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Old 10-17-12, 05:52 AM   #1
bud16415
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(45-42-24) X (12,14,16,18,21,24,28,32,36) = :o)

45-42-24 X 12,14,16,18,21,24,28,32,36

In another gearing thread a few weeks ago (Touring with a double) I suggested I wanted to try an old school ďHalf step with GrannyĒ and do it with a modern 9 speed cassette and STI shifters. With some help from the folks over on the Bicycle Mechanics Forum I went ahead and bought a 45t Rocket (Chop Saw like) chainring off Amazon for $14. No ramps no pins 3/32 width. Some of the possible problems were lack of pins and ramps, tooth depth too deep as itís a single speed ring and FD designed for a 10 to 12 tooth lift and I only needed a 3 tooth jump. Happy to report none of these became an issue. I was able to drop my FD about 3/8 of an inch keeping the inner shift plate as close to the 42t ring as I could without rubbing when it shoves the chain over onto the 45t ring. There is still a gap between the outer shift plate and the new big ring, but the shift is as smooth as butter in both directions. Lowering the FD put it in a better place even with the granny ring and eliminated all the trims on all the rings with the GI listed below that are the only ones I ever use. I may still shorten the chain (donít know) it does go slack on the smallest cogs but I donít know if thatís a problem as the RD is nicely angled to use all the cassette with both larger rings even though I donít see cross chaining off the 45t.

Doing the half step shift is really simple and in riding it I donít try and run up and down the half step pattern like the old 10 speed days, but use it as a simple one shift in the front or a double shift front and back to get an in-between gear. The double shift is simple to think about as its ether both silver levers or both black levers. The front shift feels every bit as smooth as a rear shift. The shift up from the 24t granny to the 42t was always a tough shift but lowering the FD seemed to make that smoother also.

The unexpected result of this is benefit of the straighter chain line on the 3 smallest cogs. I didnít think too much about that ahead of time. But it was the first thing I noticed as I never had much use for those cogs off the old 52t. That straight chain line feels very smooth compared to getting close to the same GI coming off the center ring. It could be just a new smooth ring with little wear but others tell me itís the straighter line.

I think this is a keeper for me and I donít see myself going back or dropping the outer ring altogether. I might try and fit something like a 48t chain protector to the chop saw ring, for looks and keeping my pant leg clean. Not sure yet.

Well just wanted to post what I ended with and photos below in case anyone wants to try something similar.

My Granny without cross chain will give me this GI range. (6 gears)
17.7
20.0
22.8
26.6
30.4
35.5

And my main rings with half step will give me these without cross chaining. (15 gears)The ones shown with the minus sign are the new half steps off the 45t.
31.4
35.3
40.4
47.1
- 50.5
53.9
- 57.7
62.8
- 67.3
70.7
- 75.7
80.8
- 86.6
94.3
- 101.0





.
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Old 10-17-12, 07:18 AM   #2
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I believe that half-step stuff comes from my youth when bikes had 4 or 5 spd freewheels and you wanted to maximize the spread and get as many useful gears out of the limited range that you could. I donít find this kind of nonsense necessary with 2 or 3 front and 8, 9 or 10 rear. I like your 12-36 cluster and use it myself, but I use 20-32-42 chainrings and now that I am using the 36 rear, I could probably easily get by with a 22 granny. But I am now an old geezer and need low gears for the times when I am tired at the end of a long day and am climbing a nice long steep climb.
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Old 10-17-12, 07:46 AM   #3
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good stuff.

How do you like your Windsor? I have one too.
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Old 10-17-12, 08:05 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by bud16415 View Post
45-42-24 X 12,14,16,18,21,24,28,32,36



Doing the half step shift is really simple and in riding it I don’t try and run up and down the half step pattern like the old 10 speed days, but use it as a simple one shift in the front or a double shift front and back to get an in-between gear. The double shift is simple to think about as its ether both silver levers or both black levers. The front shift feels every bit as smooth as a rear shift. The shift up from the 24t granny to the 42t was always a tough shift but lowering the FD seemed to make that smoother also.

.
Nice set up. I'd be a bit concerned with the 42 to 24 gap, it's not a capacity issue for a triple derailleur, but watch out for dropping the chain. This sort of arrangement needs you to fiddle with the derailleur height, but once that's done they are great and it's nice to be different from the crowd and know that you are riding something of your own design. Did you consider a 45t TA ring, that would be nice......but they are hellishly expensive.
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Old 10-17-12, 08:40 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by ClemY View Post
I believe that half-step stuff comes from my youth when bikes had 4 or 5 spd freewheels and you wanted to maximize the spread and get as many useful gears out of the limited range that you could. I don’t find this kind of nonsense necessary with 2 or 3 front and 8, 9 or 10 rear. I like your 12-36 cluster and use it myself, but I use 20-32-42 chainrings and now that I am using the 36 rear, I could probably easily get by with a 22 granny. But I am now an old geezer and need low gears for the times when I am tired at the end of a long day and am climbing a nice long steep climb.

ClemY

Let me try and explain my thought process with this and I also consider myself well into the “old geezer” category. I tried a mountain crank just like you suggested 22,32,42 early on with both my 11-32 and my 12-36 cassettes. What I found early on was with 9 cogs in the back that covered a wide range such as these mtn cassettes do, with the correct center ring based on my strength and cadence, I could mainly stay on my center ring. Cascading up and down the cassette I had range for every type riding I do on the bike both loaded and unloaded. The bike came with a 42 center ring that was just a little high until I tried the 12-36. At that point with a 42t crank I had GI between 31 to 94. With the 32t center ring I got GI 24 to 71. Maybe if I was more of a spinner a lower center would be my sweet spot but after a lot of thought about where I wanted my cadence and speeds to be I found 42t to give me the widest possible usable span without doing a front shift. So your point and mine are the same you don’t need half step in today’s age. I could throw away my big ring and never look back, with a 1 x 9 with a granny.

When I had the mtn crank on I couldn’t say that because my starting point (average gear) wasn’t in the center of my center ring. It was split between my two rings. And many times forcing cross chaining. The shifting seems complicated because people remember half stepping as the way they had to shift in the old days and with doing double shifts with downtube shifters. For me the mountain crank was much more complicated shifting because when I would be riding near the transition point I had to think ok shift up to the big ring FD then drop down 3 or 4 on the RD.

I wanted this so I didn’t have to shift the front. And the only reason to do a front shift is to give me one higher gear, give me a straight chain line on the high gears like the mtn crank also does. But a much straighter line on the common gears in the center. And because it’s a wide spaced cassette the ability to have the in between gears when I want them with a simple shift pattern easy to remember.

I don’t want anyone to think I’m suggesting this for them. I just wanted to put the idea out there and why I like it.
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Old 10-17-12, 08:53 AM   #6
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ClemY

Let me try and explain my thought process with this and I also consider myself well into the ďold geezerĒ category. I tried a mountain crank just like you suggested 22,32,42 early on with both my 11-32 and my 12-36 cassettes. What I found early on was with 9 cogs in the back that covered a wide range such as these mtn cassettes do, with the correct center ring based on my strength and cadence, I could mainly stay on my center ring. Cascading up and down the cassette I had range for every type riding I do on the bike both loaded and unloaded. The bike came with a 42 center ring that was just a little high until I tried the 12-36. At that point with a 42t crank I had GI between 31 to 94. With the 32t center ring I got GI 24 to 71. Maybe if I was more of a spinner a lower center would be my sweet spot but after a lot of thought about where I wanted my cadence and speeds to be I found 42t to give me the widest possible usable span without doing a front shift. So your point and mine are the same you donít need half step in todayís age. I could throw away my big ring and never look back, with a 1 x 9 with a granny.
I've found 42t combined with an 11/34 cassette to be an excellent "do it almost all" set up. I have a 26t bail out granny, but that 42t chainring is great for touring with a wide range MTB cassette.

http://wheelsofchance.org/2009/08/28...-the-question/
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Old 10-17-12, 09:06 AM   #7
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RB!-Luvr
I got it off CL as the frame was correct size I wanted, little on the French fit side. I was building up an old KHS mid 80’s mountain bike into a touring bike at the time and around here a used touring bike is rare. I loved some of what the Windsor offered and hated that road triple. It took a while to get the fit right and a bit longer to fine tune the gearing. If I bought it as an around town bike I think I would have changed little. I have suggested them to bigger guys looking for road bike feel but a little more relaxed. Adding the fenders and racks with the wider tires and 36 spoke wheels it’s a pretty bullet proof commuting / touring bike up here in the rust belt. Rough roads and pot holes.
If there was one complaint I have about the Windsor was the spokes / wheel build of an mail order bike. I went thru a year of spoke popping before I had them rebuilt with DT spokes hand built. I don’t think the spokes that came with it were the problem and I recommend people have the wheels checked first thing.

Nun
Thanks for posting. I know you like a 42t ring as well, and there is really a difference in feel on the smallest cogs from the outside position.
I did look at the more expensive 45t rings and with not knowing if I would like this I went the cheap way first. I was quite impressed with the ring I did buy for the price and comparing the tooth form I can’t see any difference. Tiny bit more weight maybe. And like I said 3 teeth jump is really smooth without pins.
The 24 to 42 jump has always been big and I do run a chain catcher and it’s never missed so they work and are highly recommended. Climbing up onto the 42 is always a soft shift for me. I have found the 42, 45 shift works ok under power both ways. But I think my brain automatically has me back off a tad.
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Old 10-17-12, 09:18 AM   #8
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http://wheelsofchance.org/2009/08/28...-the-question/

What he said.

Nun thanks for the link.
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Old 10-17-12, 10:01 AM   #9
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I have been using one and a half step gearing for about 8 years on my LHT. When I built up another touring bike 2 years ago, I decided that I liked it so much that I used the same exact gearing on that bike too. I use a 52/42/24 front with 11/12/14/16/18/21/26/32 eight speed rear.



I do not use the 2 most cross chained gears with each chainring, thus I only use 18 of the possible 24 gears. This gives me this kind of gearing shown in the chart, lowest gear plotted on the left and highest gear plotted on the right. The Y axis is gear inches with a tire that has a diameter of a 26X1.5 Schwalbe Marathon tire, the color coding is for which chainring is used for that gear and the key to color coding is on the right of the graph.



I used half step on one bike the I rode from the late 1970s until about 12 years ago. It took a while to get used to one and a half step after using half step for all of those years, but I eventually got used to it. I tried substituting a 46t chainring for the 52 to get half step gearing, but I bought an uncompilable ring and gave up on that experiment, the problem was thickness of the ring and not the toothcount.

Bottom line - I concur that it is GREAT to have a wide selection of gears in the range where you want them. Unladen, I am in the range of 60 to 90 gear inches over 90 percent of the time. With a camping gear load, I spend 90 percent of my time in the 50 to 80 gear inch range. So this setup results in almost half of my gears being evenly spaced throughout those ranges where I spend almost all of my time. Thus, if there is a slight change of grade or change in windage, it is very easy for me to compensate for that minor change by making a slight gear shift. The 24t gives me the bail out gears that I need for the steeper hills. And, I occasionally use the highest two gears when I have a long shallow downhill which is not that uncommon on some of the rail to trail routes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClemY View Post
... ... I don’t find this kind of nonsense necessary with 2 or 3 front and 8, 9 or 10 rear. ... ...
Please be nice. Nobody is telling you that you have to buy it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
Nice set up. I'd be a bit concerned with the 42 to 24 gap, it's not a capacity issue for a triple derailleur, but watch out for dropping the chain. This sort of arrangement needs you to fiddle with the derailleur height, but once that's done they are great and ... ...
I use a chain catcher to help keep from dropping the chain when I shift from teh 42t to the 24t. I agree that the shift from the 24t up to the 42t is not a smooth shift, but I am only on the 24t chainring for the worst hills. Thus, I do not make this upshift very often. I almost always can make this shift over a distance of less than 30 feet. A friction front shifter is needed for this.
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Old 10-17-12, 10:19 AM   #10
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That's a cool setup. I like it. Our tandem has a 12-34 in back and 52-39-26 in front. I run mostly from the 52. I hardly ever use the 39. Our 39 sees use mostly as a transition ring between the 52 and the 26. The only thing I don't like about our gearing is the 10 beat cadence difference when shifting in the back. PITA. You've solved that and good on you.
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Old 10-17-12, 11:09 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I have been using one and a half step gearing for about 8 years on my LHT. When I built up another touring bike 2 years ago, I decided that I liked it so much that I used the same exact gearing on that bike too. I use a 52/42/24 front with 11/12/14/16/18/21/26/32 eight speed rear.



I do not use the 2 most cross chained gears with each chainring, thus I only use 18 of the possible 24 gears. This gives me this kind of gearing shown in the chart, lowest gear plotted on the left and highest gear plotted on the right. The Y axis is gear inches with a tire that has a diameter of a 26X1.5 Schwalbe Marathon tire, the color coding is for which chainring is used for that gear and the key to color coding is on the right of the graph.



I used half step on one bike the I rode from the late 1970s until about 12 years ago. It took a while to get used to one and a half step after using half step for all of those years, but I eventually got used to it. I tried substituting a 46t chainring for the 52 to get half step gearing, but I bought an uncompilable ring and gave up on that experiment, the problem was thickness of the ring and not the toothcount.

Bottom line - I concur that it is GREAT to have a wide selection of gears in the range where you want them. Unladen, I am in the range of 60 to 90 gear inches over 90 percent of the time. With a camping gear load, I spend 90 percent of my time in the 50 to 80 gear inch range. So this setup results in almost half of my gears being evenly spaced throughout those ranges where I spend almost all of my time. Thus, if there is a slight change of grade or change in windage, it is very easy for me to compensate for that minor change by making a slight gear shift. The 24t gives me the bail out gears that I need for the steeper hills. And, I occasionally use the highest two gears when I have a long shallow downhill which is not that uncommon on some of the rail to trail routes.



Please be nice. Nobody is telling you that you have to buy it.



I use a chain catcher to help keep from dropping the chain when I shift from teh 42t to the 24t. I agree that the shift from the 24t up to the 42t is not a smooth shift, but I am only on the 24t chainring for the worst hills. Thus, I do not make this upshift very often. I almost always can make this shift over a distance of less than 30 feet. A friction front shifter is needed for this.
I was only speaking for myself. You can do what ever feels right to you.
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Old 10-17-12, 11:11 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Tourist in MSN View Post
I have been using one and a half step gearing for about 8 years on my LHT. When I built up another touring bike 2 years ago, I decided that I liked it so much that I used the same exact gearing on that bike too. I use a 52/42/24 front with 11/12/14/16/18/21/26/32 eight speed rear.



I do not use the 2 most cross chained gears with each chainring, thus I only use 18 of the possible 24 gears. This gives me this kind of gearing shown in the chart, lowest gear plotted on the left and highest gear plotted on the right. The Y axis is gear inches with a tire that has a diameter of a 26X1.5 Schwalbe Marathon tire, the color coding is for which chainring is used for that gear and the key to color coding is on the right of the graph.



I used half step on one bike the I rode from the late 1970s until about 12 years ago. It took a while to get used to one and a half step after using half step for all of those years, but I eventually got used to it. I tried substituting a 46t chainring for the 52 to get half step gearing, but I bought an uncompilable ring and gave up on that experiment, the problem was thickness of the ring and not the toothcount.

Bottom line - I concur that it is GREAT to have a wide selection of gears in the range where you want them. Unladen, I am in the range of 60 to 90 gear inches over 90 percent of the time. With a camping gear load, I spend 90 percent of my time in the 50 to 80 gear inch range. So this setup results in almost half of my gears being evenly spaced throughout those ranges where I spend almost all of my time. Thus, if there is a slight change of grade or change in windage, it is very easy for me to compensate for that minor change by making a slight gear shift. The 24t gives me the bail out gears that I need for the steeper hills. And, I occasionally use the highest two gears when I have a long shallow downhill which is not that uncommon on some of the rail to trail routes.



Please be nice. Nobody is telling you that you have to buy it.



I use a chain catcher to help keep from dropping the chain when I shift from teh 42t to the 24t. I agree that the shift from the 24t up to the 42t is not a smooth shift, but I am only on the 24t chainring for the worst hills. Thus, I do not make this upshift very often. I almost always can make this shift over a distance of less than 30 feet. A friction front shifter is needed for this.


Tourist in MSN

You are just about exactly where I was other than tire size. And I was quite happy with the one and a half step as well. I started with a 30t as granny and wanted to go to 24t but the reviews were sketchy with anything less than 26t so I did that and it left me just a little shy of the lowest gear I wished for after trying the mountain crank with a 22t granny on my 11-32 cassette. That’s when I found the 12-36 and thought that 36 will make up for the 26t. I was at the bike shop one night and saw a bunch of rings hanging on a hook and asked to look thru them and there was my 24t marked with a 30 year old price tag. I told the guy want to sell this or hang it 30 more years. I was pretty sure after using the 26 with index I could make it work. I’m really glad it did now because the index works so well on the half step pair.
When I had the mountain crank on I experimented a lot with the super low granny gears it gave me and my cadence on some really steep hills around here. I forget now but at one point I was at 15.5 GI or something like that and I could climb the north face of El Capitan, but I was spinning my brains out just keeping from tipping over. I figured out for me my get off and push GI was 18. The beauty of the wide cassette is I get 6 granny gears to pick from going as hi as 36 GI. And now that I can shorten my chain I can get one more taking me to 40 GI. That might be the reason I will shorten it in fact. With the 24 being a bit of a shift it’s nice on a rolling climb to have a range of granny gears to pick from. One of the reasons a mega range cassette never appealed to me.

When I went to the 26t I added the chain minder (plastic tooth type) I never knew if it was doing much but after a time I took a close look and there is wear and tear on the catcher so those would have been thrown chains I’m sure. With it I have never had one.

Like you I had that super high 120 or something GI and I also would use it on long downhill’s keeping moving. The 101 GI I have now will be more than enough I feel. And if my legs get cold I can soft pedal and coast as it will take me up to about 30 MPH on a grade at 100 RPM before I run out.

Sounds like you could be tempted to go back to half step. ;o)
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Old 11-02-12, 07:39 PM   #13
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Awesome. Glad to see some folks still remember the half step dance with granny. I still have a Motobecane tandem stored away with that gear design built up from the TA Cyclotourist cranks it came over with. I had another one that I experimented with (circa 1974-75) to make it with 4 chain rings on the front (something like 22-40-50-56) and 5 cogs on the rear (a mod'd 14-34 freewheel). I did the build work in prep for a trip across the plains and then up the Rockies and I got it working well enough, but the trip never happened due to life problems elsewhere. I do remember trying a run of a big spring from the RD arm up to the underside of the bottom bracket and lengthening the RD arm about an inch, all to help wind up all the old heavy chain. I eventually concluding that all the fuss wasn't really worth it and went back to the earlier 3x5 setup before someone stole that bike. I think the extra, extra long French bottom bracket is still in one of my boxes somewhere.
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Old 11-02-12, 11:27 PM   #14
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This is a good read. As I had started on a 420 with a half step and rarely found use of the granny, too. I do not spin when riding and like a good gear transition. This has me rethinking my current 520 with its 48 36 22 and 12-36 to swap that 36 to a 42. I wonder what that will do?
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Old 11-05-12, 06:29 AM   #15
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This is a good read. As I had started on a 420 with a half step and rarely found use of the granny, too. I do not spin when riding and like a good gear transition. This has me rethinking my current 520 with its 48 36 22 and 12-36 to swap that 36 to a 42. I wonder what that will do?

22, 42, 48 wouldn’t be a good half step plus granny. That would be more of a “one step” meaning each time you dropped down one and one you would be in nearly the exact same gear you were in.
If you feel 42t would be a more correct center ring for you then the outer at 45t as I did would give you the half’s and not lower your top gear a great amount.

