with hours of 2% grade in the trees on dirt roads and sand pits rutted by A(sshole)TV'ers. I was in heaven (mostly, except for the odd annoying ATV) and he was bored out of his mind, so now we kind of compromise on where to go, lol. I will see what he thinks of a little dirt for a change of pace. One thing we don't lack in BC is dirt/logging roads and rutted pavement!

    @adventurepdx - Oops, how did I not see that?

    @SteamDonkey74 - No worries you can answer here or I'll pm my addy

    If anyone has Pacific Coast 1,2,3 for sale I would take it off your hands.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    My Bikes
    1995? Trek 830 (with mods); 1980ish Fuji S12-S
    Posts
    90
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, in response to your question in the PM (which I can't technically respond to until my post count is 50 - I better get busy with all the Nigerian inheritance messages in the Foo forum, I guess), it can get a bit chilly in the fall at night, down into the 40s (F) and possibly, occasionally, into the 30s. You likely won't need you arctic rated sleeping bag unless you get cold easily, but you'll need something more (layers, heavier bag) than just the lightest summer bag.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •