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  1. #1
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    possible touring bike?

    Ive been thinkin bout traveling for a while now and have recently been obsessing over going to seattle from Topeka, Ks (scince yesterday) anyways, my buddy hit me up today sayin he picked up a raleigh that was to tall for him (60cm raleigh gran sport) and that I could just have it. Ive been ridin single speed and fixed gear for the last 3 years and have done a good amount of 40-60 mile rides so Im confident Ill be able to knock that out and plenty more with gears. my question is will this be a good base for a touring bike. Ill be putting bar end shifters on it rather then the down tubes and 700c rather then 27''s
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Hey man, if the frame fits and it'll take rack(s), it can be made into a touring bike. Tweek 'til it's perfect for YOU. With your experience, you already know what that is.

    Remember: Put the gear in one pile, money in another. Halve the gear and double the money.
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  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Touring is an activity, bike is a tool.. can you ride it all day, go to sleep ,
    and get up and go further the next day?

    then you are on a Bike Tour.

  4. #4
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    Hopefully the pic doesn't show your seat position. If you go minimalist mini front rack , frame bag and rear rack with no panniers otherwise front lowriders and rear rack load.
    Last edited by LeeG; 01-14-13 at 08:00 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member fettsvenska's Avatar
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    It looks to be an OK frame for touring, as long as it fits you. If you are going to go with a different wheel size you might want to think about 650B.

  6. #6
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    Ive been thinkin bout traveling for a while now and have recently been obsessing over going to seattle from Topeka, Ks (scince yesterday) anyways, my buddy hit me up today sayin he picked up a raleigh that was to tall for him (60cm raleigh gran sport) and that I could just have it. Ive been ridin single speed and fixed gear for the last 3 years and have done a good amount of 40-60 mile rides so Im confident Ill be able to knock that out and plenty more with gears. my question is will this be a good base for a touring bike. Ill be putting bar end shifters on it rather then the down tubes and 700c rather then 27''s
    Those old Raliegh make excellent touring bikes. I'd check the clearance because you might want 35mm or larger tires, the 650B option is a good one to look at, especially sincy it looks like the old Weinman centerpulls which might have the reach you need. Anyway good luck, good choice.

    Marc
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    I found that old bikes with clearence for 27"x1 1/4 did fine with 700x35

  8. #8
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    Leo, thanks for that reply! I have some 700c's with 35s currently on em off my peugeot im going to see if I theyll fit in there tommorow. I work at a volunteer bikeshop down here so Im going down thursday to have a field day re-packing bearings and running new cables and seeing If we dont have some bar end shifters down there I can snag. also, thats def not the saddle or saddle position ill be going with in response to u as well lee g. Im going on a tight budget here though of however much cash I can come up with as I go along so im trying to use as many parts as I can scrounge up.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    ill also be adding rear paniers/rack trying to stay away from the front just cause I feel like that will allow me to over pack but if I need extra room for food/water then I may go with a handlebar bag atleast.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    ill also be adding rear paniers/rack trying to stay away from the front just cause I feel like that will allow me to over pack but if I need extra room for food/water then I may go with a handlebar bag atleast.
    The reason for front loading isn't to over pack but to balance. You could load the equivalent of a small rear pannier load from front to rear w/o panniers for better handling. Just because you can install a rear rack doesn't mean that's where you should put 90% of your gear. A small front rack is better than a big handlebar bag for front loads .

  11. #11
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    if you can get everything in the 4 panniers, and nothing on top of the rear rack then that is good..

    Small dense heavy stuff in the front, bulky stuff in the rear,
    Sleeping bag and tent In rather than on top.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 01-15-13 at 11:04 AM.

  12. #12
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    I hear ya on the weight distribution thing leeg hadnt really thought in depth about that though. I was really diggin on these paniers http://www.upgradecycle.com/inertia-...Q#.UPTM2B0W0zc and then I could throw a tent in the middle and have it secured from moving side to side then bungee tent on top and roll.

  13. #13
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    really* not leeeg. too much lysol fumes.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    I hear ya on the weight distribution thing leeg hadnt really thought in depth about that though. I was really diggin on these paniers http://www.upgradecycle.com/inertia-...Q#.UPTM2B0W0zc and then I could throw a tent in the middle and have it secured from moving side to side then bungee tent on top and roll.

    Yr "diggin" on 3316 cubic inches of panniers and you are worried that a front load will lead to overpacking?

    Twanker, you're already overpacking with those panniers. Jesus man you're piling 40lbs on the back and I'm talking about 5lbs on the front with 20lbs on the back.

  15. #15
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    is that alot? lol, I liked the option of being able to unbuckle the top so I could keep valuables in there and easily bring it along if I went into a store or had to leave it unattended.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    is that alot? lol, I liked the option of being able to unbuckle the top so I could keep valuables in there and easily bring it along if I went into a store or had to leave it unattended.
    Lol, see ya after you have figured out how much stuff yr carrying.

  17. #17
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    hmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    Lol, see ya after you have figured out how much stuff yr carrying.
    I guess I didnt understand that because I had space meant I had to completely pack it to the brim. perhaps you could suggest a better set of paniers?

  18. #18
    Senior Member BigBlueToe's Avatar
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    I toured on a Raleigh like that when I was first starting out. It was a 10-speed with steel rims. I could have used a granny gear for hills, but I was young and strong and could grunt my way up. I broke a few spokes and the rims dented a few times - had to "straighten" them out as best I could (with pliers?) and so braking was a bit jerky. But I was young and didn't know any better and couldn't afford much anyway....and I had a fantastic time on those early tours!

    I'd see if I could fit some strong wheels. If there isn't enough room between the rear dropouts, use Sheldon Brown's method for cold setting the frame. I did it on an old steel Schwinn frame I bought for my wife. It was relatively easy.

    I'd also make sure I had a triple crankset in front with a nice low granny - 24 or 22 teeth. Now that I'm a more serious tourer my routes often take me over mountain passes. I wouldn't want to grunt up those without a good low gear. With a really low setup mountain passes are slow but not painful.

    Have fun. It sounds like a great project!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    I guess I didnt understand that because I had space meant I had to completely pack it to the brim. perhaps you could suggest a better set of paniers?
    Not so much better as in smaller. A partially loaded bag will be loose and floppy unless you add more straps.

    Your average 10spd or sport tour bike isn't designed to carry a large weight on the rear wheel. It was designed to have a rider between two wheels. Many people have piled stuff on the rear rack and gone touring but at some point you're no longer riding a bike but handling a whippy wheelbarrow. The fun part about touring is riding the bike as opposed to hauling a whippy load that makes the bike wallow like a wet noodle.

    Front low riders are the best way to carry a pannier load on old road bikes because it puts a significant weight under the control of your arms instead of letting that weight lever oscillations from behind the rear wheel to the head tube. It may not feel right or normal at first because bike handling gets slowed down a LOT with front low riders. A heavy rear load makes the front end quick and light which might seem like a good idea for maneuvering but what's really happening is that the bike gets driven by that weight in ways you struggle to control.

    The front wheel is stronger than the rear wheel so moving some weight forward ensures the rear wheel lasts longer, which might be an issue if you're using used or light wheels.

    If want the potential to carry a kitchen sink I'd pick a mtn bike w 26" wheels instead of huge panniers.

    If you want to pull together a touring bike from old road bikes and have the potential to carry that sink don't put 90% of the weight on the rear wheel.

    If you start with small panniers you can always add more if the bike can take it and you need it. Listening to others stories you'll hear a lot more folks who mailed stuff home mid trip than increased their load.

  20. #20
    Junior Member Troywanker's Avatar
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    that makes sense, I may see what I can pick up from the shop in lines of cheap new wheel set. my 700c have alot of miles on them and the rear already has a couple blown spokes that need tending to. And ill start looking into front paniers. oh and im going to see what we have at the shop for different chain rings....I dont for-see a 52 being utilized all the much. anyone know a fairly average travel speed for touring? im guessing somewhere around 10mph? I can move but by no means am I a powerful beast either. I love sprinting up hills but Topekas also relatively flat/long gradual hills so they arent exactly the hardest things to conquer.
    Last edited by Troywanker; 01-15-13 at 11:17 AM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    I hear ya on the weight distribution thing leeg hadnt really thought in depth about that though. I was really diggin on these paniers http://www.upgradecycle.com/inertia-...Q#.UPTM2B0W0zc and then I could throw a tent in the middle and have it secured from moving side to side then bungee tent on top and roll.
    $.02 put these or similar on the front then load the rear rack. Don't bother getting mondo duty rear rack if money is tight since you won't be putting a mondo pannier load back there.

    http://www.upgradecycle.com/axiom-mo...l#.UPWNRmt5mSM

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troywanker View Post
    that makes sense, I may see what I can pick up from the shop in lines of cheap new wheel set. my 700c have alot of miles on them and the rear already has a couple blown spokes that need tending to. And ill start looking into front paniers. oh and im going to see what we have at the shop for different chain rings....I dont for-see a 52 being utilized all the much. anyone know a fairly average travel speed for touring? im guessing somewhere around 10mph? I can move but by no means am I a powerful beast either. I love sprinting up hills but Topekas also relatively flat/long gradual hills so they arent exactly the hardest things to conquer.
    If you haven't done the math comparing ratios of different gear combinations it's easy to obsess but it'll help to eliminate useless gears. Most cassettes have an 11 tooth small cog which gives as high a gear you will practically use with a 42t chainring, yea 52 tooth was common back when freewheels had a 14t small cog for the average "10 speed" but in your swapping wheels around you might find silly combos. If you have an old road crank like the bike in the picture you can get adequate low gears with a wide cassette in the rear while carrying a couple of useless high gears. You may find it difficult to find smaller big chainrings without spending as much money as a cheap mtn. crankset. If you can get a mtn crank on that bb. You'll have all the low gears you need even if it means taking off the inner ring to fit the bb.

    10mph is an easy average over time while your riding speed might be closer to 12-14.

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/

  23. #23
    Senior Member clasher's Avatar
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    If you've got a co-op nearby or an active craigslist/kijiji look out for an older hybrid... I've seen more than a few at my co-op that are basically flat-bar touring bikes... some even have low-rider eyelets on the front forks. It wouldn't be hard to put the drop bars and use bar-end shifters. I built my first touring bike around a modern specialized sirrus hybrid and it worked fine but the wheels were only 32 spokes so I bought a new one for the rear before my trip. Honestly if I were starting over I would just buy an older ATB style bike from the late 80s or early 90s and put drop bars on that. The 26" wheels are stronger and tires are available pretty much everywhere in that size. A lot of those older ATBs have really long chainstays and relaxed geometries that make for comfortable riding.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by clasher View Post
    If you've got a co-op nearby or an active craigslist/kijiji look out for an older hybrid... I've seen more than a few at my co-op that are basically flat-bar touring bikes... some even have low-rider eyelets on the front forks. It wouldn't be hard to put the drop bars and use bar-end shifters. I built my first touring bike around a modern specialized sirrus hybrid and it worked fine but the wheels were only 32 spokes so I bought a new one for the rear before my trip. Honestly if I were starting over I would just buy an older ATB style bike from the late 80s or early 90s and put drop bars on that. The 26" wheels are stronger and tires are available pretty much everywhere in that size. A lot of those older ATBs have really long chainstays and relaxed geometries that make for comfortable riding.
    Yep, a 90's Specialized CrossRoads would work fine.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Gravity Aided's Avatar
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    I find the old MTBs work great as 26" tourers. Last one I fixed up had flat bars with front and rear racks . I preferred most weight on the front rack . I think it was a really old Specialized Hardrock . I'm currently building a drop bar tourer from a Fuji Thrill . But back to the Raleigh , do you like the ride ? I think that is a really nice looking bike and if the clearance is okay for your heels with panniers on a rear rack, that may be a faster bike for you . Sometimes, front racks can be hard to find outside of mail order. LeeG has a good idea with low rider mounts in front . My reasoning is that the rear wheel bears more weight, usually has tighter spokes due to the cogset , and can break spokes easier on the cog side due to the tension being different due to the offset from having the cog there. It is also an easier handling bike with the load in the front. Your results may vary. I wish you the very best of luck and skill in your travels

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