As a side note I was riding some over the weekend and a couple times I flipped the front up 42 to 45 and started to hit the brifter again as I didn’t hear it shift, only to look down and see it shifted fine. I never thought I would be saying a front shift was so smooth and quite that I would have to look. I don’t think that will be a problem that will be hard to get used to.
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Old 07-19-16, 10:11 AM   #16
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I took a few years off to build a house and haven’t been riding much. I got on the Windsor the other day and went for a spin and the smooth shifting half step still gave me a smile and reminded me of this thread.

I thought I would give it a bump after 4 years in the archives for any new guys that might be looking to go old school.

Well I will have to look around and see what is modern now after a few years of not reading.
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Old 07-19-16, 12:56 PM   #17
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I have worked on customer bikes with a less than 10 t difference between the 2 outer chainrings .

Once you set the triple FD high enough to clear the Middle One Its, by necessity,
WAY above the smaller outer chainring.

Just put a 44 in the middle and forget the outer chainring, cut teeth off a 54t.

//
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Old 07-19-16, 01:02 PM   #18
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I took a few years off to build a house and havenít been riding much. I got on the Windsor the other day and went for a spin and the smooth shifting half step still gave me a smile and reminded me of this thread.

I thought I would give it a bump after 4 years in the archives for any new guys that might be looking to go old school.

Well I will have to look around and see what is modern now after a few years of not reading.
Good to see you again, Bud!
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Old 07-19-16, 03:26 PM   #19
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I took a few years off to build a house and havenít been riding much. I got on the Windsor the other day and went for a spin and the smooth shifting half step still gave me a smile and reminded me of this thread.

I thought I would give it a bump after 4 years in the archives for any new guys that might be looking to go old school.

Well I will have to look around and see what is modern now after a few years of not reading.
Yeah, that is an awesome gear-range!!! Holy smokes - 12-36 on the cassette?!? - that is great.

If only something like that was for a 7-speed it could work with my current derailleur/shifters!
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Old 07-19-16, 04:26 PM   #20
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I took a few years off to build a house and havenít been riding much. I got on the Windsor the other day and went for a spin and the smooth shifting half step still gave me a smile and reminded me of this thread.

I thought I would give it a bump after 4 years in the archives for any new guys that might be looking to go old school.

Well I will have to look around and see what is modern now after a few years of not reading.
I mentioned above (in 2012) that I used a one and a half step system with a road triple and after market 24T granny. But when I did the Pacific Coast two years ago I swapped the 52 for a 46 to give me a 46/42/24 front with eight speed 11/12/14/16/18/21/16/32 for half step with granny. I was happy with the gearing but I did not find the half step with granny to be as big an advantage as I had hoped. The Pacific Coast route has too many ups and downs with changes of grade that are big enough that the change of slope requires shifting several gears at once. That said, I plan to use that gearing of future trips with my derailleur touring bike.

For around home use, I am using the one and a half step plus granny with a 52/42/24 road triple with an after market 24T granny. But touring, the 46T will go back on. The reason I prefer the 52 for around home use is that there are several long shallow downhills that I pedal down at high speed, I need the higher gearing for that.

The attached photo is the crankset with 46/42/24.
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Old 07-20-16, 04:41 AM   #21
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Good to see you again, Bud!
Great to see some familiar faces on the forum. Thanks
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Old 07-20-16, 04:47 AM   #22
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Yeah, that is an awesome gear-range!!! Holy smokes - 12-36 on the cassette?!? - that is great.

If only something like that was for a 7-speed it could work with my current derailleur/shifters!
Iím sure you could work out the numbers for a half step with 7 speed also. Actually as Tourist in MSN stated with my 9 speed the half steps become really small. 7 would be nice half steps and you would have a huskier rear gearing.
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Old 07-20-16, 05:48 AM   #23
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I mentioned above (in 2012) that I used a one and a half step system with a road triple and after market 24T granny. But when I did the Pacific Coast two years ago I swapped the 52 for a 46 to give me a 46/42/24 front with eight speed 11/12/14/16/18/21/16/32 for half step with granny. I was happy with the gearing but I did not find the half step with granny to be as big an advantage as I had hoped. The Pacific Coast route has too many ups and downs with changes of grade that are big enough that the change of slope requires shifting several gears at once. That said, I plan to use that gearing of future trips with my derailleur touring bike.

For around home use, I am using the one and a half step plus granny with a 52/42/24 road triple with an after market 24T granny. But touring, the 46T will go back on. The reason I prefer the 52 for around home use is that there are several long shallow downhills that I pedal down at high speed, I need the higher gearing for that.

The attached photo is the crankset with 46/42/24.
You were in on quite a bit of my investigation into how I wanted my gearing to work and very big influence on my final gearing.

So you ended pretty close to what I had, on the bike you did the half step on. I went 45/42 and you did 46/42 I almost did that as finding a 45 I could afford I went with the Chop Saw Ring. I had planned on if it worked cutting some fancy shapes into the big blank ring, but as time went on I grew to like the look of it. I still might do something one of these days to it.

You are right the half steps buys you nothing on changing grades where you need about 2 to 6 half steps for a shift. I have never used mine yet where I run thru all the gear combinations sequentially. Mainly I am on the 42 and skipping around on the back on rolling terrain.

I find the half steps really nice on flatter ground where I want to correct for slight changes and wind. Sometimes in those cases half of a shift is the ticket. The even nicer use for the 45t ring and one I didnít even consider until I was riding it a bit was in the tallest 3 gears the straighter chain line made a big difference for me.

101 GI was more than tall enough for me as Iím getting older if I spin out on a downhill Iím happy to coast. I can see if you have the use for taller gears leaving the 11t and the big ring for the 1 Ĺ step. When I had my 120 GI I seldom used it and mostly just to keep my legs warm on a long downhill at a slower cadence than normal.

It is all about compromising to suit the individualís strengths and desire. What I like best about is in normal riding around here the granny gear is just there for the occasional climb. Many rides it never gets used. All the rest of the shifts are effortless. If I see Iím going to be coming up to a point where I will be using the 3 small cogs I flip it to the 45t ring and then shift around on the 5 outside cogs and end up with the straighter chain line. When I do have to shift down to the granny it is nice to have a range of the inside 6 cogs that doesnít force me to have to shift up and down between the center ring and the granny I get up to 35 GI when on the granny without any problems and 18 GI when I really need it.

Getting it right for yourself and where you ride is the key.
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Old 07-20-16, 09:58 AM   #24
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Yeah, that is an awesome gear-range!!! Holy smokes - 12-36 on the cassette?!? - that is great.

If only something like that was for a 7-speed it could work with my current derailleur/shifters!
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I’m sure you could work out the numbers for a half step with 7 speed also. Actually as Tourist in MSN stated with my 9 speed the half steps become really small. 7 would be nice half steps and you would have a huskier rear gearing.
+1. Yeah, there are a lot of 7-speed cassettes that half-step well. The 12-28 "E" cassette is the same as Bud's without the two biggest cogs.

If you want to do half-step plus granny, the best bang for your buck is probably the 11-28 (HG41) or 12-32 (HG20 or SRAM). www.gear-calculator.com is great for mapping this stuff out visually. Good luck!
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Old 07-20-16, 09:58 AM   #25
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...
I find the half steps really nice on flatter ground where I want to correct for slight changes and wind. Sometimes in those cases half of a shift is the ticket. ...
Yup, that is exactly why I did it. With one and a half step, I often find myself shifting both front and rear derailleurs for a slight change of grade to accomplish a one half shift. Around home there are many places where I have very subtle changes in grade.

The other reason I made the change was that swapping the 46T for 52T gave me one more gear, I had a 55.2 and 64.4 gear inch gears, the swap gave me a 60.5 gear in between that at times I had wished I had on previous tours when I had the 52T setup. That cost me some high gears that I really have little desire to use when I have my bike loaded down with camping gear.

I bought several Campy square taper triples a decade ago when Campy was moving away from that system. I had two derailleur touring bikes with those Campy triples, but now down to one. And have one rando bike with one of them too. I still have two more sets of those crank arms, one with chainrings in storage waiting for my next project.

But my last tour, I used my Rohloff bike, a half step on that would be more complicated than I want to attempt.

I think I bought the 46 instead of 45 simply because I found a 46 for a good price whereas a 45T chainring that fits on a Campy 135mm BCD is very rare and might not even exist.
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