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Old 09-27-12, 01:24 AM   #1
yosarian9
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How do you deal with your loaded bike while changing a flat tire?

If you're KM's from a bike stand, do you carefully lie the bike on its side or do you have a different solution?
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Old 09-27-12, 01:44 AM   #2
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No I carry my bike all the way back home on my shoulders so I can put it in the stand.

I will lie my bike down, non drive side, in the grass. If its my front that flatted I lean the rear wheel up against a tree or guardrail.
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Old 09-27-12, 01:50 AM   #3
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Dont eat your breakfast if it smells like pee...and thanks!
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Old 09-27-12, 02:49 AM   #4
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dont ask silly questions and expect a serious answer without some friendly sarcasm first.
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Old 09-27-12, 03:10 AM   #5
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I remove the panniers and then simply remove the wheel just as I would on my other bikes if I get a puncture whilst out riding. I don't use the work stand at home either for punctures.

On my last tour, the Chasing the Dirt tour I got two punctures in the tyre fitted to the Extrawheel Voyager. Life is easy with the Voyager. I just removed the panniers, lifted the trailer up and removed the wheel. With the last puncture I simply fitted a new tube then when I got up the road to a river with water in it (not that common here) I found the hole and fixed it so I had the tube as a spare again.



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Old 09-27-12, 04:14 AM   #6
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dont ask silly questions and expect a serious answer without some friendly sarcasm first.
What's silly about the question the OP asked? It's an age-old issue for a loaded bike.
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Old 09-27-12, 04:50 AM   #7
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In this case, I laid the bike down on the rear pannier, derailleur towards the ground, and removed the wheel horizontally. Having the derailleur down meant the chain was supposed to swing free of the cassette, although the theory doesn't quite work as well in practice. The Thorn's dropouts also are a tight fit for the hub, which doesn't help.

The picture was taken outside the Bordeaux railway station about two weeks ago.

I've used all sorts of other methods, and the rear wheel is by far the most challenging if you run rear panniers.

I've left the panniers on, and lifted the bike off the wheel, then propped it against a post or tree, which is not particularly good for the chainring or rear derailleur. I've removed the panniers and done the same. I've turned the bike upside down, but then that requires protection of the seat and shifters if on a gravelly surface.

None seems to be quite satisfactory enough. And I do use a stand at home when changing out wheels and tyres.
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Old 09-27-12, 05:30 AM   #8
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Actually it is a good question. I have read where folks do all kinds of stuff in this regard. I am always kind of amazed when folks quote extremely long repair times and say what an ordeal it is. When asked they describe a long process that includes removing the panniers.

Me, with my fully loaded pannier setup, I lay it on the non drive side pop the wheel off fix the flat and am usually under way again in 5-10 minutes depending on how hard it is to find the offending object in the tire. On rare occasion the delay can be longer, but usually not.

With my lighter rigs with dry bags instead of panniers, I most often do the same, but have also on occasion inverted the bike and set it on the bars and saddle.

I am not a fan of kick stands, but the two legged stands look like they can work well as a work stand.
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Old 09-27-12, 05:36 AM   #9
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If there's two of you, it can be a bit easier too ... one can hold the bicycle while the other removes the wheels. And then lay the bicycle down.

If you go the pannier removal method, which I have in the past, it's not that time consuming. It shouldn't take anything more than about a minute to remove a pannier.
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Old 09-27-12, 05:45 AM   #10
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I am not a fan of kick stands, but the two legged stands look like they can work well as a work stand.
I haven't used mine in the context of a puncture but it has been handy for other bike maintenance such as lubing the chain.

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Old 09-27-12, 06:04 AM   #11
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If you're KM's from a bike stand, do you carefully lie the bike on its side or do you have a different solution?
Often, on any of the bikes, I just lay it non driveside down. A tree branch to hang the bike from the saddle's nose works well also.

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Old 09-27-12, 10:26 AM   #12
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I have cantilever brakes and I pretty much need to remove the panniers to release them. The one time I tried to do it without removing panniers was a real cluster, so to speak.
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Old 09-27-12, 10:44 AM   #13
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I have cantilever brakes and I pretty much need to remove the panniers to release them. The one time I tried to do it without removing panniers was a real cluster, so to speak.
Really? I have a hard time picturing the bags as being in the way of that. Is that the case for you with front, rear, or both? On any of the setup I have used my panniers have never even been close to the brakes on either front or rear. I never ran extremely large panniers though, so maybe that is the difference. Or maybe with non-low rider front racks?
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Old 09-27-12, 10:56 AM   #14
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I have cantis but have no problem removing the punctured wheel with the luggage in place, driveside up (to prevent damage and contamination of the chain).
I have horizontal dropouts and usually re-insert the wheel uninflated.

Take care with fluids, esp fuel bottles in your panniers.
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Old 09-27-12, 12:07 PM   #15
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I have horizontal dropouts and usually re-insert the wheel uninflated.
Heh. The leader of our small x-country tour group once spent 30 min. trying to put his rear wheel back in place after changing a flat and inflating the tire. A couple of us rolled up and immediately saw that he had not opened the QR of his rear brake. He was able to remove the wheel with the flat but bot replace it with an inflated tire. The guy was a complete dolt. We had him fired and replaced.

One mistake I made once was positioning the wheel's QR in such a way that the rack interfered with opening it. Fortunately, I was able to rotate it without having to remove the rack. Never made that mistake again.
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Old 09-27-12, 12:20 PM   #16
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.... have also on occasion inverted the bike and set it on the bars and saddle.
Inverting the bike with all equipment attached is my preferred flat repair method. It also provides a chance to check spoke condition and adjust spokes and /or rear derailleur as needed. I also support a tarp for shelter with the bike in this position. This also is anti-bike theft deterrent.
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Old 09-27-12, 12:33 PM   #17
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Inverting the bike with all equipment attached is my preferred flat repair method. It also provides a chance to check spoke condition and adjust spokes and /or rear derailleur as needed. I also support a tarp for shelter with the bike in this position. This also is anti-bike theft deterrent.
I got a flat on my last trip going over some glass. The way I fix a flat is the same way I always do.

1) Remove water bottles and front handelbar bag.
2) Pick up bike and stand it on its saddle and handlebars. When you don't have panniers this is easy.
3) Remove wheel, remember to open up the brakes.
4) Remove inner tube and save for possible future patching.
5) Check tire for sharp things. remove any sharp things.
6) Install new tube and inflate the tire a bit.
7) Put wheel back on and finish inflating tire, remember to close brakes........
8) pick up bike and put on 2 wheels again.

Last edited by nun; 09-27-12 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 09-27-12, 12:36 PM   #18
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I remove all the panniers and handlebar bag and turn the bike upside down. It really isn't a tough thing to do.
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Old 09-27-12, 08:34 PM   #19
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It takes about 30 seconds to unload the bike.

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Old 09-28-12, 01:44 AM   #20
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It takes about 30 seconds to unload the bike.
+1
We all know how to fix a flat... Lay the bike down, stand it on its seat and handlebars, lean it against a tree... What difference does it make? Whatever works for you.
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Old 09-28-12, 01:00 PM   #21
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Unload it, turn it upside down, fix the flat, reload it if rear. Nearly always. If front, lie it on side loaded. Rarely. Tire wires 95% of time. When not on tour, always turn it upside down.
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Old 09-28-12, 01:36 PM   #22
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I remove all the panniers and handlebar bag and turn the bike upside down. It really isn't a tough thing to do.
Same here. I can pop all my ortliebs off in about 10 seconds. No big deal.
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Old 09-28-12, 02:37 PM   #23
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Trying to remember .. minus fast removal QR bags and not going hyper-light, kit.

if using forethought? open the axle QR, lay the load down on the left,
Der side up. tire will already be flat, don't need to open the brakes.

mend puncture/replace tube, re istall wheel .. without inflating it first
so You still don't have to open the brakes .. then inflate the tire..
stand the bike up, reach down and close the QR on the wheel.

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-28-12 at 02:41 PM.
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Old 09-28-12, 03:23 PM   #24
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I normally don't even take the wheel off....pop the bead on one side of the tire,remove tube,locate hole,patch tube,check tire for crap,insert tube,push tire back on rim,pump it up.

If the tube is real bad,then I remove the wheel/tire.
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Old 09-28-12, 06:45 PM   #25
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Unload it, turn it upside down, fix the flat, reload it if rear. Nearly always. If front, lie it on side loaded. Rarely. Tire wires 95% of time. When not on tour, always turn it upside down.
I may be Captain Dashboard, but I'd rather lay the bike on its side than risk screwing up all the things I've got on the bars -- headlight, speedo, brifters. But a flat isn't worth more than a concentrated huff of annoyance, except maybe when it's getting ready to rain.
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