Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-18-12, 10:00 PM   #1
roadrecumbent
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
If you are going to ride 50+ miles, you need this bike

I showed this bike here 4 years ago, since then I've added folding handle bars. When I was 18 (1971) I was in top shape. I went on a lot of 20 and 30 mile rides. The day I went 50, my body started complaining, elbows, neck, ect. With this bike, I switch from front to back quite often, and I don't get stiff, plus, I'm using different muscles or just using them differently, and switching seats feels like switching from tired muscles to fresh ones. The bike is heavier and less efficient than my Cannondale, but anything over 20 miles, I'm taking the 2 seater. http://www.roadrecumbent.com/
roadrecumbent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 10:13 PM   #2
xyzzy834
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The only thing it's missing is a panhead.
xyzzy834 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 10:18 PM   #3
mdilthey
Senior Member
 
mdilthey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Bikes: Nature Boy 853 Disc, Pugsley SS
Posts: 1,919
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 244 Post(s)
This seems like a great way to pick up girls. I'm in.
mdilthey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 10:22 PM   #4
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,533
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 641 Post(s)
OTOH, if you're going to ride 250 miles in 15 hours you need this bike (or something like it):
No pain at all, just a little tired. It was great fun. I was over 60 when I did that.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg rando_trek_side.jpg (63.4 KB, 423 views)
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 10:29 PM   #5
Bacciagalupe
Professional Fuss-Budget
 
Bacciagalupe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,457
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Plenty of people can ride 50, 70, 100 or more miles perfectly fine on a standard diamond-frame bike. People who need cushier rides can go with an "endurance" road bike or wider tires, or even a hybrid with suspension without having to go to such... extremes.
Bacciagalupe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 10:34 PM   #6
nevermore1701
Senior Member
 
nevermore1701's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: honolulu,hawaii
Bikes: giant
Posts: 163
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
that is pretty cool
nevermore1701 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 11:11 PM   #7
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 15,884
Mentioned: 61 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 925 Post(s)
I have an eye for the off-beat, and this (plus the others on the page) fits the bill. I wouldn't have the two seats, but have the rear one more forward... but yeah, why not? I wonder now if that back seat could be a stoker seat a-la-tandem.

As an aside, when Machka and I were cycling along the trail from Bordeaux in France to connect up with the Velodyssey Trail up the east coast, I spotted way a head a sparkle from a chromed fork.

I thought that it might be a chopper bike (as in full-sized motorised version) on the path, but I couldn't hear a sound. I braced for a bit of trouble. And, as it came closer, it became evident there was a pack of others behind it.

Then past us went around 10 chopper bicycles of various sizes and configurations, ridden by teenage and older guys and girls, some with chopper-style helmets on, most with black T-shirts and blue jeans... and everyone was having a ball. The section of trail was around 20 miles long, so they probably had put in a fair old ride to be where they were.
Rowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 11:35 PM   #8
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 25,912
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2261 Post(s)
Quote:
The only thing it's missing is a panhead.
I thought "knucklehead".
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-12, 11:42 PM   #9
DropBarFan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Bikes: 2013 Surly Disc Trucker, 2004 Novara Randonee , old fixie , etc
Posts: 2,171
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrecumbent View Post
I showed this bike here 4 years ago, since then I've added folding handle bars. When I was 18 (1971) I was in top shape. I went on a lot of 20 and 30 mile rides. The day I went 50, my body started complaining, elbows, neck, ect. With this bike, I switch from front to back quite often, and I don't get stiff, plus, I'm using different muscles or just using them differently, and switching seats feels like switching from tired muscles to fresh ones. The bike is heavier and less efficient than my Cannondale, but anything over 20 miles, I'm taking the 2 seater. http://www.roadrecumbent.com/
Pretty wild & super low weight from carbon too. Wish the big companies would make a carbon tourer. In my area I see lots of recumbents, mostly older guys on shorter local rides but hey they look comfy & your bike is lighter than those bents so hill climbing seems no problem. I've seen pics of Danish upright commuters that have super-relaxed frame angles & also I remember (as a kid) a local guy who converted his StingRay-type bike into a chopper with a HUGE extended front fork...it rode a bit wobbly but only because the extended fork was crappy thin tubing. Also I've seen a couple of one-legged military vets zooming around on road bikes faster than I can go with two legs. One was on the DC interstate beltway which is a bit dangerous even for cars...he was the only guy I ever saw riding on the Beltway.

So props for breaking the envelope! Re switching seats: myself I note that sometimes I want to slide back on the saddle for more comfort or efficiency, your bike simply expands on that I guess.
DropBarFan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-12, 08:41 AM   #10
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 13,615
Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2955 Post(s)
Looks to be inspired by "Easy Rider."
indyfabz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-12, 09:12 AM   #11
Cyclebum 
Senior Member
 
Cyclebum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: NE Tx
Bikes: Tour Easy, Linear USS, Lightening Thunderbolt, custom DF, Raleigh hybrid, Felt time trial
Posts: 2,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cool indeed!
__________________
The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me
Cyclebum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-12, 11:47 AM   #12
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1,697
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrecumbent View Post
I showed this bike here 4 years ago, since then I've added folding handle bars. When I was 18 (1971) I was in top shape. I went on a lot of 20 and 30 mile rides. The day I went 50, my body started complaining, elbows, neck, ect. With this bike, I switch from front to back quite often, and I don't get stiff, plus, I'm using different muscles or just using them differently, and switching seats feels like switching from tired muscles to fresh ones. The bike is heavier and less efficient than my Cannondale, but anything over 20 miles, I'm taking the 2 seater. http://www.roadrecumbent.com/
An interesting build, but doubt it is what very many folks need or want...marketing pitch aside.
ksisler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-12, 11:51 AM   #13
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1,697
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
OTOH, if you're going to ride 250 miles in 15 hours you need this bike (or something like it): No pain at all, just a little tired. It was great fun. I was over 60 when I did that.
Looks like a nice bike. What model is it?

It could be improved by swapping in some touring wheels preferrably with a dynohub and by adding a rack and panniers on the front.
ksisler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-12, 12:05 PM   #14
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,533
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 641 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksisler View Post
Looks like a nice bike. What model is it?

It could be improved by swapping in some touring wheels preferrably with a dynohub and by adding a rack and panniers on the front.
It's a '99 Trek 5200. There are faster bikes now, but it's a very comfortable ride as configured. I've since almost worn out those rims. I will probably replace them with Soul wheels, since I can't replace the rims. I hope they'll be as comfy as the Rolfs. Sure don't need no Dynohub . . .
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-12, 06:06 PM   #15
zebede
Hello
 
zebede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Suncoast, Florida
Bikes: n+1
Posts: 696
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
The advantages of a recumbent is lowered wind resistance and greater comfort, The disadvantage of a traditional (?) recumbent is the inability to use your body weight during take off or climbing. This design seems to negate the disadvantage. Bravo. I believe the concept has a future.
zebede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-16, 11:54 PM   #16
roadrecumbent
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 51
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Been 4 years. Made some improvements. I think I'm done. (same page top link takes you to.) http://www.roadrecumbent.com/

Last edited by roadrecumbent; 12-08-16 at 12:11 AM.
roadrecumbent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 12:54 AM   #17
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes:
Posts: 5,389
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 553 Post(s)
Does it come with a removable beard for bent mode?

alan s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 07:57 AM   #18
mstateglfr
Senior Member
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Bikes: '87 Miyata 912, '80 Schwinn Voyageur 11.8, '90 Fuji Saratoga, '90 Diamondback Ascent EX, Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4
Posts: 4,565
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1064 Post(s)
Well its certainly creative.
mstateglfr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 08:42 AM   #19
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 13,615
Mentioned: 54 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2955 Post(s)
It would be faster if it were red. Just sayin'.
indyfabz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 09:30 AM   #20
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit
Bikes: 1978 Schwinn Le Tour III
Posts: 4,465
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1643 Post(s)
But how do I attach a rack?
jefnvk is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 09:41 AM   #21
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...
Posts: 17,042
Mentioned: 160 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 643 Post(s)
You definitely weren't born to follow!

The head angle creeps me out. Is it stable enough to take both hands off the handlebar? I used to ride a 'bent, and it was really unstable, I didn't like taking even one hand off the bar. It was fast, but stressful.
__________________
I put new leather on ruined saddles like Brooks, etc. You can reach me by private message.
rhm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 03:49 PM   #22
Doug5150
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: IL-USA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 63 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrecumbent View Post
I showed this bike here 4 years ago, since then I've added folding handle bars. ...
First off I would point out that this general idea isn't new; I've seen online where a number of people have basically built the same thing by converting a womens'/low-step-over tandem to a recumbent, where they add a recumbent seat in the rear step-through area of the frame. This way it was possible to sit in the rear recumbent seat or the front/upright seat, while still pedaling and steering.

I wish you luck but this is a type of bike that is a tough sell because it doesn't seem to have much of an interested audience. Upright riders can't understand why you'd want the recumbent part, and recumbent riders wouldn't want the upright part except maybe for climbing very steep hills. And nobody touring can clime steep hills all day, they end up walking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
OTOH, if you're going to ride 250 miles in 15 hours you need this bike (or something like it):
No pain at all, just a little tired. It was great fun. I was over 60 when I did that.
What brand of padded shorts were you wearing?

You can say that you like it--but a real recumbent would have been more comfortable, and (depending on what bike you chose) might have been faster as well, if that mattered.

Recumbents certainly have their disadvantages but their main consistent advantage is much greater riding comfort than any upright bike will get you. The butt pain, neck pain and hand numbness typical on upright bikes doesn't really happen at all with most recumbents, and recumbent shorts don't even have padding in them.
Doug5150 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 05:17 PM   #23
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 12,533
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 641 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doug5150 View Post
First off I would point out that this general idea isn't new; I've seen online where a number of people have basically built the same thing by converting a womens'/low-step-over tandem to a recumbent, where they add a recumbent seat in the rear step-through area of the frame. This way it was possible to sit in the rear recumbent seat or the front/upright seat, while still pedaling and steering.

I wish you luck but this is a type of bike that is a tough sell because it doesn't seem to have much of an interested audience. Upright riders can't understand why you'd want the recumbent part, and recumbent riders wouldn't want the upright part except maybe for climbing very steep hills. And nobody touring can clime steep hills all day, they end up walking.


What brand of padded shorts were you wearing?

You can say that you like it--but a real recumbent would have been more comfortable, and (depending on what bike you chose) might have been faster as well, if that mattered.

Recumbents certainly have their disadvantages but their main consistent advantage is much greater riding comfort than any upright bike will get you. The butt pain, neck pain and hand numbness typical on upright bikes doesn't really happen at all with most recumbents, and recumbent shorts don't even have padding in them.
Threads like this are sad to me. Way too many people think that there is a mechanical fix for fitness. If they just had the right bike or the right fit or the right components everything would be fine. The problem in cycling is that there is a little truth to this: you need the right saddle and the right gearing. But everything else is fitness. Yes, you can climb steep hills all day on your touring bike. Yes, you can ride 750 miles in under 90 hours. Yes you can ride a diamond frame bike long distances day after day without neck, hand, or arm pain. Leg pain if you ride hard enough and long enough, yes, but I would hope we expect that.

Recumbents are a good case in point. As some people age, they want things made easier for them and get a recumbent. I'm not talking about those who must ride a recumbent because of injury. I'm so happy they're still riding! I'm talking about all the recumbents I've passed, many of them going very slowly. I've never been passed on my diamond frame by a recumbent that wasn't a fully faired HPV. No, they are not faster. Look at the course records for the 508, for instance: Furnace Creek 508 Course Records or RAAM results. They're slower, usually much slower, which is the reason that most roadies ride right by them.

My wife and I tour on our tandem, team age now 138. During one of our fully loaded tours, we passed 2 young fit-looking men touring on recumbents on a long relatively shallow climb. They looked to be going as hard as they could, one of them gradually dropping the other. We never saw them again.

So don't give up and get a recumbent or an electric-assist bike. Instead, train and stay healthy and strong. Pedal on! My motto: you can keep doing it as long as you keep doing it. Never give up.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 06:22 PM   #24
superdex
staring at the mountains
 
superdex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Parker, CO
Bikes: 1x8 mtb kid-puller, Javelin Boca
Posts: 3,950
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 126 Post(s)
yay for self promotion!
superdex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-16, 06:34 PM   #25
edthesped
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: N@
Bikes: Huffy Thunder Road
Posts: 630
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 120 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
Threads like this are sad to me. Way too many people think that there is a mechanical fix for fitness. If they just had the right bike or the right fit or the right components everything would be fine. The problem in cycling is that there is a little truth to this: you need the right saddle and the right gearing. But everything else is fitness. Yes, you can climb steep hills all day on your touring bike. Yes, you can ride 750 miles in under 90 hours. Yes you can ride a diamond frame bike long distances day after day without neck, hand, or arm pain. Leg pain if you ride hard enough and long enough, yes, but I would hope we expect that.

Recumbents are a good case in point. As some people age, they want things made easier for them and get a recumbent. I'm not talking about those who must ride a recumbent because of injury. I'm so happy they're still riding! I'm talking about all the recumbents I've passed, many of them going very slowly. I've never been passed on my diamond frame by a recumbent that wasn't a fully faired HPV. No, they are not faster. Look at the course records for the 508, for instance: Furnace Creek 508 Course Records or RAAM results. They're slower, usually much slower, which is the reason that most roadies ride right by them.

My wife and I tour on our tandem, team age now 138. During one of our fully loaded tours, we passed 2 young fit-looking men touring on recumbents on a long relatively shallow climb. They looked to be going as hard as they could, one of them gradually dropping the other. We never saw them again.

So don't give up and get a recumbent or an electric-assist bike. Instead, train and stay healthy and strong. Pedal on! My motto: you can keep doing it as long as you keep doing it. Never give up.
I'm of the opinion that whatever bike it takes to motivate one to get out is the best bike. My other half is fused in several places and physically can't ride a non very upright bike. I've been trying to get her to test ride a recumbent for a couple of years now and she flat out refuses.

Quote:
Originally Posted by superdex View Post
yay for self promotion!
No different than anyone talking about how great their new short haul busser is... More power to the OP, I personally would never ride one but watched all of his videos and marveled at his creativity.
edthesped is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:39 PM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION